Bookmark: B.Majchrzak.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Activating the Tools of Social Media for Innovative Collaboration in the Enterprise
Series Title: SpringerBriefs in Digital Spaces
Author: Majchrzak, Ann
Author: Fife, Elizabeth
Author: Min, Qingfei
Author: Pereira, Francis
Date: 2014
Pages: 26
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 978-3-319-03229-0 (print), 978-3-319-03230-6 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction: Background Literature Review (1-7)
Field Research Methods (9-15)
Findings (17-22)
Tools for Use of Social Media for Collaborative Innovation (23-24)
Contributions (25-26)

Bookmark: B.Wechsung.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Evaluation Framework for Multimodal Interaction: Determining Quality Aspects and Modality Choice
Series Title: T-Labs Series in Telecommunication Services
Author: Wechsung, Ina
Date: 2014
Pages: 191
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Weblink: ISBN: 978-3-319-03809-4 (print), 978-3-319-03810-0 (online)
Contents:
Introduction (1-6)
What Are Multimodal Systems? Why Do They Need Evaluation? -- Theoretical Background (7-22)
What to Evaluate? A Taxonomy of Quality Aspects of Multimodal Interfaces (23-46)
How to Evaluate? Development of the MMQQ (MultiModal Quality Questionnaire) (47-84)
Is the Whole the Sum of its Parts? -- Predicting the Quality of Multimodal Systems Based on Judgments of Single Modalities (85-98)
What Determines Modality Selection Strategies? -- Identifying Factors Influencing Modality Selection and Perceived Quality (99-133)
Is Modality Selection Predictable? -- Using Quality Ratings to Predict Modality Selection in Multimodal Systems (134-146)
Summary and Outlook (147-153)

Bookmark: B.Bratteteig.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Disentangling Participation: Power and Decision-making in Participatory Design
Series Title: Computer Supported Cooperative Work
Author: Bratteteig, Tone
Author: Wagner, Ina
Date: 2014
Pages: 118
Publisher: Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Standard number: ISBN: 978-3-319-06162-7 (Print) 978-3-319-06163-4 (Online)
Weblink: Online Access
Contents:
Introduction (1-12)
Decision-Making in Design (13-22)
The Cases (23-38)
Kinds of Decisions (39-55)
Streams of Decisions (57-65)
Power, Influence, Trust and Loyalty (67-89)
Participation (91-109)
Conclusions (111-118)

Bookmark: B.Ritter.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Foundations for Designing User-Centered Systems: What System Designers Need to Know about People
Author: Ritter, Frank E.
Author: Baxter, Gordon D.
Author: Churchill, Elizabeth F.
Date: 2014
Pages: 442
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-5133-3 (print), 978-1-4471-5134-0 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
== INTRODUCTION: AIMS, MOTIVATIONS, AND INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN ==
Introducing User-Centered Systems Design (3-31)
User-Centered Systems Design: A Brief History (33-54)
== DESIGN RELEVANT USER CHARACTERISTICS: THE ABCS ==
Anthropometrics: Important Aspects of Users' Bodies (57-80)
Behavior: Basic Psychology of the User (81-121)
Cognition: Memory, Attention, and Learning (123-164)
Cognition: Mental Representations, Problem Solving, and Decision Making (165-200)
Cognition: Human--Computer Communication (201-223)
Social: Social Cognition and Teamwork (225-252)
Social: Theories and Models (253-280)
Errors: An Inherent Part of Human-System Performance (281-305)
== METHODS ==
Methodology I: Task Analysis (309-333)
Methodology II: Cognitive Dimensions and the Gulfs (335-352)
Methodology III: Empirical Evaluation (353-380)
== SUMMARY ==
Summary: Putting It All Together (383-410)

Bookmark: B.Hausser.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Foundations of Computational Linguistics: Human-Computer Communication in Natural Language
Author: Hausser, Roland
Date: 2014
Pages: 518
Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Standard number: ISBN: 978-3-642-41430-5 (print), 978-3-642-41431-2 (online)
Note: 3rd Edition
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
== THEORY OF LANGUAGE ==
Computational Analysis of Natural Language (3-23)
Smart vs. Solid Solutions (25-43)
Cognitive Foundations of Semantics (45-63)
Language Communication (65-85)
Using Language Signs on Suitable Contexts (87-101)
Structure and Functioning of Signs (103-123)
== THEORY OF GRAMMAR ==
Formal Grammar (127-142)
Language Hierarchies and Complexity (143-165)
Basic Notions of Parsing (167-187)
Left-Associative Grammar (LAG) (189-208)
Hierarchy of LA Grammar (209-229)
LA and PS Hierarchies in Comparison (231-246)
== MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX ==
Words and Morphemes (249-267)
Word Form Recognition in LA Morph (269-290)
Corpus Analysis (291-309)
Basic Concepts of Syntax (311-327)
LA Syntax for English (329-349)
LA Syntax for German (351-375)
== SEMANTICS AND PRAGMATICS ==
Three Kinds of Semantics (379-396)
Truth, Meaning, and Ontology (397-416)

Bookmark: B.Premaratne.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Computer Interaction Using Hand Gestures
Series Title: Cognitive Science and Technology
Author: Premaratne, Prashan
Date: 2014
Pages: 174
Publisher: Springer Singapore
Standard number: ISBN: 978-981-4585-68-2 (print), 978-981-4585-69-9 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction %P 1-4)
Historical Development of Hand Gesture Recognition %P 5-29)
Pre-processing %P 31-73)
Feature Extraction %P 75-103)
Effective Hand Gesture Classification Approaches %P 105-143)
Sign Languages of the World %P 145-169)
Future Trends in Hand Gesture Recognition %P 171-174)

Bookmark: B.Osherenko.14
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Social Interaction, Globalization and Computer-Aided Analysis: A Practical Guide to Developing Social Simulation
Series Title: Human--Computer Interaction Series
Author: Osherenko, Alexander
Date: 2014
Pages: 245
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-6259-9 (print), 978-1-4471-6260-5 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
== MULTIDISCIPLINARY PART ==
Introduction (3-12)
Related Work on Social Interaction and Social Simulation (13-56)
Scenarios of Social Interaction (57-93)
== DEVELOPMENTAL PART ==
Acquisition of Intercultural Data (97-119)
Framework for Data Processing (121-152)
Prototypes of Social Simulation (153-218)
Evaluation of the Prototyping Approach (219-234)
Conclusion (235-237)

Bookmark: B.Norman.13
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Design of Everyday Things
Author: Norman, Don
Date: 2013-11-05
Pages: 368
Publisher: Basic Books; MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-52567-4; 978-0-262-52567-1 (ebook); ISBN 978-0-465-07299-6 (print)
Keywords: Industrial design, Psychological aspects; Human engineering
Note: Revised and Expanded Edition
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/design-of-everyday-things-revised.html
Contents:
1. The Psychopathology of Everyday Things
2. The Psychology of Everyday Actions
3. Knowledge in the Head and in the World
4. Knowing What to Do: Constraints Discoverability, and Feedback
5. Human Error? No, Bad Design
6. Design Thinking
7. Design in the World of Business

Bookmark: B.Salgado.2013
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Journey Through Cultures: Metaphors for Guiding the Design of Cross-Cultural Interactive Systems
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Salgado, Luciana Cardoso de Castro
Author: Leitão, Carla Faria
Author: de Souza, Clarisse Sieckenius
Date: 2013
Number of Chapters: 5
Pages: 125
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-4114-3
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-4113-6 (print), 978-1-4471-4114-3 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-18)
Semiotic Engineering and Culture (19-42)
Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors (43-67)
A Case Study: Re-designing the AVIS Website (69-114)
Final Discussion (115-125)

Bookmark: B.Boy.2013
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Orchestrating Human-Centered Design
Author: Boy, Guy André
Date: 2013
Number of Chapters: 9
Pages: 205
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-4339-0
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-4338-3 (print), 978-1-4471-4339-0 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-7)
The Orchestra Model (9-34)
Cognitive Engineering (35-57)
Life-Critical Systems (59-87)
The Making of Complex Systems (89-115)
Organization Design and Management (117-138)
Modeling and Simulation (139-172)
Advanced Interaction Media (173-196)
Conclusion (197-205)

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.2013
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Personas -- User Focused Design
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series 15
Author: Nielsen, Lene
Date: 2013
Number of Chapters: 12
Pages: 154
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-4084-9
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-4083-2 (print), 978-1-4471-4084-9 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction: Stories About Users (1-24)
1: A Slice of the World (25-35)
2: The First Connections (37-44)
3: Food for Thought (45-48)
4: The Final Number (49-57)
5: Do You Know Karina? (59-79)
6: Exposition to Action (81-86)
7: The Reality of Everyone? (87-89)
8: Get the Message Across! (91-98)
9: Stories About the Future (99-125)
10: It Does Not End Here (127-128)
Personas in a More User-Focused World (129-154)

Bookmark: B.Crabtree.2012
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Doing Design Ethnography
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Crabtree, Andrew
Author: Rouncefield, Mark
Author: Tolmie, Peter
Date: 2012
Number of Chapters: 10
Pages: 205
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-2726-0
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4471-2725-3 (print), 978-1-4471-2726-0 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Précis (1-5)
Ethnography and Systems Design (7-19)
Our Kind of Sociology (21-41)
Finding the Animal in the Foliage (43-66)
Dispensing with Method (67-87)
Doing Fieldwork (89-109)
Analysing the Ethnographic Record (111-133)
Informing Design (135-158)
Some Common Misunderstandings, Objections and Complaints (159-181)
Design Ethnography in a Nutshell (183-205)

Bookmark: B.Kuniavsky.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Observing the User Experience: A Practitioner's Guide to User Research
Author: Goodman, Elizabeth
Author: Kuniavsky, Mike
Author: Moed, Andrea
Date: 2012
Pages: 608
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-384869-5, 978-0-12-384869-7
Note: Second Edition
Contents:
Part I: Why Research is Good and How It Fits Into Product Development
1. Typhoon: A Fable
2. Do a Usability Test Now!
3. Balancing Needs Through Iterative Development
4. The User Experience
Part II: User Experience Research Techniques
5. The Research Plan
6. Universal tools: Recruiting and Interviewing
7. User Profiles
8. Contextual Inquiry, Task Analysis, Card Sorting
9. Focus Groups
10. Usability Tests
11. Surveys
12. Ongoing Relationship
13. Log Files and Customer Support
14. Competitive Research
15. Others' Hard Work: Published Information and Consultants
16. Emerging Techniques
Part III: Communicating Results
17. Reports and Presentations
18. Creating a User-Centered Corporate Culture
Appendix A: The Budget Research Lab
Appendix B: Common Survey Questions
Appendix C: Observer Instructions

Bookmark: B.Steimle.2012
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Pen-and-Paper User Interfaces: Integrating Printed and Digital Documents
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Steimle, Jürgen
Date: 2012
Number of Chapters: 8
Pages: 176
Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-20276-6
Standard number: ISBN: 978-3-642-20275-9 (print), 978-3-642-20276-6 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-18)
Survey of Pen-and-Paper Computing (19-65)
Interaction Model of Pen-and-Paper User Interfaces (67-89)
CoScribe: A Platform for Paper-based Knowledge Work (91-102)
Collaborative Cross-media Annotation of Documents (103-126)
Hyperlinking between Printed and Digital Documents (127-147)
Paper-based Tagging of Documents (149-165)
Conclusions (167-176)

Bookmark: B.Connor.12
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Pro HTML5 Accessibility
Author: Connor, Joshue O
Date: 2012
Pages: 386
Publisher: Apress
Standard number: ISBN: 1-430-24194-2, 978-1-430-24194-2
Contents:
Introduction to HTML5 Accessibility
Understanding Disability and Assistive Technology
JavaScript Isn't a Dirty Word, and ARIA Isn't Just Beautiful Music
API and DOM
HTML5: The New Semantics and New Approaches to Document Markup
Images, Rich Media, Audio, and Video in HTML5
HTML5 and Accessible Data Tables
HTML5 and Accessible Forms
HTML5, Usability, and User-Centered Design
Tools, Tips, and Tricks: Assessing Your Accessible HTML5 Project

Bookmark: B.Sauro.12
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Quantifying the User Experience: Practical Statistics for User Research
Author: Sauro, Jeff
Author: Lewis, James R.
Date: 2012
Pages: 312
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-384968-3
Keywords: User interfaces (Computer systems) -- Testing -- Statistical methods; COMPUTERS -- Interactive & Multimedia; COMPUTERS -- Social Aspects -- Human-Computer Interaction
Contents:
1. Introduction and how to use this book
2. Quantifying user research
3. How precise are our estimates? confidence intervals
4. Did we meet or exceed our goal?
5. Is there a statistical difference between designs?
6. What sample sizes do we need? part 1: summative studies
7. What sample sizes do we need? part 2: formative studies
8. Standardized usability questionnaires
9. Six enduring controversies in measurement and statistics
10. Wrapping up
Appendix: a crash course in fundamental statistical concepts.

Bookmark: B.Cunningham.12
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Accessibility Handbook
Author: Cunningham, Katie
Date: 2012
Pages: 100
Publisher: O'Reilly Media
Standard number: ISBN: 1-449-32285-9, 978-1-449-32285-4
Contents:
Complete blindness
Visual accessibility: other types
Audio accessibility
Physical accessibility
Cognitive disabilities
Selling accessibility
Additional resources

Bookmark: B.Kraft.2012
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Experience Innovation: User Centered Design That Works
Author: Kraft, Christian
Date: 2012
Number of Chapters: 20
Pages: 196
Publisher: Apress
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4302-4150-8
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4302-4149-2 (print), 978-1-4302-4150-8 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
User Experience and Why It Matters (1-10)
Innovating in User Experience (11-20)
Identifying Target Users (21-26)
Identifying User Needs (27-42)
Identifying Core Tasks (43-56)
Innovating Around Core Tasks (57-64)
Innovating for New Technologies (65-74)
Innovating for Applications (75-79)
Relieving the Pain (81-100)
Innovating Around First Impressions (101-108)
Creating Positive Surprises: The Wow Factor (109-121)
Innovating Around an Ecosystem (123-130)
Innovating with Lead Users (131-135)
Copying with Pride (137-148)
Innovating Around Paradoxes (149-156)
Innovating Around Context Awareness (157-164)
Innovating Around New Products and Users (165-177)
Prototyping and Verifying Solutions (179-184)
Meeting Organizational Challenges (185-194)
Conclusion (195-196)

Bookmark: B.Weinschenk.11
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People
Author: Weinschenk, Susan
Date: 2011
Pages: 256
Publisher: New Riders
Standard number: ISBN: 0-321-76753-5, 978-0-321-76753-0
Contents:
How people see
How people read
How people remember
How people think
How people focus their attention
What motivates people
People are social animals
How people feel
People make mistakes
How people decide

Bookmark: B.Reeves.2011
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Interfaces in Public Settings: Understanding the Role of the Spectator in Human-Computer Interaction
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Reeves, Stuart
Date: 2011
Number of Chapters: 9
Pages: 190
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-0-85729-265-0
Standard number: ISBN: 978-0-85729-264-3 (print), 978-0-85729-265-0 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-8)
From Individuals to Third Parties, from Private to Public (9-27)
Studying Technology in Public Settings (29-41)
Audience and Participants: One Rock (43-66)
Professionals and Non-professionals: The Journey into Space (67-92)
Orchestration and Staging: Fairground: Thrill Laboratory (93-122)
Frames and Bystanders: Uncle Roy All Around You (123-139)
A Framework for Designing Interfaces in Public Settings (141-175)
Conclusion (177-190)

Bookmark: B.Rogers.11
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interaction Design: Beyond Human - Computer Interaction
Author: Rogers, Yvonne
Author: Sharp, Helen
Author: Preece, Jenny
Date: 2011
Pages: 592
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-66576-9, 978-0470665763
Note: 3rd Edition
Weblink: www.id-book.com/
Contents:
1. What is interaction design?
	1.1 Introduction
	1.2 Good and poor design
	1.3 What is interaction design?
	1.4 The user experience
	1.5 The process of interaction design
	1.6 Interaction design and the user experience
2. Understanding and conceptualizing interaction
	2.1 Introduction
	2.2 Understanding the problem space and conceptualizing design
	2.3 Conceptual models
	2.4 Interface metaphors
	2.5 Interaction types
	2.6 Paradigms, theories, models, and frameworks
3. Cognitive aspects
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 What is cognition?
	3.3 Cognitive frameworks
4. Social interaction
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 Being social
	4.3 Face-to-face conversations
	4.4 Remote conversations
	4.5 Telepresence
	4.6 Co-presence
	4.7 Emergent social phenomena
5. Emotional interaction
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 Emotions and the user experience
	5.3 Expressive interfaces
	5.4 Frustrating interfaces
	5.5 Persuasive technologies and behavioural change
	5.6 Anthropomorphism and zoomorphism
	5.7 Models of emotion
6. Interfaces
	6.1 Introduction
	6.2 Interface types
	6.3 Natural user interfaces
	6.4 Which interface?
7. Data gathering
	7.1 Introduction
	7.2 Five key issues
	7.3 Data recording
	7.4 Interviews
	7.5 Questionnaires
	7.6 Observation
	7.7 Choosing and combining techniques
8. Data analysis, interpretation, and presentation
	8.1 Introduction
	8.2 Qualitative and quantitative
	8.3 Simple quantitative analysis
	8.4 Simple qualitative analysis
	8.5 Tools to support data analysis
	8.6 Using theoretical frameworks
	8.7 Presenting the findings
9. The process of interaction design
	9.1 Introduction
	9.2 What is involved in interaction design?
	9.3 Some practical issues
10. Establishing requirements
	10.1 Introduction
	10.2 What, How, and Why?
	10.3 What are requirements?
	10.4 Data gathering for requirements
	10.5 Data analysis, interpretation, and presentation
	10.6 Task description
	10.7 Task analysis
11. Design, prototyping, and construction
	11.1 Introduction
	11.2 Prototyping and construction
	11.3 Conceptual design: moving from requirements to first design
	11.4 Physical design: getting concrete
	11.5 Using scenarios in design
	11.6 Using prototypes in design
	11.7 Support for design
12. Introducing evaluation
	12.1 Introduction
	12.2 The why, what, where, and when of evaluation
	12.3 Types of evaluation
	12.4 Evaluation case studies
	12.5 What did we learn from the case studies?
13. An evaluation framework
	13.1 Introduction
	13.2 DECIDE: A framework to guide evaluation
14. Evaluation Studies: From Controlled to Natural Settings
	14.1 Introduction
	14.2 Usability testing
	14.3 Experiments
	14.4 Field studies
15. Evaluation: Inspections, Analytics and Models
	15.1 Introduction
	15.2 Inspections: heuristic evaluation and walkthroughs
	15.3 Analytics
	15.4 Predictive models

Bookmark: B.Champion.2011
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Playing with the Past
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Champion, Erik
Date: 2011
Number of Chapters: 9
Pages: 210
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-84996-501-9
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-84996-500-2 (print), 978-1-84996-501-9 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introducing Virtual Travel (1-16)
Virtual Environments (17-26)
Virtual Places (27-62)
Cultural and Social Presence (63-82)
Game-Style Interaction (83-128)
Playing with the Past (129-155)
Augmenting the Present With the Past (157-176)
Evaluating Virtual Heritage (177-199)
Conclusion (201-210)

Bookmark: B.Aigner.2011
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visualization of Time-Oriented Data
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Aigner, Wolfgang
Author: Miksch, Silvia
Author: Schumann, Heidrun
Author: Tominski, Christian
Date: 2011
Number of Chapters: 8
Pages: 267
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-0-85729-079-3
Standard number: ISBN: 978-0-85729-078-6 (print), 978-0-85729-079-3 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-13)
Historical Background (15-44)
Time & Time-Oriented Data (45-68)
Visualization Aspects (69-103)
Interaction Support (105-126)
Analytical Support (127-145)
Survey of Visualization Techniques (147-254)
Conclusion (255-267)

Bookmark: B.Yunker.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Art of the Global Gateway: Strategies for Successful Multilingual Navigation
Author: Yunker, John
Date: 2010-10
Pages: 194
Publisher: Byte Level Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-9796475-3-3, 978-0-9796475-3-6
Keywords: global gateway, global usability
Note: 2nd Edition
Note: You don't get a second chance to make a first impression
Language: English
Weblink: bytelevel.com/books/gateway/
E-mail: jyunker@bytelevel.com
Contents:
Welcome, Benvenuti, Bienvenidos...
First Things First
	One Internet; many languages
Elements of Global Navigation
	Country codes: Local "front doors"
	The global gateway: What users see
		The splash global gateway
		The permanent global gateway
		Global gateway icons
		The language/country menu
		Mapping the global gateway
	Language Negotiation
		Web Browsers and Language Settings
	Geolocation: We know where you live
Global Gateway Best Practices
	Translate the gateway, but don't overtranslate
	Wave flags with caution
	Be careful what you call "country"
	Pull-down menus don't scale
	Don't play favorites (or favourites)
	Icons speak louder than words
	Use as little text as necessary
	Use the "sweet spot"
	Use Unicode
	Place usability ahead of creativity
	Don't pretend you speak languages that you don't
	Global gateways shouldn't make you think
	Keep legalese to a minimum
	Embedded text is untranslated text
	Don't put age before language
Global Gateways Profiles
	IKEA
	GE
	Google
	Xbox
Spanish-Language Gateways for the US
	What's the URL?
	Spanish-language gateways
Trending Now: Mobile Devices and Social Media
	The global gateway and mobile devices
	The global gateway and social media
Developing a Global Gateway Strategy
	Of big steps and baby steps
	Case Study: The growth of a global gateway
	Global gateway FAQ
	Global gateway checklist
	Terminology
	Selected country codes
Absract: Web globalization opens your web site to the world; it also opens you up to new challenges, like directing users to their localized content. The Art of the Global Gateway is your guide to the best practices in multilingual navigation. A global gateway is the initial point of contact between your web site and the world -- it is, in effect, a web user's first impression. To truly welcome visitors to your web site, you'll need a welcoming global gateway.

Bookmark: B.Albert.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Beyond the Usability Lab: Conducting Large-scale Online User Experience Studies
Author: Albert, William
Author: Tullis, Thomas
Author: Tedesco, Donna
Date: 2010
Pages: 328
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-374892-5, 978-0-12-374892-8
Contents:
1. Introduction to online usability methods
2. Planning your study
3. Designing your study
4. Launching your study
5. Data preparation
6. Data analysis and presentation
7. Building your own online study
8. Online solutions

Bookmark: B.Howard.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design to Thrive: Creating Social Networks and Online Communities that Last
Author: Howard, Tharon
Date: 2010
Pages: 248
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-374921-2, 978-0-12-374921-5
Contents:
Chapter 1: Introduction
2: What are the factors needed for sustainable online communities?
3: Remuneration
4: Influence
5: Belonging
6: Significance
7: Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Johnson.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing with the Mind in Mind: A Simple Guide to Understanding User Interface Design Rules
Author: Johnson, Jeff
Date: 2010
Pages: 256
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-375030-X, 978-0-12-375030-3
Weblink: Companion Site
Contents:
We perceive what we expect
Our vision is optimized to see structure
We seek and use visual structure
Reading is unnatural
Our color vision is limited
Our peripheral vision is poor
Our attention is limited; our memory is imperfect
Limits on attention, shape, thought and action
Recognition is easy; recall is hard
Learning from experience and performing learned actions are easy; problem solving and calculation are hard
Many factors affect learning
We have time requirements

Bookmark: B.Kizza.2010
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Ethical and Social Issues in the Information Age
Series Title: Texts in Computer Science
Author: Kizza, Joseph Migga
Date: 2010
Number of Chapters: 14
Pages: 289
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-84996-038-0
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-84996-037-3 (print), 978-1-84996-038-0 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
History of Computing (1-13)
Morality and the Law (15-30)
Ethics and Ethical Analysis (31-54)
Ethics and the Professions (55-77)
Anonymity, Security, Privacy, and Civil Liberties (79-101)
Intellectual Property Rights and Computer Technology (103-128)
Social Context of Computing (129-158)
Software Issues: Risks and Liabilities (159-186)
Computer Crimes (187-206)
New Frontiers for Computer Ethics (207-220)
Cyberspace, Cyberethics, and Social Networking (221-246)
Computer Networks and Online Crimes (247-261)
Computer Crime Investigations -- Computer Forensics (263-276)
Biometrics (277-289)

Bookmark: B.Norman.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Living with Complexity
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 2010
Pages: 312
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-01486-6; 978-0-262-01486-1
Keywords: Technology, Social aspects
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/living-with-complexity.html
Contents:
1. Living with complexity: why complexity is necessary
2. Simplicity is in the mind
3. How simple things can complicate our lives
4. Social signifiers
5. Design in support of people
6. Systems and services
7. The design of waits
8. Managing complexity: a partnership
9. The challenge

Bookmark: B.Bernsen.2010
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Multimodal Usability
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Bernsen, Niels Ole
Author: Dybkjær, Laila
Date: 2010
Number of Chapters: 18
Pages: 419
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-84882-553-6
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-84882-552-9 (print), 978-1-84882-553-6 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Structure, Usability, Readership (1-19)
Intermezzo 1: Three Multimodal Cases (21-23)
Creating a Model of Use (25-65)
Modalities and Devices (67-111)
Intermezzo 2: Status on Cases and Next Steps (113-119)
Common Approaches, Methods, Planning (121-147)
Intermezzo 3: Case Usability Workplan, Design (149-159)
Question-Answering (161-195)
Meetings with Discussion (197-208)
Observation of Users (209-231)
Imagination (233-262)
Interaction with the System (263-286)
Lab Sessions with Subjects (287-308)
Intermezzo 4: Case Usability Method Plan (309-314)
Data Handling (315-349)
Usability Data Analysis and Evaluation (351-385)
Intermezzo 5: Sudoku Usability Evaluation (387-412)
Multimodal Usability: Conclusions and Future Work (413-419)

Bookmark: B.Adlin.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Essential Persona Lifecycle: Your Guide to Building and Using Personas
Author: Adlin, Tamara
Author: Pruitt, John
Date: 2010
Pages: 240
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-381418-9, 978-0-12-381418-0
Contents:
Introduction: The Persona Lifecycle
Phase 1: Planning a Persona Effort
Phase 2: Creating Personas
Phase 3: Launching and Communicating Personas
Phase 4: Using Personas
Phase 5: ROI and Reuse of Personas
Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Schumacher.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Handbook of Global User Research
Author: Schumacher, Robert
Date: 2010
Pages: 336
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-374852-6, 978-0-12-374852-2
Contents:
1. Foundations and definition of user research
	1.1 Globalization, localization, and user research
	1.2 Origins of user research
	1.3 What is user research
	1.4 Getting the terms right
	1.5 Dynamic nature of user research
	1.6 User researc and other disciplines
	1.7 Models of global user research
	1.8 What is this book about
2. Project management for global research
	2.1 Introduction
	2.2 Engaging stakeholders in research activities
	2.3 Planning international studies
	2.4 Finding quality in-country resources
	2.5 Managing an international project team
	2.6 Key takeaways
3. Preparation
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 Understanding research objectives and target user groups
	3.3 Reviewing the stimuli
	3.4 Creating the test plan
	3.5 Recruiting
	3.6 Developing the moderator's guide
	3.7 Localizing the moderator's guide
	3.8 Sharing materials with local teams
	3.9 Briefing with local teams
	3.10 Local pilot testing
	3.11 Key takeaways
4. Fieldwork For Global User Research Projects
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 Planning logistics for a global study
	4.3 Preparing test materials for a global study
	4.4 Assembling and training the team
	4.5 Conducting the fieldworl
	4.6 Analyzing data and reporting results
	4.7 Key takeaways
5. Analysis and Reporting
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 Planning analyses for global projects
	5.3 Collaborating and sharing analyses from each locale
	5.4 Reporting and presenting results
	5.5 Key takeaways
6. Global user research methods
	6.1 Introduction
	6.2 Ethnographic studies
	6.3 Focus groups
	6.4 Eye tracking
	6.5 Unmoderated remote usability testing
	6.6 Web analytics
	6.7 Online surveys
	6.8 Personas
7. User research throughout the world
	7.1 Introduction
	7.2 Australia
	7.3 Brazil
	7.4 China
	7.5 Denmark
	7.6 Finland
	7.7 France
	7.8 Germany
	7.9 India
	7.10 Italy
	7.11 Japan
	7.12 Korea
	7.13 Malaysia
	7.14 The Netherlands
	7.15 New Zealand
	7.16 Russia
	7.17 Spain
	7.18 Switzerland
	7.19 Turkey
	7.20 United Arab Emirates
	7.21 United Kingdom
	7.22 United States
8. The role of professional organizations in user research
	8.1 Introduction
	8.2 Making the most out of a professional network
	8.3 The local chapters of professional organizations
	8.4 Professional organizations in a global market
	8.5 Organizations and research
	8.6 World Usability Day as an example
	8.7 Directory of organizations
	8.8 Key takeaways
9. The impact of culture on user research
	9.1 Introduction: How culture impacts user research
	9.2 The implications of context to user research
	9.3 The impact of the development process on cross-cultural user research
	9.4 A model for understanding the impact of culture on user research
	9.5 The impact on user research of the cultural differences between moderators
	9.6 The culture of nations and organizations and its implications on user research
	9.7 Cognitive differences between East and West and their relationship to user research
	9.8 Key takeaways
10. Closing Thoughts

Bookmark: B.Kolko.2010
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Thoughts on Interaction Design
Author: Kolko, Jon
Date: 2010
Pages: 168
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-378624-X, 978-0-12-378624-1
Contents:
Introduction
Section One / Understanding Interaction Design
Chapter One: Multiple Roots, and an Uncertain Future
Chapter Two: Computing and Human Computer Interaction
Interaction Design in an Engineering Centric World
Section Two / Connecting People, Emotions and Technology
Chapter Three: A process for Thinking about People
Chapter Four: Managing Complexity
Chapter Five: Shaping Aesthetics to Inform Experience
Interaction Design as Business Lubricant
Section Three / The Rhetorical Nature of Interaction Design
Chapter Six: Interaction Design and Communication
On the Nature of Interaction as Language
Section Four / Challenges Facing Interaction Design in Industry
Chapter Seven: The Political Dynamics of Product Development
Getting Design Done
In Summary

Bookmark: B.Beyer.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Agile Methods
Author: Beyer, Hugh
Date: 2010
Pages: 71
Publisher: Morgan & Claypool
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-60845372-6 DOI: 10.2200/S00286ED1V01Y201002HCI010
Contents:
Introduction
Common Agile Methods
Agile Culture
Best Practices for Integrating UX with Agile
Structure of a User-Centered Agile Process
Structuring Projects
Conclusion
Absract: With the introduction and popularization of Agile methods of software development, existing relationships and working agreements between user experience groups and developers are being disrupted. Agile methods introduce new concepts: the Product Owner, the Customer (but not the user), short iterations, User Stories. Where do UX professionals fit in this new world? Agile methods also bring a new mindset -- no big design, no specifications, minimal planning -- which conflict with the needs of UX design. This lecture discusses the key elements of Agile for the UX community and describes strategies UX people can use to contribute effectively in an Agile team, overcome key weaknesses in Agile methods as typically implemented, and produce a more robust process and more successful designs. We present a process combining the best practices of Contextual Design, a leading approach to user-centered design, with those of Agile development.

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.09
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Author: Plaisant, Catherine
Date: 2009
Pages: 672
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-321-53735-1
Note: 5th edition
Weblink: www.pearsonhighered.com/dtui5einfo/
Contents:
PART I: INTRODUCTION
	Chapter 1 Usability of Interactive Systems
		1.1 Introduction
		1.2 Usability Measures
		1.3 Usability Motivations
		1.4 Universal Usability
		1.5 Goals for Our Profession
	Chapter 2 Guidelines, Principles, and Theories
		2.1 Introduction
		2.2 Guidelines
		2.3 Principles
		2.4 Theories
PART II: DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES
	Chapter 3 Managing Design Processes
		3.1 Introduction
		3.2 Organizational Design to Support Usability
		3.3 The Four Pillars of Design
		3.4 Development Methodologies
		3.5 Ethnographic Observation
		3.6 Participatory Design
		3.7 Scenario Development
		3.8 Social Impact Statement for Early Design Review
		3.9 Legal Issues
	Chapter 4 Evaluating Interface Designs
		4.1 Introduction
		4.2 Expert Reviews
		4.3 Usability Testing and Laboratories
		4.4 Survey Instruments
		4.5 Acceptance Tests
		4.6 Evaluation During Active Use
		4.7 Controlled Psychologically Oriented Experiments
PART III: INTERACTION STYLES
	Chapter 5 Direct Manipulation and Virtual Environments
		5.1 Introduction
		5.2 Examples of Direct Manipulation
		5.3 Discussion of Direct Manipulation
		5.4 3D Interfaces
		5.5 Teleoperation
		5.6 Virtual and Augmented Reality
	Chapter 6 Menu Selection, Form Fill-in, and Dialog Boxes
		6.1 Introduction
		6.2 Task-Related Menu Organization
		6.3 Single Menus
		6.4 Combinations of Multiple Menus
		6.5 Content Organization
		6.6 Fast Movement through Menus
		6.7 Data Entry with Menus: Form Fill-in, Dialog Boxes and Alternatives
		6.8 Audio Menus and Menus for Small Displays
	Chapter 7 Command and Natural Languages
		7.1 Introduction
		7.2 Command-Organization Functionality, Strategies, and Structure
		7.3 Naming and Abbreviations
		7.4 Natural Language in Computing
	Chapter 8 Interaction Devices
		8.1 Introduction
		8.2 Keyboards and Keypads
		8.3 Pointing Devices
		8.4 Speech and Auditory Interfaces
		8.5 Displays -- Small and Large
	Chapter 9 Collaboration and Social Media Participation
		9.1 Introduction
		9.2 Goals of Collaboration and Participation
		9.3 Asynchronous Distributed Interfaces: Different Place, Different Time
		9.4 Synchronous Distributed Interfaces: Different Place, Same Time
		9.5 Face-to-Face Interfaces: Same Place, Same Time
PART IV: DESIGN ISSUES
	Chapter 10 Quality of Service
		10.1 Introduction
		10.2 Models of Response Time Impacts
		10.3 Expectations and Attitudes
		10.4 User Productivity
		10.5 Variability in Response Time
		10.6 Frustrating Experiences
	Chapter 11 Balancing Function and Fashion
		11.1 Introduction
		11.2 Error Messages
		11.3 Nonanthropomorphic Design
		11.4 Display Design
		11.5 Web Page Design
		11.6 Window Design
		11.7 Color
	Chapter 12 User Documentation and Online Help
		12.1 Introduction
		12.2 Online versus Paper Documentation
		12.3 Reading from Paper versus from Displays
		12.4 Shaping the Content of the Documentation
		12.5 Accessing the Documentation
		12.6 Online Tutorials and Animated Demonstrations
		12.7 Online Communities for User Assistance
		12.8 The Development Process
	Chapter 13 Information Search
		13.1 Introduction
		13.2 Searching in Textual Documents and Database Querying
		13.3 Multimedia Document Searches
		13.4 Advanced Filtering and Search Interface
	Chapter 14 Information Visualization
		14.1 Introduction
		14.2 Data Type by Task Taxonomy
		14.3 Challenges for Information Visualization
	Afterword: Societal and Individual Impact of User Interfaces
		A.1 Future Interfaces
		A.2 Ten Plagues of the Information Age
		A.3 Continuing Controversies

Bookmark: B.Obendorf.2009
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Minimalism: Designing Simplicity
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Obendorf, Hartmut
Date: 2009
Number of Chapters: 11
Pages: 334
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-84882-371-6
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-84882-370-9 (print), 978-1-84882-371-6 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
== DESIGNING FOR AN AGE OF COMPLEXITY ==
Minimalism: Introduction and Synopsis (3-18)
== DEFINING MINIMALISM ==
In Search of "Minimalism" -- Roving in Art, Music and Elsewhere (21-64)
Minimalism for Interaction Design: a Proposal (65-78)
== RETHINKING MINIMALISM ==
Minimalism, Industrial Design and HCI (81-95)
Minimalism, Simplicity and Rules of Design (97-121)
== APPLYING MINIMALISM ==
Detecting the Minimal (125-237)
Designing the Minimal (239-295)
== REFLECTIONS ON MINIMALISM ==
Minimalism Revisited (299-319)
Minimal Aesthetics (321-328)
Unconnected Ends (329-331)
Conclusion (333-334)

Bookmark: B.Weinschenk.09
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Neuro Web Design: What Makes Them Click?
Author: Weinschenk, Susan
Date: 2009
Publisher: New Riders
Standard number: ISBN: 0-321-60360-5, 978-0-321-60360-9
Contents:
1: Designing Web Sites for Persuasion and the Unconscious Mind
2: Wanting to Belong: The Power of Social Validation
3: Feeling Indebted: How to Build in Reciprocity and Concession
4: Invoking Scarcity-If Something Seems Unavailable, We Seem to Want It Even More
5: Choosing Carefully-Given Too Many Choices, We Freeze (and Then We Don't Choose at All)
6: It's All About You: Speaking to the Self-Centered, Unconscious Mind
7: Building Commitment-We Want to Think We're Consistent
8: Using Similarity, Attractiveness, and Association: Are We the Same?
9: Afraid to Lose-How Fear of Loss Trumps Our Anticipation of Victory
10: Using Pictures and Stories-the Best Way to Talk to Our Unconscious Minds
11: We're Social Animals-Finding the Next Big Thing by Making It Social

Bookmark: B.Lazar.10
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Research Methods in Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Lazar, Jonathan
Author: Feng, Jinjuan Heidi
Author: Hochheiser, Harry
Date: 2009
Pages: 446
Publisher: Wiley
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-72337-8, 978-0-470-72337-1
Contents:
Preface
1 Introduction
2 Experimental Research
3 Experimental Design Methods
4 Statistical Analysis
5 Surveys
6 Time Diaries
7 Case Studies
8 Interviews and focus groups
9 Ethnography
10 Usability Testing
11 Analyzing qualitative data
12 Automated computer data collection methods
13 Measuring the human
14 Working with human subjects
15 Working with users with disabilities in research
Index

Bookmark: B.Kunert.2009
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Interaction Design Patterns for Interactive Digital Television Applications
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series
Author: Kunert, Tibor
Date: 2009
Number of Chapters: 7
Pages: 255
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-84882-275-7
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-84882-274-0 (print), 978-1-84882-275-7 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-17)
Interactive TV Applications and Their Context of Use (19-46)
Types of Design Guidance for iTV Applications (47-84)
User Tasks and Requirements for iTV Applications (85-98)
Design Pattern Collection for iTV (99-175)
Method of Pattern Development (177-245)
Conclusion (247-255)

Bookmark: B.Markopoulos.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Evaluating Children's Interactive Products: Principles and Practices for Interaction Designers
Author: Markopoulos, Panos
Author: Read, Janet C
Author: MacFarlane, Stuart
Author: Hoysniemi, Johanna
Date: 2008
Pages: 400
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-374111-4, 978-0-12-374111-0
Contents:
PART 1 CHILDREN AND TECHNOLOGY
1 What is a Child
2 Children and Interactive Technology
3 The Interactive Product Lifecycle
PART 2 EVALUATING WITH AND FOR CHILDREN
4 Ethical Practice in Evaluations
5 Planning the Evaluation Study
6 Before the Evaluation
7 During the Evaluation
8 After the Evaluation
PART 3 METHODS OF EVALUATION
9 Recording and Logging
10 Observation Methods
11 Verbalization Methods
12 The Wizard of Oz Method
13 Survey Methods
14 Diaries
15 Inspection Methods
PART 4 CASE STUDIES
16 Case Study 1: Game-controlling Gestures in Interactive Games
17 Case Study 2: Embedding Evaluation in the Design of a Pervasive Game Concept
18 Case Study 3: Using Survey Methods and Efficiency Metrics

Bookmark: B.Rubin.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Handbook of Usability Testing: How to Plan, Design, and Conduct Effective Tests
Author: Rubin, Jeffrey
Author: Chisnell, Dana
Date: 2008
Pages: 384
City: New York
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-18548-1, 978-0-470-18548-3
Note: 2nd Edition
Weblink: Related Website
Contents:
PART ONE. USABILITY TESTING -- AN OVERVIEW
1. What Makes Something Usable?
2. What Is Usability Testing?
3. When Should You Test?
4. Skills For Moderators
PART TWO. PROCESS FOR CONDUCTING A TEST
5. Develop The Test Plan
6. Set Up A Testing Environment
7. Find And Select Participants
8. Prepare Test Materials
9. Conduct The Test Sessions
10. Debrief With Observers
11. Analyze Data And Observations
12. Create Findings And Recommendations
PART THREE. ADVANCED STEPS
13. Variations On The Basic Method
14. Expanding Usability To User Experience
Afterword

Bookmark: B.Jones.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Keeping found things found: the study and practice of personal information management
Author: Jones, William P.
Date: 2008
Pages: 430
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 978-0-12370866-3 0-12-370866-4
Contents:
I. Foundations
1. A study and a practice
2. A personal space of information
3. A framework for personal information management
II: Activities
4. Finding and re-finding: From need to information
5. Keeping and organizing: From information to need
6. Maintaining information for now and for later
7. Managing privacy and the flow of information
8. Measuring and evaluating
9. Making sense of things
III: Solutions
10. Email disappears?
11. Search gets personal
12. PIM on the go;
13. PIM on the Web;
IV: Conclusions
14. Bringing the pieces together
15. Finding our way in/to the future

Bookmark: B.Tullis.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Measuring the User Experience: Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics
Author: Tullis, Tom
Author: Albert, Bill
Date: 2008
Pages: 317
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-373558-0 978-0-12-373558-4
Weblink: Companion Website
Weblink: Detailed Table of Contents
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Background
3. Planning a Usability Study
4. Performance Metrics
5. Issues-Based Metrics
6. Self-Reported Metrics
7. Behavioral and Physiological Metrics
8. Combined and Comparative Metrics
9. Special Topics
10. Case Studies
	10.1 Redesigning a Website Cheaply and Quickly
		+ Loranger, Hoa
	10.2 Usability Evaluation of a Speech Recognition IVR
		+ Lewis, James R.
	10.3 Redesign of the CDC.gov Website
		+ Bailey, Robert
		+ Wolfson, Cari
		+ Nall, Janice
	10.4 Usability Benchmarking Case Study: Mobile Music and Video
		+ Weiss, Scott
		+ Whitby, Chris
	10.5 Measuring the Effects of Drug Label Design and Similarity on Pharmacists' Performance
		+ Bojko, Agnieszka (Aga)
	10.6 Making Metrics Matter
		+ Zazelenchuk, Todd
11. Moving Forward

Bookmark: B.Dumas.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Moderating usability tests: principles and practice for interacting
Author: Dumas, Joseph S.
Author: Loring, Beth A.
Date: 2008
Pages: 185
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 978-0-12373933-9 0-12-373933-0
Contents:
1: Introduction 1
2: Getting Started as a Test Moderator  6
3: Golden Rules 1 to 5  20
3.1 Rule 1: Decide how to interact based on the purpose of the test 21
3.2 Rule 2: Respect participants' rights    24
3.3 Rule 3: You have a responsibility to future users   28
3.4 Rule 4: You are in charge but the participants are the experts  29
3.5 Rule 5: Being professional means being genuine  35
4: Golden Rules 6 to 10 42
4.1 Rule 6: Let the participants speak! 42
4.2 Rule 7: Your intuition can hurt and help you    45
4.3 Rule 8: Be unbiased 46
4.4 Rule 9: Don't give away information inadvertently   50
4.5 Rule 10: Watch yourself and keep sharp  51
5: First Contact: Setting the Tone   53
6: Interacting During the Session   75
7: Interacting During Post-Test Activities  99
8: Interacting in a Remote Test Session 114
9: Moderator-Participant Arrangements   134
10: Interacting with Diverse Populations    144
11: Integrating the Videos  168

Bookmark: B.Levenson.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability engineering: process, products, and examples
Author: Leventhal, Laura M.
Author: Barnes, Julie A.
Date: 2008
Pages: 314
Publisher: Pearson/Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-157008-0, 9780131570085
Keywords: User interfaces (Computer systems); Computer software -- Development; System design
Weblink: Table of Contents
Contents:
SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION TO USABILITY
	Chapter 1 - What is a user interface?
	Chapter 2 - What do we mean by HCI, usability and user interfaces?
	Chapter 3 - Defining usability and models of usability
SECTION 2 - THE PROCESS OF USABILITY ENGINEERING
	Chapter 4 - The process of usability engineering
SECTION 3 - DEFINING AND DOCUMENTING THE USER'S NEEDS
	Chapter 5 - Understanding and documenting the UI that the user has in mind
	Chapter 6 - Large-scale example of analysis and specification of user context, tasks and characteristics
SECTION 4 - DESIGNING A USER INTERFACE TO MATCH THE USER NEEDS
	Chapter 7 - Designing the interaction and designing a solution
	Chapter 8 - Interaction styles and how they relate to project situations
	Chapter 9 - More guidelines, some standards and generally some more ideas to improve your design of interaction
SECTION 5 - REVISITING THE PROCESS
	Chapter 10 - Revisiting the process: Prototyping your interaction
	Chapter 11 - Usability assessment
SECTION 6 - A LITTLE MORE ABOUT DESIGN
	Chapter 12 - Interaction design and evaluation example
	Chapter 13 - Specifying and analyzing your (quality) software design
SECTION 7 - CONTEXT, CONSTRAINTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR USER INTERFACE DESIGN
	Chapter 14 - The "H" in HCI
	Chapter 15 - Usability for everyone

Bookmark: B.King.08
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Website Optimization: Speed, Search Engine & Conversion Rate Secrets
Author: King, Andrew B.
Date: 2008
Pages: 394
Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Inc
Standard number: ISBN: 0-59-651508-1
Contents:
Part I - Search Engine Marketing Optimization
SEM Introduction
1 - Natural Search Engine Optimization
2 - SEO Case Study: PhillyDentistry.com
3 - Pay Per Click Optimization
4 - PPC Case Study: BodyGlove.com
5 - Conversion Rate Optimization summary
Part II - Web Performance Optimization
Web Performance Introduction
6 - Web Page Optimization
7 - CSS Optimization
8 - Ajax Optimization
9 - Advanced Web Performance Optimization
10 - Website Optimization Metrics

Bookmark: B.Cooper.07
Type: AUTHORED Book
Title: About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design
Author: Cooper, Alan
Author: Reimann, Robert
Author: Cronin, David
Date: 2007
Pages: 648
Publisher: WIley
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-08411-1, 978-0-470-08411-3
Contents:
Goal-directed design
Implementation models and mental models
Beginners, experts, and intermediates
Understanding users: Qualitative research
Modeling users: personas and goals
The foundations of design: scenarios and requirements
From requirements to design: the framework and refinement
Synthesizing good design: principles and patterns
Platform and posture
Orchestration and flow
Eliminating excise
Designing good behavior
Metaphors, idioms, and affordances
Visual interface design
Searching and finding: improving data retrieval
Understanding Undo
Rethinking files and save
Improving data entry
Pointing, selecting, and direct manipulation
Window behaviors
Controls
Menus
Toolbars
Dialogs
Errors, alerts, and confirmation
Designing for different needs
Afterword: On collaboration
Appendix A: Design principles

Bookmark: B.Cook.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Cook and Hussey's Assistive Technologies: Principles and Practice
Author: Cook, Albert M.
Author: Polgar, Jan Miller
Author: Hussey, Susan M.
Date: 2007
Pages: 592
Publisher: Mosby Elsevier
Standard number: ISBN: 0-323-03907-3, 978-0-323-03907-9
Note: 3rd Edition
Contents:
Introduction and overview
Framework for assistive technologies
Disabled human user of assistive technologies
Delivering assistive technology services to the consumer
Funding assistive technology services and systems
Seating systems as extrinsic enablers for assistive technologies
Human/assistive technology interface
Sensory aids for person with visual impairments
Sensory aids for person with auditory impairments
Assistive technologies for cognitive augmentation
Augmentative and alternative communication systems
Technologies that enable mobility
Technologies that aid transportation
Technologies that aid manipulation and control of the environment
Assistive technologies in the context of the classroom
Assistive technologies in the context of work

Bookmark: B.Moggridge.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Interactions
Author: Moggridge, Bill
Date: 2007
Pages: 766
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-13474-8 978-0-262-13474-3
Contents:
Foreword: What is interaction design?
	+ Smith, Gillian Crampton
Preface
Introduction
The mouse and the desktop
My PC
From the desk to the palm
Adopting technology
Play
Services
The Internet
Multisensory and multimedia
Futures and alternative nows
People and prototypes

Bookmark: B.Teeni.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Computer Interaction: developing effective organizational information systems
Author: Te'eni, Dov
Author: Carey, Jane M.
Author: Zhang, Ping
Date: 2007
Pages: 436
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-67765-5
Contents:
Foreword
	+ Benbasat, Izak
Preface
CONTEXT
1 Introduction
	1 Human-Computer Interaction: Definition, Importance and Scope
	2 Themes in HCI Underlying This Book
	3 Application-A Methodology for HCI Development
	4 The Structure of the Book
	5 Summary
	6 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	7 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	8 Case Study
	9 Exercises
2 Organizational and Business Context
	1 Introduction
	2 Individual Level
	3 Work Group Level
	4 Organizational Level Systems
	5 Interorganizational Systems
	6 Summary
	7 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	8 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	9 Case Study
	10 Exercises
FOUNDATIONS
3 Interactive Technologies
	1 Introduction
	2 Sensory Perception and Interactive Input Devices
	3 Output Devices
	4 Wearable Devices
	5 Wireless Devices
	6 Virtual Devices
	7 Summary
	8 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	9 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	10 Case Study
	11 Exercises
4 Physical Engineering
	1 Introduction
	2 Human Performance and Limitations
	3 Sensory Perceptions and Implications for Design
	4 Health Problems Associated with HCI
	5 Technical Support for the Disabled
	6 Summary
	7 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	8 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	9 Case Study
	10 Exercises
5 Congnitive Engineering
	1 A Simplified View of Human Information Processing
	2 The Complexity of HCI
	3 User Activity with Multiple Intentions
	4 Using GOMS to Describe User Activity
	5 Errors
	6 Fit and Complexity Extended
	7 Summary
	8 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	9 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	10 Case Study
	11 Exercises
6 Affective Engineering
	1 Introduction: Feeling and Attitude
	2 A Simplified View of Affect in HCI
	3 Attitudes
	4 Expanded View of Affect in HCI
	5 Flow and Playfulness
	6 Summary
	7 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	8 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	9 Exercises
APPLICATIONS
7 Evaluation
	1 Introduction
	2 Usability and Usability Engineering
	3 Evaluation Methods
	4 Standards
	5 Summary
	6 Appendix A: The Detailed CIF Template
	7 Appendix B: Research Tools
	8 Appendix C: Sample Laboratories for HCI Studies
	9 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	10 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	11 Case Study
	12 Exercises
8 Design Principles and Guidelines
	1 Introduction
	2 Design Principles
	3 Design Guidelines
	4 Summary
	5 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	6 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	7 Case Study
	8 Exercises
9 Tasks in the Organizational Context
	1 Introduction
	2 Characteristics of Organizational Tasks
	3 Work at the Office as Context-Tasks and Their Interrelations
	4 Decision Making as Organizational Task
	5 A Method for Task Analysis and Decision Support
	6 A Demonstration of the Method for Task Analysis
	7 Summary
	8 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	9 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	10 Exercises
	11 Appendix: Decision Decomposition Protocol
10 Componential Design
	1 Introduction
	2 Color
	3 Data Input
	4 Navigation and Flow Control
	5 Quantitative Graphics
	6 Form Design
	7 Summary
	8 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	9 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	10 Exercises
11 HCI Development Methodology
	1 Introduction
	2 The Role of HCI Development in SDLC
	3 The HCI Development Methodology
	4 Applying the HCI Development Methodology
	5 Summary
	6 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	7 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	8 Case Study
	9 Exercises
ADDITIONAL CONTEXT
12 Interpersonal Relationships, Collaboration, and Organization
	1 Introduction
	2 Collaboration
	3 The Issue of Trust
	4 Communication and Technology
	5 Work Group Level
	6 Enterprise-Level Systems
	7 Enterprise-Level Implementation Issues
	8 E-Commerce: Linking the Customer to the Enterprise
	9 Summary
	10 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	11 Bibliography
	12 Exercises
13 Social and Global Issues
	1 Introduction
	2 Social Context
	3 Ethical Considerations
	4 Global Context
	5 The Social and Global Aspects of the Internet
	6 Summary
	7 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	8 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	9 Case Study
	10 Exercises
14 Meeting the Changing Needs of IT Development and Use
	1 Introduction
	2 Emerging IT Use Changes and the Impacts
	3 Emerging IT Development Changes
	4 Summary
	5 Summary of Concepts and Terms
	6 Bibliography and Additional Readings
	7 Case Study
	8 Exercises
Glossary
Bibliography
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Pirolli.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Foraging Theory: Adaptive Interaction with Information
Series Title: Oxford Series in Human-Technology Interaction
Author: Pirolli, Peter
Date: 2007
Pages: 226
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 978-0-19-517332-1
Contents:
1: Information Foraging Theory: Framework and Method
2: Elementary Foraging Models
3: The Ecology of Information Foraging on the World Wide Web
4: Rational Analyses of Information Scent and Web Foraging
5: A Cognitive Model of Information Foraging on the Web
6: A Rational Analysis and Computational Cognitive Model of the Scatter/Gather Document Cluster Browser
7: Stochastic Models of Information Foraging by Information Scent
8: Social Information Foraging
9: Design Heuristics, Engineering Models, and Applications
10: Future Directions: Upward, Downward, Inward, and Outward

Bookmark: B.Sharp.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Sharp, Helen
Author: Rogers, Yvonne
Author: Preece, Jenny
Date: 2007
Pages: 800
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-01866-6; 978-0470018668
Note: 2nd Edition
Weblink: www.id-book.com/
Contents:
1	What is Interaction Design?
2	Understanding and Conceptualizing Interaction
3	Understanding Users
4	Designing for Collaboration and Communication
5	Affective Aspects
6	Interfaces and Interactions
7	Data Gathering
8	Data Analysis, Interpretation and Presentation
9	The Process of Interaction Design
10	Identifying Needs and Establishing Requirements
11	Design, Prototyping and Construction
12	Introducing Evaluation
13	An Evaluation Framework
14	Usability Testing and Field Studies
15	Analytical Evaluation

Bookmark: B.Lehto.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Introduction to Human Factors and Ergonomics for Engineers
Author: Lehto, Mark R.
Author: Buck, James R.
Date: 2007
Pages: 1000
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-5308-1; 9780805853087
Contents:
A GUIDED TOUR OF ERGONOMIC DESIGN
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	What Is Ergonomic Design?
	Human-Centered Design
	Military Equipment Design
	Ergonomic Criteria
	Models of Human Performance
	Macroergonomics
	Carrots and Sticks
	Trends in Industry That Impact Ergonomic Design
	Organizations and Additional Information on Ergonomic Design
	Ergonomic Methods
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
THE HUMAN SYSTEM
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	The Skeletal Subsystem
	The Muscles
	Body Movement
	The Sensory Subsystems
	Support Subsystems
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
DESIGN TO FIT TASKS, PROCESSES, AND PEOPLE
	About The Chapter
	Introduction
	Ergonomic Design Principles
	Visual Graphics of Operations
	Analysis of Tasks and Jobs
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
ASSESSMENT AND DESIGN OF THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Cleanliness, Clutter, and Disorder
	Temperature and Humidity
	Lightening and Illumination
	Noise
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
DESIGN OF WORK AREAS, TOOLS, AND EQUIPMENT
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Applied Anthropometry
	Design of Work Areas and Stations
	Office Design
	Design of Tools and Equipment
	Protective Equipment for the Operator
	Accommodating Handicapped People
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
METHODS IMPROVEMENT & MOTION ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL TASKS
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Methods Improvement
	Motion and Micromotion Study
	Manual Materials Handling
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
MEASUREMENT OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Some Probabilistic Assumptions
	Time Study
	Performance Leveling
	Determining Allowances
	Maintaining Standards
	Indirect Performance Measurement
	Criteria Other Than Time
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
PREDICTING HUMAN PERFORMANCE
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Synthetic Data Systems
	Standard Data Systems
	Cognitive Modeling
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
MEASUREMENT OF LEARNING AND FORGETTING
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	Performance Criteria and Experience Units
	Some Learning Curve Models
	Comparing Alternatives for Learnability
	The Correct Learning Curve Model
	Forgetting Curves
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
SAMPLING METHODS IN INDUSTRIAL ERGONOMICS
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	Activity Sampling
	Sampling Strategies
	Sequential Bayesian Work Sampling
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
QUESTIONNAIRES AND INTERVIEW
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Questionnaire Design
	Interviews
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
SIMULATION IN ERGONOMIC DESIGN
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Essential Elements of Computer Simulation
	Cognitive Simulation
	Operator-in-the-Loop Simulation
	A Simulation Strategy
	Design of Simulation Experiments
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
DESIGN FOR CREW-TEAM OPERATIONS
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Industrial Work Teams
	Simulating Industrial Crews
	Research, Development, and Design Teams
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
ERGONOMICS IN MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	System Reliability and Availability
	Maintenance Programs
	Reducing Maintenance Effort
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
ERGONOMICS OF PRODUCT QUALITY AND USABILITY
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Quality Management & Customer Driven Design
	Usability Analysis & Testing
	Designed Experiments
	Final Remarks
	References
	Exercises and Discussion Questions
INSPECTION & QUALITY CONTROL
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Some Common Types of Inspection
	Human Inspection
	Signal Detection Theory (SDT)
	Inspection Economics
	Improvement & Correction Strategies
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
MACROERGONOMICS OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	Some Historical Background
	Fundamental Concepts of Industrial Safety and Health
	Contemporary Occupational Health and Safety Management
	Hazards and Control Measures
	Warnings and Safety Programs
	Final Remarks
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
COMMUNICATION AND DISPLAY DESIGN
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Communication Theory
	Human Information Processing
	Display Design
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion Questions and Exercises
ERGONOMICS OF CONTROL
	About this Chapter
	Introduction
	Control Systems
	Manual Control
	Design of Controls
	Fuzzy Control
	Supervisory Control
	Final Comments
	References
	Some Discussion Questions
DECISION MAKING & DECISION SUPPORT
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	Classical or Normative Decision Theory
	Behavioral Decision Theory
	Naturalistic Decision Theory
	Group Decision Making
	Decision Support
	Final Remarks
	References
PERSONNEL SELECTION, PLACEMENT, AND TRAINING
	About the Chapter
	Introduction
	Personnel Selection and Placement
	Training
	Job Aids
	Economic Considerations in Training
	Final Comments
	References
	Discussion and Exercise Questions
	Suggested Solutions
DESIGN FOR COMPENSATION AND ACCOMMODATION
	About This Chapter
	Introduction
	Job Evaluation
	Measuring Productivity
	Wage Administration
	Job Design for Sub-Populations
	Final Remarks
	References
	Some Discussion Questions
	Some Exercises
	Solutions to Exercises
Appendix A: Selling Ergonomics to Management
Appendix B: Economic Analysis of Projects in Ergonomic Design and Management
Appendix C: Some Probability Distributions
Appendix D: Tables of Statistical Distributions
Appendix E: Some Fundamentals of Statistical Regression and Correlation
Appendix F: Fundamentals of Analysis of Variance

Bookmark: B.Redish.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works
Author: Redish, Janice (Ginny)
Date: 2007
Pages: 384
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-369486-8, 978-0-12-369486-7
Contents:
1 Content! Content! Content!
2 People! People! People!
3 Starting Well: Home Pages
4 Getting There: Pathway Pages
5 Writing Information, Not Documents
6 Giving Just the Essential Messages
7 Designing Web Pages for Ease of Use
Interlude: The New Life of Press Releases
8 Tuning Up Your Sentences
9 Using Lists and Tables
10 Breaking Up Your Text with Headings
Interlude: Legal Information Can Be Understandable, Too
11 Using Illustrations Effectively
12 Writing Meaningful Links
13 Getting From First Draft to Final Web Page
Interlude: Creating An Organic Style Guide
For More Information -- The Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Buston.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design
Author: Buxton, Bill
Date: 2007
Pages: 448
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-374037-1, 978-0-12-374037-3
Weblink: Companion Web Site
Contents:
PART I: DESIGN AS DREAMCATCHER
	Introduction
	Case Study: Apple, Design and Business
	The Bossy Rule
	A Snapshot of Today
	The Role of Design
	A Sketch of the Process
	The Cycle of Innovation
	The Question of "Design"
	The Anatomy of Sketching
	Clarity is not always the Path to Enlightenment
	The Larger Family of Renderings
	Experience Design vs. Interface Design
	Sketching Interaction
	Sketches are not Prototypes
	Where is the User in all of this?
	You make that Sound like a Negative Thing
	If Someone Made a Sketch in the Forest and Nobody Saw it?
	The Object of Sharing
	Annotation: Sketching on Sketches
	Design Thinking & Ecology
	The Second Worst Thing that Can Happen
	A River Runs Through It
PART II: STORIES OF METHODS AND MADNESS
	Introduction
	The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
	Chameleon: From Wizardry to Smoke-and-Mirrors
	Le Bricolage: Cobbling Things Together
	It was a Dark and Stormy Night?
	Visual Story Telling
	Simple Animation
	Shoot the Mime
	Sketch-a-Move
	Extending Interaction: Real and Illusion
	The Bifocal Display
	Video Invisionment
	Interacting with Paper
	Are you Talking to me?
PART III: RECAPITULATION & CODA
	Some Final Thoughts
PART IV: REFERENCES/BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bookmark: B.Norman.07
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Design of Future Things
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 2007
Pages: 240
Publisher: Basic Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-465-00228-5; 978-0-465-00228-3
Keywords: Human engineering; Industrial design, psychological aspects
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/the-design-of-future-things.html
Contents:
1. Cautious cars and cantankerous kitchens: how machines take control
2. The psychology of people & machines
3 Natural interaction
4. Servants of our machines
5 The role of automation
6 Communicating with our machines
7 The future of everyday things
Afterword: The machine's point of view
Summary of Design Rules

Bookmark: B.Blundell.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Creative 3-D display and interaction interfaces: a trans-disciplinary approach
Author: Blundell, Barry
Author: Schwarz, Adam J
Date: 2006
Pages: 371
Publisher: Wiley-Interscience
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-48271-4 (cloth: alk. paper) 0-471-48251-X
Contents:
ONE: THE NATURE OF THE QUEST
1.1	Introduction
1.2 Creative Display and Interaction Paradigms
1.3 A Little History
1.4 The Conventional Interface: Working in Flatlands
1.5 Inhibiting the Human-Computer Interaction Process
1.5.1 	Augmented Realism: Suspension of Disbelief
1.5.2 	Augmented Information Content
1.5.3 	Creative Design
1.6 Graphics Issues
1.6.1 Projection Geometry for a Single View
1.6.2 Surface Rendering
1.6.3 Working with Volumetric Data
1.7	Display Sub-systems
1.8 From the Laboratory to the Application
1.8.1 Development Strategies
1.8.2 Generality of Purpose
1.9	Discussion
1.9 Investigations
TWO: THE PERCEPTION OF OUR SPACE: VISION
2.1	Introduction
2.2 Some Facets of Light
2.2.1	Colour
2.2.2	Light Energy
2.2.3	Diffraction in Optical Systems
2.3	The Visual System
2.3.1	The Eye as an Optical instrument
2.3.2 The Retina
2.3.3 Eye Movements and Saccades
2.3.4 The Detection of Colour
2.4 Beyond the Eye
2.4.1 The Lateral Geniculate Nucleus
2.4.2 Reflex Feedback
2.4.3 The Primary Visual Cortex (V1)
2.4.4 The Dorsal and Ventral Pathways
2.4.5 The M and P Pathways
2.4.6 Detection of Binocular Disparity
2.5	Some Visual Characteristics
	2.5.1	The Visual Field
	2.5.2	Spatial Resolution
	2.5.3 	Sensitivity and the Impact of Spatial Frequency
2.6		Perception of Space and Form
2.6.1 	Pictorial Depth Cues
2.6.2 	Oculomotor and Parallax Cues
2.6.3 	Absolute and Relative Depth Perception
2.6.4 Consistency and Conflict Between Depth Cues
2.6.5 The Perception of Form
2.6.6 The Gestalt Theory of Visual Perception
2.6.7 The Pulfrich Effect
2.7		Temporal Resolution: Fusion and Motion
2.8		Discussion
2.9		Investigations
THREE: THE PERCEPTION OF OUR SPACE: HAPTICS
3.1 	Introduction
3.2		Somatosensory Receptors
3.3		Cutaneous Sensitivity
3.4		Propreoception
3.5		Somatosensory and Motor Pathways
3.6		Discussion
FOUR: A BACKWARD GLANCE
4.1 	Introduction
4.2	The Development of Perspective Techniques
4.3 The Transition to Perspective in Painting
4.4 Mathematical Schemes for Linear Perspective
4.5 	Evolving Ideas of Vision and Perception
4.6 	The Cameras Obscura and Lucida
4.7 Discussion
4.8 Investigations
FIVE: TRADITIONAL INTERACTION MECHANISMS
5.1	Introduction
5.2	An Early Evaluation of some Interaction Tools
	5.2.1 Interaction Space and a Tool Set
	5.2.2 Interaction Tool Evaluation
	5.2.3 Interaction Issues
5.3	Fitts' Model and its Application
	5.3.1 An Application of Fitts' Model
	5.3.2 Further Aspects of Fitts' Model
5.4	Interaction Paradigms
5.4.1	Transferred Interaction
5.4.2	Direct Interaction
5.4.3	Pointer-based interaction
5.5	Discussion
5.6	Investigations
SIX: DEPICTION AND INTERACTION OPPORTUNITIES
6.1 	Introduction
6.2 	A Traditional Classification of Creative 3-D displays
6.3 	Enhancing the Monocular Display
6.3.1 	Creating a Stereoscopic Display
6.3.2 Creating an Autostereoscopic Display
6.4 	The Geometry of Stereopsis
6.4.1 	Stereoscopic Fixation and the Horopter
6.4.2 Horizontal Disparity
6.4.3 Accommodation and Convergence
6.4.4	Vertical Disparity
6.5 	Some Classes of Autostereoscopic Display
6.5.1 	Virtual Reality Systems
6.5.2 	Multi-View Systems: The Lenticular Sheet
6.5.3 	AutoQ Systems
6.6 	Interaction Paradigms in 3-D Space
6.6.1 	Transferred Interaction
6.6.2 	Direct Interaction
6.6.3 	Pointer Based Interaction
6.7 	Working in a 3-D Space
6.7.1 	The Application of the Direct Interaction Technique
6.7.2 	Assisted Interaction within a 3-D Space
6.7.3 	User Mobility Issues
6.8 	The 'Free-Space' Image
6.8.1 A Theatrical Illusion
6.8.2 Volumetric Image Projection
6.9 	Revisiting the Traditional Classification Scheme
6.9.1 	A Multi-Faceted Approach
6.10 	Discussion
6.11 	Investigations
SEVEN: THE HAPTIC CHANNEL
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Physical Contact with Virtual Objects
	7.2.1 Some Example Applications of Haptic Interaction
	7.2.2 Some Examples of Haptic Interaction Devices
7.3 The Haptic Channel in Multi-Sensory Visualisation
	7.3.1 The Haptic Interaction Loop
	7.3.2 Force Feedback Refresh Requirements
7.4 Single-Point Haptic Interaction
	7.4.1 Collision Detection
	7.4.2 The Computation of Reaction Forces
	7.4.3 The Virtual Proxy
7.5 Increasing the Realism of Force Feedback
	7.5.1 Adding Frictional Forces
	7.5.2 Incorporating Haptic Texture
	7.5.3 Smoothing Polygon Edges by Force Shading
	7.5.4 Intermediate Representations
	7.5.4 More Complex Models, Torque and Deformable Objects
7.6 Haptic Interaction with Volumetric Data
	7.6.1 Exploration of Volumetric Data
	7.6.2 Smoother Force Feedback
	7.6.3 Additional Forces
	7.6.4 The Impression of Surfaces within Volumetric Images
	7.6.5 Modification of Volumetric Data
7.7 Multi-Channel Software Architectures
7.8 Discussion
7.9 Investigations
EIGHT: THE VISUAL CHANNEL
8.1	Introduction
8.2 Stereoscopic Display Techniques
8.2.1 Temporally Coded Systems
8.2.2 Chromatically Coded Systems
8.2.3 Spatially Coded Systems
8.2.4	Computation for Stereoscopic Views
8.3	Multi-view Systems and Electro-Holography
8.3.1 	Lenticular and Parallax Barrier Techniques
8.3.2 	Dynamic Multi-view Systems
8.3.3 	Electro-holography
8.4	Virtual Reality Systems
8.4.1	Immersive Virtual Reality
8.4.2	The CAVE and Cybersphere
8.4.3 Mixed Reality Techniques
8.4.4 Pepper's Ghost Revisited
8.5 The Volumetric Approach
8.5.1 Swept Volume Systems
8.5.2 Static Volume Systems
8.5.3 Varifocal Mirror Systems
8.6 	Discussion
8.7	Investigations
NINE: ADOPTING A CREATIVE APPROACH
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Two-Handed Interaction
9.2.1 Bi-manual Task Performance
9.2.2 The Potential Benefits of Bi-manual Interaction
9.3 Augmenting the Desktop Interface
9.4 Readings on Implementations and Applications
9.5 Discussion
APPENDIX A: CHIMENTI'S DRAWINGS
APPENDIX B: INTRODUCING HOLOGRAPHY

Bookmark: B.Keates.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing for Accessibility: A Business Guide to Countering Design Exclusion
Author: Keates, Simeon
Date: 2006
Pages: 184
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-6096-7 9780805860962 (cloth) 0-8058-6097-5 9780805860979 (paper)
Contents:
An Introduction to Designing for Accessibility
Making the Business Case for Accessibility
Implementing Design for Accessibility in Industry
The Role of Senior Management
The Role of Project Management
Filling the Skills Gap
Case Study: Making Expertise Available Within a Company
Putting Accessibility Into the Design Process
Case Study: Designing for Accessibility in Practice
Involving Users in the Design Process
Conducting Sessions With Users
Case Study: Investigating the Accessibility of Digital Television for Older Adults

Bookmark: B.Arnowitz.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Effective Prototyping for Software Makers
Author: Arnowitz, Jonathan
Author: Arent, Michael
Author: Berger, Nevin
Date: 2006
Pages: 584
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-088568-9, 978-0-12-088568-8
Weblink: Companion Web Site
Contents:
0: Preface: Effective Prototyping, why this book?
1: Why Prototyping
2: The effective prototyping process
3: Verify prototype assumptions and requirements
4: Develop Task Flows and Scenarios
5: Define prototype content and fidelity
6: Determine Characteristics
7: Choose a Method
8: Choose a Prototyping Tool
9: Establish the design criteria
10: Create the Design
11: Review the Design: the internal review
12: Validate and iterate the prototype
13: Deploy the design
14: Card sorting
15: Wireframe prototyping
16: Storyboard prototyping
17: Paper prototyping
18: Digital interactive prototyping
19: Blank model prototyping
20: Video prototyping
21: Wizard of Oz prototyping
22: Coded prototyping
23: Prototyping with office suite applications
24: Prototyping with Visio
25: Prototyping with Acrobat
26: Prototyping with Photoshop

Bookmark: B.SmithAtakan.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Smith-Atakan, Serengul
Date: 2006
Pages: 204
Publisher: Thomson
Standard number: ISBN: 1-84480-454-2, 978-184480454-2;
Weblink: www.thomsonlearning.co.uk/smith_atakan/
Contents:
1: Introduction
2: Natural computing
3: User modelling in the user-centredsystem design (UCSD)
4: The user-centred design process
5: Task analysis
6: Requirements gathering, storyboarding and prototyping
7: Psychology: memory
8: Cognitive psychology: perception
9: Evaluation
10: UCSD and advanced technology
11: Universal access and 'design for all'
12: Review

Bookmark: B.Jones.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Mobile interaction design
Author: Jones, Matt
Author: Marsden, Gary
Date: 2006
Pages: 377
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-09089-8
Contents:
1. POSSIBILITIES
Key Points
1.1. Introduction
1.2. What are mobile devices?
1.2.1. Communication or information device?
1.2.2. Appliance or Swiss-Army knife?
1.2.3. Cherished device or commodity tool?
1.3. Impoverished or extraordinary interfaces?
1.3.1. The Fast-tap keypad
1.3.2. Peephole displays
1.3.3. Accommodating human capabilities and limitations
1.4. Impoverishing interactions?
1.4.1. Reasons for poor design
1.4.2. Impacts of poor design
1.5. The rest of this book
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
2. Products for People
Key Points
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Useful
2.2.1 Function before form
2.2.2 Evolving uses
2.3 Useable
2.3.1 Usable in itself
2.3.2 Usable in the world
2.4 User experience
2.4.1 Interaction as brand
2.4.2 Interaction as package
2.5 Technology Acceptance
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
3. Innovation
Key Points
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Technology-centred approaches
3.3 Transferring from the desktop
3.3.1 Applications
3.3.2 Interface styles
3.4 Building on past mobile successes
3.5 Drama
3.6 Human-centred frameworks
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
4. Interaction design
Key Points
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Designing what? Designing how?
4.3 Understanding users
4.3.1 From biology to psychology
4.3.2 Field studies
4.3.3 Direct questioning
4.3.4 Distilling the findings
4.4 Developing prototype designs
4.4.1 Shaping and managing the design space
4.4.2 Prototyping
4.5 Evaluation
4.5.1 Testing with users
4.5.2 Testing in the absence of users
4.6 Iterative development
4.7 Multiple viewpoints
4.7.1 Many techniques & tools
4.7.2 Many disciplines
4.8 From interaction design to deployment
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
5. Watching, asking, probing
Key Points
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Focusing the study
5.2.1 How focused should you be?
5.2.2 Finding people to watch
5.3 Top people-understanding techniques
5.3.1 Observing
5.3.2 Enquiring
5.3.3 Diary studies
5.3.4 'Discount' field methods
5.3.5 Focus-groups
5.3.6 Creatively engaging approaches
5.4 Making sense of observations
5.4.1 Activities
5.4.2 Analysis perspectives
5.5 Personas and scenarios
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
6. PROTOTYPES
Key Points
6.1 Introduction
6.2 What is a prototype?
6.3 Different prototypes for different purposes
6.4 Low-fidelity
6.4.1 Self-checking
6.4.2 Communicating with others
6.4.3 Interaction Prototyping
6.4.4 Empowering Users
6.5 Higher-fidelity
6.5.1 Deciding what to prototype
6.5.2 Hardware and Software Integration
6.6 Finishing the process
6.6.1 Evolutionary
6.6.2 Revolutionary
6.6.3 Process
6.7 Issues in prototyping
6.7.1 Some considerations
6.8 A final note on development
6.9 Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
7. EVALUATION
Key Points
7.1 Overview
7.2 Classifying Evaluation
7.3 Quick and Dirty
7.4 Conceptual Model Extraction
7.5 Direct Observation
7.5.1 Finding out what users are thinking
7.5.2 How to record observations.
7.5.3 How to not bias the experiment
7.5.4 Happy users
7.6 Interviews
7.7 Questionnaires
7.8 Non-user methods
7.8.1 Heuristic Evaluation
7.8.2 No people whatsoever
7.9 Experimental evaluation
Experimental process
7.9.1 Hypothesis
7.9.2 The Users
7.9.3 Tasks
7.9.4 Experiment Design
7.9.5 Conducting Experiments
7.9.6 Experimental results.
7.10 Considering context - evaluating mobile systems.
7.10.1 Physical Context
7.10.2 Technology Context
7.10.3 Social Context
7.10.4 Other Contexts
7.11 Complimentary Evaluation
7.12 Conclusion
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
8. CONTROLLING COMPLEX FUNCTIONS
Key Points
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Menus and Memory
8.3 Hierarchical Menus
8.3.1 Learning Structure
8.3.2 Improving Classification
8.3.3 Context Information
8.4 Icons
8.5 Manuals
8.5.1 On-line manuals
8.5.2 Web site manuals
8.6 No menus?
8.6.1 Data Structures
8.6.2 Alternatives
8.6.3 Design Ideas - Data Structures
8.6.3 Evaluation via Experiment
8.7 More complex menus
8.8 Some concluding thoughts
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer tips
References
9. Information Access
Key Points
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Small Screen Impacts
9.2.1 Lessons from the past
9.2.2 Browsing problems
9.2.3 Searching issues
9.3 Designs for browsing
9.3.1 General guidelines
9.3.2 Simplifying access
9.3.3 Packaging content
9.4 Improving search
9.4.1 Assessing sets of results
9.4.2 Judging the value of individual results
9.5 Mobile information ecologies
9.5.1 Fitting-in
9.5.2 Case-study: the laid-back search system
9.5.3 Peer-to-peer approaches
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer tips
References
10. BEYOND TEXT - USING IMAGES ON MOBILE DEVICES
Key Points
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Ethnography
10.2.1 Where have all the photographs gone?
10.2.2 Digital ethnography
10.3 Finding photos
10.3.1 Metadata
10.3.2 Meta-data management
10.4 Photo Browsing
10.4.1 Timeline
10.4.2 Treemaps
10.4.3 RSVP
10.4.4 Speed Dependent Automatic Zooming
10.5 Downscaling case study
10.5.1 Arranging photos
10.5.2 Screen size
10.5.3 Write once, run anywhere
10.5.4 Meanwhile, back with the users
10.5.5 AutoZoom
GestureZoom
10.5.6 User Testing
10.5.7 Platform
10.6 Advanced technology
10.7 What are photos for?
10.7.1 What are we sharing?
10.7.2 Using audio with photographs
10.7.3 Video
11. IMPACTING THE COMMUNITY; IMPACTING THE WORLD
Key Points
11.1 Introduction
11.2 The Digital Divide
11.3 Mobiles work
11.3.1 The rise and rise of mobile technology
11.4 Planning a project
Real Access:
11.5 That Culture Thing
11.5 Case Studies
11.5.1 Empowering people - Cybertracker
11.5.2 Education
11.5.3 Communitization
11.6 Call to arms
Summary
Workshop Questions
Designer Tips
REFERENCES
RESOURCES

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Prioritizing Web Usability
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Author: Loranger, Hoa
Date: 2006
Pages: 406
Publisher: New Riders Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-321-35031-6, 978-0-321-35031-2
Weblink: www.useit.com/prioritizing/
Contents:
0.Preface
	What is Usability?
	Where to Find Detailed User Research
	Usability Then and Now
	Who Should Read This Book?
1.Introduction: Nothing To Hide
	Where We Got Our Data
	Tell Me Again: Why Do I Need to Do User Testing?
2.The Web User Experience
	How Well Do People Use the Web?
	User Satisfaction with Web Sites
	How People Use Sites
	Search Dominance
	Scrolling
	Complying With Design Conventions and Usability Guidelines
	Information Foraging
3.Revisiting Early Web Usability Findings
	Problems That Haven't Changed
	Technological Change: Its Impact on Usability
	Adaptation: How Users Have Influenced Usability
	Restraint: How Designers Have Alleviated Usability Problems
	Assessing the Fate of the Early Findings
4.Prioritizing Your Usability Problems
	How Severe Is the Problem?
	Scoring Severity
	What Makes Problems Severe
	The Scale of Misery
	Why Users Fail
	Is It Enough to Focus on the Worst Problems?
5.Search
	How to Know if You Need Search
	The State of Search
	How Search Should Work
	Search Interface
	Search Engine Results Pages
	Search Engine Optimization
6.Navigation and Information Architecture
	Am I There Yet?
	Match the Site Structure to User Expectations
	Navigation: Be Consistent
	Navigation: Beware the Coolness Factor
	Reduce Clutter and Avoid Redundancy
	Links and Label Names: Be Specific
	Vertical Dropdown Menus: Short Is Sweet
	Multilevel Menus: Less is More
	Can I Click on It?
	Direct Access From the Homepage
7.Typography: Readability & Legibility
	The Downside of Dummy Type
	Four Top Guidelines for Type
	Body Text: The Ten-Point Rule
	Relative Specifications
	Mixing Fonts and Colors
	Text Images
	Moving Text
8.Writing for the Web
	How Poor Writing Makes Web Sites Fail
	Understanding How Web Users Read
	Writing for Your Reader
	Formatting Text for Readability
9.Providing Good Product Information
	Where To Display Prices
	Show Me the Money
	Win Customer Confidence
	Support Comparison Shopping
	Support Sales with Quality Content
10.Presenting Page Elements
	When the "Three-Click Rule" Wreaks Havoc
	Should You Design for Scrolling?
	Guiding Users, Step by Step
	Keep Like with Like
	Satisfy Your Users' Expectations
	Using White Space
11.Balancing Technology with People's Needs
	Flashback to 2000
	Use Multimedia When It Benefits Your Audience
	Overcoming Barriers to Multimedia
	Stick to Familiar Interface Conventions
	Avoid Multimedia Excesses
	Make Videos for the Web
	The Practice of Simplicity
	Toward a More Elegant Design
12.Final Thoughts: Design That Works
13.Index

Bookmark: B.Thatcher.06
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Accessibility: Web Standards and Regulatory Compliance
Author: Thatcher, Jim
Date: 2006
Pages: 696
Publisher: Friends of Ed
Standard number: ISBN: 1-59059638-2
Weblink: jimthatcher.com/
Contents:
PART 1: THE IMPACT OF WEB ACCESSIBILITY
1: Understanding Web Accessibility
2: Overview of Law and Guidelines
3: Implementing Accessibility in the Enterprise
2: IMPLEMENTING ACCESSIBLE WEBSITES
4: Overview of Accessible Technologies
5: Assistive Technology: Screen Readers and Browsers
6: Accessible Content
7: Accessible Navigation
8: Accessible Data Input
9: CSS for Accessible Web Pages
10: Accessible JavaScript
11: Accessible Flash
12: PDF Accessibility
13: Accessibility Testing
14: Introduction to WCAG 2.0
15: Retrofitting Case Study: Redesign of a University Website
3: ACCESSIBILITY LAW AND POLICY
16: U.S. Web Accessibility Law in Depth
17: Worldwide Accessibility Laws and Policies
A: Glossary of Terms
B: Guide to the Section 508 Standards for Electronic and Information Technology
C: Overview of PAS 78 Guide to Good Practice in Commissioning Accessible Websites

Bookmark: B.Lazar.2006
Bookmark: B.Lazar.2005
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Usability: A User-Centered Design Approach
Author: Lazar, Jonathan
Date: 2006
Pages: 394
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: Pearson Addison Wesley
Standard number: ISBN: 0-321-32135-9
Contents:
Introduction to Web usability
Defining the mission and target user population
Requirements gathering: what information is needed?
Methods for requirements gathering
Information architecture and site navigation
Page design
Designing for universal usability
Physical design
Usability testing
Implementation and marketing
Maintaining and evaluating Web sites

Bookmark: B.Helander.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Guide to Human Factors and Ergonomics
Author: Helander, Martin
Date: 2005
Pages: 408
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: iSBN: 0-415-28248-9; 9780415282482
Note: Second Edition
Contents:
INFORMATION-CENTERED
	Introduction to Human Factors and Ergonomics
	Cost Benefit Analysis of Improvements in the Human Factor Design
	Conducting a Human Factor Investigation
	Vision and Illumination Design
	Human Information Processing
	Design of Controls, Displays, and Symbols
	Design of Human Computer Interaction
HUMAN-BODY-CENTERED
	Anthropometry in Workstation Design
	Work Posture
	Manual Materials Handling
	Repetitive Motion Injury and Design of Hand Tools
	Physical Workload and Heat Stress
	Noise and Vibration
ORGANIZATION/MANAGEMENT-CENTERED
	Ergonomics of Computer Workstations
	Training, Skills, and Cognitive Task Analysis
	Shift Work
	Design for Manufacture and Maintenance
	Accidents, Human Errors and Safety
	References
	Appendix: The Use of Human Factors/ Ergonomics Checklists
	Index

Bookmark: B.Horton.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Access by Design: A Guide to Universal Usability for Web Designers
Author: Horton, Sarah
Date: 2005
Pages: 288
Publisher: New Riders Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32131140-X
Weblink: universalusability.com/access_by_design/
Contents:
Fundamentals
	Introduction
	Design simply
	Build well
	Favor HTML over other formats
	Design for keyboard access
	Design for tansformation
	Allow users to control their environment
Document Structure
	Introduction
	Separate content and presentation
	Mark up document structure
	Use style sheets for presentation
	Design pages that function without style sheets
	Write valid code
	Use linked style sheets
Text
	Introduction
	Use plain text for text
	Use CSS for styling text
	Allow user settings to define base text size
	Size other text elements relative to the user-defined text size
	Design pages that can accommodate different text sizes
	Maintain contrast between text and background
	Use style sheets for setting text color
	Do not use text color alone to convey information
	Mark up text using structural tags
	Use structural markup appropriately
Images
	Introduction
	Use images purposefully
	Do not use graphic text
	Avoid animated images
	Provide alt-text for all relevant images
	Provide a full text description for content images
	Provide blank alt-text for irrelevant or redundant images
	Maintain a catalog of image content
	Keep image dimensions as small as possible
	Use thumbnails for large images
Data Tables
	Introduction
	Use table markup for data
	Simplify data table layouts
	Identify data table row and column headings
	Use CAPTION and SUMMARY to describe data tables
	Layout Tables
	Introduction
	Use tables for layout only when necessary
	Use simple layout tables
	Use only basic table tags
	Design layout tables for linear access
	Use flexible cell widths
Frames
	Introduction
	Avoid using frames
	Use frame titles to identify the function of each frame
	Provide an alternative to frames
Lists
	Introduction
	Use list markup for lists
	Avoid compound lists
Forms
	Introduction
	Design simple and clear forms
	Provide an alternate to forms
	Label form fields
	Associate related form fields
	Design forms for keyboard accessibility
	Apply a logical sequence to form elements
	Don't auto-populate form fields with text
	Use form elements correctly
Links
	Introduction
	Use text for links
	Use descriptive link text
	Underline links that are not otherwise identifiable as links
	Differentiate visited and unvisited links
	Provide "you are here" orientation cues
	Use alt-text for image links
Color
	Introduction
	Select contrasting colors for greatest legibility
	Don't use color alone to convey meaning
	Allow users to override color settings
Audio and Video
	Introduction
	Provide text for audio content
	Provide descriptions for video content
	Provide alternate formats for media-based content
	Make media keyboard accessible
	Allow users to control media playback
Interactivity
	Introduction
	Use add-ons for interactivity only when necessary
	Allow users to control the user interface
	Make interactivity keyboard-accessible
	Provide an accessible alternate when using a nonstandard format
Editorial Style
	Introduction
	Break up text into segments
	Start sentences, headings, and links with keywords
	Adopt a writing style that is clear and to the point
	Use appropriate language and terminology
	Keep content current and links functional
	Mark up language changes within a document
	Identify and describe abbreviations and acronyms
	Provide a print option for lengthy documents
Page Layout
	Introduction
	Design pages for linear access
	Communicate visual information to nonvisual users
	Apply a consistent design
	Balance content and navigation
	Provide navigation tools
	Design flexible page layouts
	Use style sheets for layout whenever possible
	Provide direct access to page content

Bookmark: B.Benyon.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing interactive systems: people, activities, contexts, technologies
Author: Benyon, David
Author: Turner, Phil
Author: Turner, Susan
Date: 2005
Pages: 789
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32111629-1

Bookmark: B.Tidwell.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing interfaces: Patterns for Effective Interaction Design
Author: Tidwell, Jenifer
Date: 2005
Pages: 331
Publisher: O'Reilly
Standard number: ISBN: 0-59600803-1 978-0596008031
Weblink: Booksite

Bookmark: B.Silver.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Exploring interface design
Author: Silver, Marc
Date: 2005
Pages: 336
Publisher: Thomson/Delmar Learning
Standard number: ISBN: 1-40183739-5
Contents:
1. Realizing the Power of Multimedia and the Web
2. The Art of Designing Elegant Software
3. The User Interface Design Process
4. Goal Setting and Needs Assessment
5. Creativity and Idea Generation
6. Menus and Controls
7. Designing Usable Navigation
8. Solving Design Problems
9. Visual Considerations
10. Writing for Usability
11. Designing for Accessibility
12. Specifying the Design
13. Performing Usability Testing
14. The User Interface Designer in Professional Practice

Bookmark: B.Ware.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Visualization: Perception for Design
Author: Ware, Colin
Date: 2005
Pages: 486
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-819-2, 978-1-55860-819-1
Contents:
1: Foundation for a Science of Data Visualization
2: The Environment, Optics, Resolution, and the Display
3: Lightness, Brightness, Contrast, and Constancy
4: Color
5: Visual attention and information that Pops Out
6: Static and Moving Patterns
7: Visual Objects and Data Objects
8: Space Perception and the Display of Data in Space
9: Images, Words, and Gestures
10: Interacting with Visualizations
11: Thinking with Visualization
Appendix A: Changing Primaries
Appendix B: CIE Color Measurement System
Appendix C: The Perceptual Evaluation of Visualization Techniques and Systems

Bookmark: B.Downes.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interactive realism: the poetics of Cyberspace
Author: Downes, Daniel M.
Date: 2005
Pages: 192
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-77352920-9 (pbk.) 0-77352854-7 (bound)
Contents:
Introduction: The Inventio Fortunata xi
1 The Dual Specificity of Cyberspace 3
2 The Magic Mirror: Technology and the Transformative Turn  17
3 Media Ecology, the Prosthetic Other, and the Artifactual Self 37
4 Virtuality and the Bit Republic 70
5 The Iconic Landscapes of Cyberspace 101
6 From Public Image to Public Memory: Building
Heterotopia 122
Conclusion: The Fortunes of Invention 139

Bookmark: B.DeSousa.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The semiotic engineering of human-computer interaction
Author: De Souza, Clarisse Sieckenius
Date: 2005
Pages: 283
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-26204220-7
Contents:
I FOUNDATION
1 Introduction
2 Fundamental Concepts in Semiotics
3 Semiotic Engineering
II DERIVATION
4 Communicability and the Designer's Deputy Discourse
5 The Semiotic Engineering of Customizable and Extensible Applications
6 The Semiotic Engineering of Multi-User Computer Applications
III QUESTIONS
7 Reflection

Bookmark: B.Love.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Understanding mobile human-computer interaction
Author: Love, Steve
Date: 2005
Pages: 203
Publisher: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinmann
Standard number: ISBN: 0-75066352-9
Contents:
Introduction to Mobile Human--Computer Interaction
User Characteristics
Research Methods
HCI Research Methods
Design Issues for Mobile Systems
Social Usability
Research Guidelines for Projects
Data Analysis
Conclusions

Bookmark: B.Stone.05
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Design and Evaluation
Series Title: Interactive Technologies
Author: Stone, Debbie
Author: Jarrett, Caroline
Author: Woodroffe, Mark
Author: Minocha, Shailey
Date: 2005
Pages: 704
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Standard number: ISBN: 0120884364

Bookmark: B.Ivory.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Automated Web Site Evaluation - Researchers' and Practitioners' Perspectives
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series, Vol. 4
Author: Ivory, M. Y.
Date: 2004
Pages: 225
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-4020-1672-7

Bookmark: B.Longoria.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Software for the Mobile Context: A Practitioner's Guide
Author: Longoria, Roman
Date: 2004
Pages: 152
Publisher: Springer
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85233785-0
Contents:
1. Designing applications for 3G mobile devices
2. Designing voice applications
3. Designing J2ME applications: MIDP and UI design
4. Designing multimodel applications
5. Heurisitcs for designing mobile applications
6. A development process for advanced user interfaces of wireless mobile devices

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Author: Plaisant, Catherine
Date: 2004
Pages: 672
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32-119786-0
Note: 4th edition
Weblink: wps.aw.com/aw_shneider_dtui_4

Bookmark: B.Norman.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Emotional design: why we love (or hate) everyday things
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 2004
Pages: 256
Publisher: Basic Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-465-05135-9
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/emotional-design-why-we-love-or-hate-everyday-things.html
Contents:
Prologue: Three Teapots
Part I. The meaning of things
I. ATTRACTIVE THINGS WORK BETTER
The multiple faces of emotion and design
PART II: DESIGN IN PRACTICE
3. Three levels of design: visceral, behavioral, and reflective
4. Fun and games
5. People, places and things
6. Emotional machines
7. The future of robots
Epilogue: we are all designers
Personal Reflections and Acknowledgments

Bookmark: B.Colmenarez.2004
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Facial Analysis from Continuous Video with Applications to Human-Computer Interface
Series Title: International Series on Biometrics 2
Author: Colmenarez, Antonio J.
Author: Xiong, Ziyou
Author: Huang, Thomas S.
Date: 2004
Number of Chapters: 9
Pages: 123
Publisher: Springer US
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/b101848
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-4020-7802-6 (print), 978-1-4020-7803-3 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Introduction (1-4)
Information-based Maximum Discrimination (5-14)
Face and Facial Feature Detection (15-23)
Face and Facial Feature Tracking (25-33)
Face and Facial Expression Recognition (35-41)
3-D Model-based Image Communication (43-73)
Implementations, Experiments and Results (75-115)
Application in an Audio-visual Person Recognition System (117-120)
Conclusions (121-123)

Bookmark: B.Dix.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Dix, Alan J.
Author: Finlay, Janet E.
Author: Abowd, Gregory D.
Author: Beale, Russell
Date: 2004
Date: 2003
Pages: 834
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-046109-1
Note: 3rd Edition
Weblink: www.hcibook.com/e3/
Contents:
Introduction
Part 1 FOUNDATIONS
1 The human
	1.1 Introduction
	1.2 Input-output channels
	1.3 Human memory
	1.4 Thinking: reasoning and problem solving
	1.5 Emotion
	1.6 Individual differences
	1.7 Psychology and the design of interactive systems
	1.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
2 The computer
	2.1 Introduction
	2.2 Text entry devices
	2.3 Positioning, pointing and drawing
	2.4 Display devices
	2.5 Devices for virtual reality and 3D interaction
	2.6 Physical controls, sensors and special devices
	2.7 Paper: printing and scanning
	2.8 Memory
	2.9 Processing and networks
	2.10 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
3 The interaction
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 Models of interaction
	3.3 Frameworks and HCI
	3.4 Ergonomics
	3.5 Interaction styles
	3.6 Elements of the WIMP interface
	3.7 Interactivity
	3.8 The context of the interaction
	3.9 Experience, engagement and fun
	3.10 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
4 Paradigms
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 Paradigms for interaction
	4.3 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
Part 2 DESIGN PROCESS
5 Interaction design basics
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 What is design?
	5.3 The process of design
	5.4 User focus
	5.5 Scenarios
	5.6 Navigation design
	5.7 Screen design and layout
	5.8 Iteration and prototyping
	5.9 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
6 HCI in the software process
	6.1 Introduction
	6.2 The software life cycle
	6.3 Usability engineering
	6.4 Iterative design and prototyping
	6.5 Design rationale
	6.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
7 Design rules
	7.1 Introduction
	7.2 Principles to support usability
	7.3 Standards
	7.4 Guidelines
	7.5 Golden rules and heuristics
	7.6 HCI patterns
	7.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
8 Implementation support
	8.1 Introduction
	8.2 Elements of windowing systems
	8.3 Programming the application
	8.4 Using toolkits
	8.5 User interface management systems
	8.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
9 Evaluation techniques
	9.1 What is evaluation?
	9.2 Goals of evaluation
	9.3 Evaluation through expert analysis
	9.4 Evaluation through user participation
	9.5 Choosing an evaluation method
	9.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
10 Universal design
	10.1 Introduction
	10.2 Universal design principles
	10.3 Multi-modal interaction
	10.4 Designing for diversity
	10.5 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
11 User support
	11.1 Introduction
	11.2 Requirements of user support
	11.3 Approaches to user support
	11.4 Adaptive help systems
	11.5 Designing user support systems
	11.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
Part 3 MODELS AND THEORIES
12 Cognitive models
	12.1 Introduction
	12.2 Goal and task hierarchies
	12.3 Linguistic models
	12.4 The challenge of display-based systems
	12.5 Physical and device models
	12.6 Cognitive architectures
	12.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
13 Socio-organizational issues and stakeholder requirements
	13.1 Introduction
	13.2 Organizational issues
	13.3 Capturing requirements
	13.4 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
14 Communication and collaboration models
	14.1 Introduction
	14.2 Face-to-face communication
	14.3 Conversation
	14.4 Text-based communication
	14.5 Group working
	14.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
15 Task analysis
	15.1 Introduction
	15.2 Differences between task analysis and other techniques
	15.3 Task decomposition
	15.4 Knowledge-based analysis
	15.5 Entity-relationship-based techniques
	15.6 Sources of information and data collection
	15.7 Uses of task analysis
	15.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
16 Dialog notations and design
	16.1 What is dialog?
	16.2 Dialog design notations
	16.3 Diagrammatic notations
	16.4 Textual dialog notations
	16.5 Dialog semantics
	16.6 Dialog analysis and design
	16.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
17 Models of the system
	17.1 Introduction
	17.2 Standard formalisms
	17.3 Interaction models
	17.4 Continuous behavior
	17.5 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
18 Modeling rich interaction
	18.1 Introduction
	18.2 Status-event analysis
	18.3 Rich contexts
	18.4 Low intention and sensor-based interaction
	18.5 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
Part 4 OUTSIDE THE BOX
19 Groupware
	19.1 Introduction
	19.2 Groupware systems
	19.3 Computer-mediated communication
	19.4 Meeting and decision support systems
	19.5 Shared applications and artifacts
	19.6 Frameworks for groupware
	19.7 Implementing synchronous groupware
	19.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
20 Ubiquitous computing and augmented realities
	20.1 Introduction
	20.2 Ubiquitous computing applications research
	20.3 Virtual and augmented reality
	20.4 Information and data visualization
	20.5 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading
21 Hypertext, multimedia and the world wide web
	21.1 Introduction
	21.2 Understanding hypertext
	21.3 Finding things
	21.4 Web technology and issues
	21.5 Static web content
	21.6 Dynamic web content
	21.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended reading

Bookmark: B.Holtzblatt.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Rapid Contextual Design: A how-to guide to key techniques for user-centered design
Author: Holtzblatt, Karen
Author: Wendell, Jessamyn Burns
Author: Wood, Shelley
Date: 2004
Pages: 320
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12354051-8
Contents:
1: Introduction
2: Planning Your Rapid CD Project
3: Planning Your Contextual Interviews
4: The Contextual Inquiry Interview
5: Contextual Interview Interpretation Session
6: Work Modeling
7: Consolidating Sequence Models
8: Building an Affinity Diagram
9: Using Contextual Data to Write Personas
10: Walking the Affinity and Consolidated Sequences
11: Visioning a New Way to Work
12: Storyboarding
13: Testing with Paper Prototypes
14: Paper Prototype Interviews
15: Rapid CD and Other Methodologies
16: Issues of Organizational Adoption
Appendix: Suggested Supply Checklist
Absract: This handbook introduces Rapid Contextual Design, a fast-paced, adaptive form of Contextual Design. It's a hands-on guide for anyone who needs practical direction on how to use the Contextual Design process and adapt it to tactical projects with tight timelines. Rapid Contextual Design provides detailed suggestions on structuring the project and customer interviews, conducting interviews, and running interpretation sessions. The handbook also walks you step-by-step through the consolidation process, along with visioning, storyboarding, and paper prototype interviewing. Throughout the handbook there are actual examples from real projects run by InContext clients. Each chapter includes Tips and Do's and Don'ts, as well as guidance on what to think about and watch out for while running your project. The handbook also addresses how to fit the Contextual Design process into existing product development processes like RUP and XP and how to use Contextual Design data to create personas.

Bookmark: B.Lowgren.04
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Thoughtful Interaction Design: A Design Perspective on Information Technology
Author: Lowgren, Jonas
Author: Stolterman, Erik
Date: 2004
Pages: 240
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-12271-5; 0-262-62209-2 (2007 paper)
Contents:
1 Introduction (1)
2 The Process (15)
3 The Designer (43)
4 Methods and Techniques (63)
5 The Product and Its Use Qualities (101)
6 Conditions for Interaction Design (141)
7 Thoughtful Design (165)

Bookmark: B.Meister.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Conceptual Foundations of Human Factors Measurement
Author: Meister, David
Date: 2003
Pages: 256
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-4135-0
Contents:
Basic Premises and Principles
Measurement Problems
The Conceptual Structure of the HF Professional
Unmanaged Performance Measurement
The Experiment and Other Objective Methods
Subjective and Related Methods
Measures
Research Users
Final Thoughts

Bookmark: B.Kuniavsky.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Observing the User Experience: A Practitioner's Guide to User Research
Author: Kuniavsky, Mike
Date: 2003
Pages: 576
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
Standard number: ISBN: 1-5586-0923-7, 978-1-5586-0923-5
Contents:
Part I: Why research is good and how it fits into product development
1. Typhoon: a fable
2. Do a usability test now!
3. Balancing needs through iterative development
4. The user experience
PART II: User experience research techniques
5. The research plan
6. Universal tools: recruiting and interviewing
7. User profiles
8. Contextual inquiry, task analysis, card sorting
9. Focus groups
10. Usability tests
11. Surveys
12. Ongoing relationship
13. Log files and customer support
14. Competitive research
15. Others' hard work: published information and consultants
16. Emerging techniques
PART III: Communicating results
17. Reports and presentations
18. Creating a user-centered corporate culture
Appendix A: The budget research lab
Appendix B: Common survey questions
Appendix C: Observer instructions

Bookmark: B.Schreck.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Security and Privacy in User Modeling
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series, Vol. 2
Author: Schreck, J.
Date: 2003
Pages: 232
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-4020-1130-X

Bookmark: B.Ackerman.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Sharing Expertise: Beyond Knowledge Management
Author: Ackerman, Mark
Author: Pipek, Volkmar
Author: Wulf, Volker
Date: 2003
Pages: 426
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-01195-6
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/0262011956
Absract: The field of knowledge management focuses on how organizations can most effectively store, manage, retrieve, and enlarge their intellectual properties. The repository view of knowledge management emphasizes the gathering, providing, and filtering of explicit knowledge. The information in a repository has the advantage of being easily transferable and reusable. But it is not easy to use decontextualized information, and users often need access to human experts. This book describes a more recent approach to knowledge management, which the authors call "expertise sharing." Expertise sharing emphasizes the human aspects--cognitive, social, cultural, and organizational--of knowledge management, in addition to information storage and retrieval. Rather than focusing on the management level of an organization, expertise sharing focuses on the self-organized activities of the organization's members. The book addresses the concerns of both researchers and practitioners, describing current literature and research as well as offering information on implementing systems. It consists of three parts: an introduction to knowledge sharing in large organizations; empirical studies of expertise sharing in different types of settings; and detailed descriptions of computer systems that can route queries, assemble people and work, and augment naturally occurring social networks within organizations.

Bookmark: B.King.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Speed Up Your Site: Web Site Optimization
Author: King, Andrew B.
Author: Balashov, Konstantin
Author: Wolf, Jason
Date: 2003
Pages: 496
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7357-1324-3
Weblink: www.websiteoptimization.com/
Contents:
Part I - The Psychology of Performance
	Chapter 1 - Response Time: Eight Seconds, Plus or Minus Two
	Chapter 2 - Flow in Web Design (PDF)
Part II - Optimizing Markup: HTML and XHTML
	Chapter 3 - HTML Optimization
	Chapter 4 - Advanced HTML Optimization
	Chapter 5 - Extreme XHTML
	Chapter 6 - Case Study: PopularMechanics.com
Part III - DHTML Optimization: CSS and JavaScript
	Chapter 7 - CSS Optimization
	Chapter 8 - Advanced CSS Optimization
	Chapter 9 - Optimizing JavaScript for Download Speed
	Chapter 10 - Optimizing JavaScript for Execution Speed (HTML)
	Chapter 11 - Case Study: DHTML.com
Part IV - Graphics and Multimedia Optimization
	Chapter 12 - Optimizing Web Graphics
	Chapter 13 - Minimizing Multimedia
	Chapter 14 - Case Study: Apple.com
Part V - Search Engine Optimization
	Chapter 15 - Keyword Optimization
	Chapter 16 - Case Studies: PopularMechanics.com and iProspect.com
Part VI - Advanced Optimization Techniques
	Chapter 17 - Server-Side Techniques
	Chapter 18 - Compressing the Web
	Chapter 19 - Case Studies: Yahoo.com and WebReference.com

Bookmark: B.Lidwell.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Universal Principles of Design: 100 ways to enhance usability, influence perception, increase appeal, make better design decisions, and teach through design
Author: Lidwell, William
Author: Holden, Kritina
Author: Butler, Jill
Date: 2003
Pages: 216
Publisher: Rockport Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-59253-007-9
Weblink: www.stuffcreators.com/UPOD.html

Bookmark: B.Braun.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability: The Site Speaks for Itself
Author: Braun, Kelly
Author: Gadney, Max
Author: Haughey, Matthew
Author: Roselli, Adrian
Author: Synstelien, Don
Author: Walter, Tom
Author: Wertheimer, David
Author: Holzschlag, Molly E.
Author: Lawson, Bruce
Date: 2003
Pages: 300
Publisher: glasshaus
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415103-5

Bookmark: B.McCracken.03
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Website Development: A Human-Computer Interaction Approach
Author: McCracken, Daniel D.
Author: Wolfe, Rosalee J.
Author: Spool, Jared M.
Date: 2003
Pages: 336
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-041161-2

Bookmark: B.Chi.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Framework for Visualizing Information
Series Title: Human-Computer Interaction Series, Vol. 1
Author: Chi, E. H.
Date: 2002
Pages: 176
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-4020-0589-X
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Data State Reference Model
3. Validation of Model
4. Expressiveness of Data State Model
5. Visualization Spreadsheet Illustrated
6. Detailed Case Study: Web Analysis Visualization Spreadsheet
7. Implementation Experience
8. Related Work
9. Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Moulton.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Accessible technology in today's business: case studies for success
Author: Moulton, Gary
Date: 2002
Pages: 235
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-73561501-2

Bookmark: B.Yunker.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Beyond Borders: Web Globalization Strategies
Author: Yunker, John
Date: 2002
Pages: 576
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7357-1208-5
Weblink: www.bytelevel.com/beyondborders/
Contents:
PART I THINKING GLOBALLY
	1 One Internet; Many Voices
	2 Navigating the Multilingual Internet
PART II PREPARATION
	3 First Steps -- and Missteps
	4 Are You Ready to Go Global?
PART III IMPLEMENTATION
	5 Web Globalization Workflow
	6 Let's Talk Budget
	7 Internationalization and Localization
PART IV TEXT AND TRANSLATION
	8 Translation Management
	9 Computer-Aided Translation (CAT)
	10 Writing for a Global Audience
PART V DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND MANAGEMENT
	11 World Wide Design
	12 Creating Multilingual Content
	13 Global Content Management
PART VI BEYOND THE WEB
	14 Mastering Your (Country) Domain
	15 Supporting International Customers
	16 Promoting Your Site Globally
	17 The Future of Web Globalization
PART VII APPENDIXES
	A Glossary
	B Global Color Chart
	C Character Entities
	D Language and Country Codes
	E Encodings
	F International Notation Standards

Bookmark: B.Beaumont.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Constructing Usable Web Menus
Author: Beaumont, Andy
Author: Gibbons, Dave
Author: Kerr, Jody
Author: Stephens, Jon
Date: 2002
Pages: 200
Publisher: Wrox Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415102-7

Bookmark: B.Thatcher.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Constructing accessible web sites
Author: Thatcher, Jim
Author: Waddell, Cynthia
Author: Henry, Shawn
Author: Swierenga, Sarah
Author: Urban, Mark
Author: Burks, Michael
Author: Regan, Bob
Author: Bohman, Paul
Date: 2002
Pages: 415
Publisher: glasshaus
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415100-0
Weblink: www.glasshaus.com/bookInfo.asp
Contents:
1  Understanding Web Accessibility
2  Overview of Law and Guidelines
3  Assistive Technology, Browsers and Accessibility
4  Creating Accessible Content
5  Accessible Navigation
6  Accessible Data Input
7  Testing for Section 508 Compliance
8  Web Development Tools and Accessibility
9  Separating Content from Presentation
10  Accessibility and Macromedia Flash
11  Implementing Accessibility in Enterprise
12  Emerging Technologies
13  US Web Accessibility Law in Depth
A  Quick Reference Guide
B  Glossary of Terms
C  Section 508 Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Isaacs.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing from both sides of the screen: how designers and engineers can collaborate to build cooperative technology
Author: Isaacs, Ellen
Author: Walendowski, Alan
Date: 2002
Pages: 336
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67232151-3
Contents:
The Goal
    1 On Being a Butler
    2 Don't Impose: Respect Physical Effort
    3 Don't Impose: Respect Mental Effort
    4 Be Helpful
The Process
    5 Setting Up: Understanding Users' Needs
    6 Structuring the User Interface
    7 Laying Out the User Interface
    8 Architecting with the UI in Mind
    9 Initial Development
    10 Iterative Development: Observing Use
    11 Conclusion
Appendixes
    A Guidelines
    B Recommended Readings

Bookmark: B.International.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing International Software
Author: International, Dr.
Date: 2002
Pages: 1040
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7356-1583-7
Weblink: www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/5717.asp
Contents:
PART I  INTRODUCTION
1  Understanding Internationalization
2  Designing a World-Ready Program
PART II  GLOBALIZATION
3  Unicode
4  Locale and Cultural Awareness
5  Text Input, Output, and Display
6  Multilingual User Interface (MUI)
PART III  LOCALIZABILITY
7  Software Localizability Guidelines
8  Mirroring
9  Content Localizability Guidelines
PART IV  LOCALIZATION
10  Localization
PART V  TESTING
11  Testing for World-Readiness
12  Testing Localizability with Pseudo-Localization
PART VI  TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGY
13  Graphics Device Interface Plus (GDI+)
14  Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
15  Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) and Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP)
16  Microsoft Office
17  MLang
18  Microsoft Layer for Unicode (MSLU)
19  The Microsoft .NET Framework
20  OpenType Fonts
21  Rich Edit
22  Microsoft SQL Server
23  Microsoft Windows Text Services Framework (TSF)
24  Uniscribe
25  Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
26  Extensible Markup Language (XML)

Bookmark: B.Weiss.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Handheld Usability
Author: Weiss, Scott
Date: 2002
Pages: 271
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-84446-9
Weblink: handheldusability.info/
Contents:
1: Handheld vs. Desktop
2: Handheld Devices
3: Information Architecture: Process
4: Information Architecture: Practice
5: Prototyping
6: Usability Testing
A: Paper Prototyping the Palm OS
B: Sample Respondent Screener
C: Sample Discussion Guide
D: Usability Testing Case Study
E: Handheld History

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Homepage usability: 50 websites deconstructed
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Author: Tahir, Marie
Date: 2002
Pages: 315
Publisher: New Riders
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7357-1102-X
Weblink: www.useit.com/homepageusability/

Bookmark: B.Rosenfeld.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web
Author: Rosenfeld, Louis
Author: Morville, Peter
Date: 2002
Pages: 486
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-596-00035-9
Note: Second Edition
Weblink: www.oreilly.com/catalog/infotecture2/
Contents:
Part I. Introducing Information Architecture
1. Defining Information Architecture
      A Definition
      Tablets, Scrolls, Books, and Libraries
      Explaining IA to Others
      What Isn't Information Architecture?
      Why Information Architecture Matters
      Bringing Our Work to Life
2. Practicing Information Architecture
      Do We Need Information Architects?
      Who's Qualified to Practice Information Architecture?
      Information Architecture Specialists
      Practicing Information Architecture in the Real World
      Information Ecologies
      What Lies Ahead
3. User Needs and Behaviors
      The "Too-Simple" Information Model
      Information Needs
      Information Seeking Behaviors
Part II. Basic Principles of Information Architecture
4. The Anatomy of an Information Architecture
      Visualizing Information Architecture
      Information Architecture Components
5. Organization Systems
      Challenges of Organizing Information
      Organizing Web Sites and Intranets
      Organization Schemes
      Organization Structures
      Creating Cohesive Organization Systems
6. Labeling Systems
      Why You Should Care About Labeling
      Varieties of Labels
      Designing Labels
7. Navigation Systems
      Types of Navigation Systems
      Gray Matters
      Browser Navigation Features
      Building Context
      Improving Flexibility
      Embedded Navigation Systems
      Supplemental Navigation Systems
      Advanced Navigation Approaches
8. Search Systems
      Does Your Site Need Search?
      Basic Search System Anatomy
      Choosing What to Search
      Search Algorithms
      Presenting Results
      Designing the Search Interface
      Where to Learn More
9. Thesauri, Controlled Vocabularies, and Metadata
      Metadata
      Controlled Vocabularies
      Technical Lingo
      A Thesaurus in Action
      Types of Thesauri
      Thesaurus Standards
      Semantic Relationships
      Preferred Terms
      Polyhierarchy
      Faceted Classification
Part III. Process and Methodology
10. Research
      Process Overview
      A Research Framework
      Context
      Content
      Users
      Participant Definition and Recruiting
      User Research Sessions
      In Defense of Research
11. Strategy
      What Is an Information Architecture Strategy?
      Strategies Under Attack
      From Research to Strategy
      Developing the Strategy
      Work Products and Deliverables
      The Strategy Report
      The Project Plan
      Presentations
12. Design and Documentation
      Guidelines for Diagramming an Information Architecture
      Blueprints
      Wireframes
      Content Mapping and Inventory
      Content Modeling
      Controlled Vocabularies
      Design Sketches
      Web-Based Prototypes
      Architecture Style Guides
      Point-of-Production Architecture
      Administration
Part IV. Information Architecture in Practice
13. Education
      Chaos in Education
      A World of Choice
      But Do I Need a Degree?
14. Ethics
      Ethical Considerations
      Shaping the Future
15. Building an Information Architecture Team
      Destructive Acts of Creation
      Fast and Slow Layers
      Project Versus Program
      Buy or Rent
      Do We Really Need to Hire Professionals?
      The Dream Team
16. Tools and Software
      A Time of Change
      Categories in Chaos
      Questions to Ask
Part V. Information Architecture in the Organization
17. Making the Case for Information Architecture
      You Must Sell
      The Two Kinds of People in the World
      Running the Numbers
      Talking to the Reactionaries
      Other Case-Making Techniques
      The Information Architecture Value Checklist
      A Final Note
18. Business Strategy
      The Origins of Strategy
      Defining Business Strategy
      Strategic Fit
      Exposing Gaps in Business Strategy
      One Best Way
      Many Good Ways
      Understanding Our Elephant
      Competitive Advantage
      The End of the Beginning
19. Information Architecture for the Enterprise
      Economies Don't Always Scale
      "Think Different"
      The Ultimate Goal
      A Framework for Centralization
      Timing Is Everything: A Phased Rollout
      Strategy Versus Tactics: Who Does What
      A Framework for Moving Forward
Part VI. Case Studies
20. MSWeb: An Enterprise Intranet
      Challenges for the User
      Challenges for the Information Architect
      We Like Taxonomies, Whatever They Are
      Benefits to Users
      What's Next
      MSWeb's Achievement
21. evolt.org: An Online Community
      evolt.org in a Nutshell
      Architecting an Online Community
      The Participation Economy
      How Information Architecture Fits In
      Trouble Spots for Online Communities
      The "Un-Information Architecture"
Appendix: Essential Resources

Bookmark: B.Preece.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Preece, Jenny
Author: Rogers, Yvonne
Author: Sharp, Helen
Date: 2002
Pages: 544
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-49278-7, OCLC 48265540
Weblink: Publisher Information
Weblink: Companion Website (February 2002)
Contents:
Preface
	+ Perlman, Gary
1. What is interaction design?
	Interview with Gitta Saloman
2. Understanding conceptualizing interaction
	Interview with Terry Winograd
3. Understanding users
4. Designing for collaboration and communication
	Interview with Abigail Sellen
5. Understanding how interfaces affect users
6. The process of interaction design
	Interview with Gillian Crampton Smith
7. Identifying needs and establishing requirements
	Interview with Suzanne Robertson
8. Design, prototyping and construction
9. User-centred approaches to interaction design
	Interview with Karen Holtzblatt
10. Introducing evaluation
11. An evaluation framework
12. Observing users
	Interview with Sara Bly
13. Asking users and experts
	Interview with Jakob Nielsen
14. Testing and modeling users
	Interview with Ben Shneiderman
15. Doing design and evaluation in the real world: communicators and advisory systems

Bookmark: B.Symmonds.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Internationalization and Localization Using Microsoft .Net
Author: Symmonds, Nick
Date: 2002
Pages: 376
Publisher: APress
Standard number: ISBN: 1-59059002-3
Contents:
1. Localization concepts
	Multilanguage support
	What the user expects
	Resource files
2. Localization aspects
	GUI design
	Unicode
	Time & date
	Numbers
	Calendars
	Sort orders
	Help files
3. Resource files in VB6
4. System.Globalization namespace
5. System.Resources namespace
6. Resource file tools
7. Creating a resource editor in C# and VB .NET
8. Localizing your new resource editor
9. An ASP.NET example designed with localization from the start
10. Resource file versioning in .NET
11. The software development plan

Bookmark: B.Sun.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Java Look and Feel Design Guidelines
Author: Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Date: 2002
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Keywords: Style Guidelines
Note: Second Edition
Weblink: Version 2.0 February 2001

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Leonardo's laptop: human needs and the new computing technologies
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Date: 2002
Pages: 269
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-19476-7
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/main/feature/leonardoslaptop/
Contents:
1. Learning from Leonardo
2. Unusable at any bandwidth
3. The quest for universal usability
4. New methods, new goals
5. Understanding human activities and relationships
6. The New Education: E-learning
7. The New Business: E-commerce
8. The New Medicine: E-healthcare
9. The New Politics: E-government
10. The quest for mega-creativity
11. Grander goals

Bookmark: B.Wilton.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Practical JavaScript for the Usable Web
Author: Wilton, Paul
Author: Williams, Stephen
Author: Li, Sing
Date: 2002
Pages: 400
Publisher: glasshaus
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415105-1
Contents:
1: Getting Started with JavaScript
2: Data and Decisions
3: Functions and Code Design
4: Interacting with the Web Browser
5: Windows and Frames
6: DHTML for IE4 and NN4
7: The DOM: DHTML for the Latest Browsers
8: Advanced Form Techniques
9: Passing Information Between Web Pages and Data Storage
10: Data Validation Techniques

Bookmark: B.Rorres.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Practitioners handbook for user interface design and development
Author: Torres, R. J.
Date: 2002
Pages: 375
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-091296-4
Contents:
Part 1 Preliminaries
	1 Introduction
	2 User-Centered Design Through Delivery
	3 Understanding People
	4 A User-Centered Product Team
	5 Popular UI Styles
	6 Participatory Methods
	7 A Word About Tools
Part 2 Getting Started
	8 Planning a UI Design and Development Effort
	9 Requirements
	10 Users, Their Work Environment, and Tasks
	11 Conceptual Design and Architecture
	12 Principles, Guidelines, and Style Guides
	13 Mockups, Simulations, and Prototypes
	14 Usability Evaluation
	15 Iteration
Part 3 Getting Serious
	16 High Level Design
	17 Specification Techniques
	18 Low-Level Design
	19 Product Construction, Test, and Deployment
Part 4 Wrapping Up
	20 Looking Back and Beyond

Bookmark: B.farkas.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Principles of Web Design
Series Title: Allyn & Bacon Series in Technical Communication
Author: Farkas, David K.
Author: Farkas, Jean B.
Date: 2002
Pages: 377
Publisher: Longman
Standard number: ISBN: 0-205-30291-2
Weblink: Companion Website
Weblink: www.ablongman.com/catalog/academic/product/1,4096,0205302912,00.html
Contents:
1. Understanding the Web: A Designer's View
2. Planning the Project
3. Designing and Building the Project
4. Using Content Types Effectively
5. Societal Implications and Ethical Choices
6. Hypertext Theory and Node-Link Diagrams
7. Hierarchies and Organizing Content
8. The Navigational Interface
9. Designing Effective Links
10. Writing for the Web
11. Graphic Design
12. Site Maps, Search, and Indexes
13. Non-Hierarchical Information Structures
Appendixes
A. Twenty-Five Guidelines for Getting Started
B. An Introduction to Copyright Law
C. Project Reports
D. Implementation Resources
Absract: This is a university-level textbook that teaches Web design skills within a framework of information-design principles, rhetoric, and hypertext theory. The book emphasizes the importance of the underlying node-link structure in designing the navigational interface and creating content.

Bookmark: B.Dustin.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Quality Web systems: performance, security, and usability
Author: Dustin, Elfriede
Author: Rashka, Jeff
Author: McDiarmid, Douglas
Date: 2002
Pages: 318
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-71936-3
Contents:
1. Overview of Web Systems and Technologies
	Quality Web Systems
	Success Criteria
	Assigning Priorities Based on Risks
	Web System Engineering
	Web System Architecture
2. Web Engineering Using the RSI Approach
	Use Cases Analysis
	Goal Oriented Use Cases Analysis
	RSI Approach
	RSI Model Development
	Non-Functional Requirements
	Technology Selection
	Test Procedures From RSI Use Cases
	Chapter Summary
	References
3. Security
	Overview
	Web and Application Servers
	Database Server
	Client Computer
	Secure Communications
	Network Security
	Verifying Site Security
	TBS Case Study
	Chapter Summary
	References
4. Performance
	Overview
	Performance and Scalability Requirements
	Verifying Site Performance and Scalability
	Verification Phases
	Interpreting the Test Results
	Improving Performance and Scalability
	Analyzing Scalability and Cost
	TBS Case Study
	Chapter Summary
	References
5. Compatibility
	Client-Side Compatibility Issues
	Verifying Site Compatibility
	TBS Case Study
	Chapter Summary
	References
6. Usability and Accessibility
	Usability Engineering
	Accessibility
	Usability Evaluation
	Automating Usability Evaluation
	TBS Case Study
	Chapter Summary
	References
7. Tools
	Engineering
	Security
	Performance and Scalability
	Compatibility
	Usability
	Other Tools
	Chapter Summary
Appendixes
	A. Evaluation Checklists
	B. Test Tool Evaluations
	C. Technology Book Store Case Study

Bookmark: B.Badre.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Shaping Web Usability: Interaction Design in Context
Author: Badre, Albert N.
Date: 2002
Pages: 304
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-72993-8
Weblink: www.aw.com/cseng/titles/0-201-72993-8/
Contents:
1. Human Computer Interaction for the Web
	From Human Factors to Usability: A Short History of HCI
	Origins
	Focus on the User Interface
	User Interface Software
	Usability
	Focusing on the Web
	HCI Principles for the Web
	User-Centered Design
	Early Human Factors Input
	Task Environment Analysis
	Iterative Design and Continuous Testing
	Web Usability
	Themes
	Designing for Context
	Designing for the User Experience
2. Web Usability Strategy
	Scenarios
	Context
	The Userview Process
	Goals and Requirements
	User Culture
	Web Interface Guidelines Specialization
	Constructing Storyboards and Interactive Prototypes
3. The Web Environment
	The User Environment
	The Physical Space
	The Cognitive Space
	The Site Environment
	Scenarios
	Designing from Scenarios
	Simple versus Enriched Site Environments
4. The Web User, Part 1: The Audience
	Understanding the Web User
	Defining an Audience
	Individual Differences
	Cognitive Processing Capabilities and Limits
	Generating an Audience Profile
5. The Web User, Part 2: Older Adults
	Older Adults and the World Wide Web
	Characteristics of Older Users
	Movement Control
	Perception
	Cognition
	Web Design Features to Avoid
	Design Guidelines
	Usability Testing with Older Adults
6. Designing for Web Genres
	Genre Content
	Genre Expression
	Genre Form
	Genre Evolution
	Genre Mixing
7. The Web Site
	Conceptualizing the Site with a Visitor-Centered Focus
	Positioning the Content
	Speeding Up the Response
	Smoothing the Navigation
	Links
	Buttons and Controls
	Site Maps, Content Lists, and Indexes
	Landmarks and History Trails
	Keywords and Site Search Engines
	Assuring Reasonable Confidence in the Site's Privacy and Security
	Making the Site Visible
	Maintaining Quality
8. The Web Page
	General Page Design Issues
	Consistency
	Coherence
	Placement of Information
	Information Coding
	Color
	Text Clarity
	Home, Content, and Transaction Pages
	The Home Page
	The Content Page
	The Transaction Page
9. The Aesthetic Factor
	Usability and Aesthetics
	Simplicity and Enrichment
	The Use of Graphics
10. From Desktops to Handhelds
	The Technology of Wireless Devices
	The Usability of Wireless Devices
	The Role of Context
	Small-Size Effects
	Effective Functionality and Task Preferences
	Information Presentation
	Interaction and Navigation
	Designer's Palette: Guidelines for Hand Web Design
11. The Cultural Context
	Cultural Usability
	Culture-Specific Designs
	Designing for the Localized Web
	Genre-Localized Attributes
	Behaviors and Practices
	Icons, Symbols, Pictorials, and Artifacts
	Conventions and Formats
	Intangible Values and Dimensions
	Preferred Content
12. Evaluating Web Usability
	Traditional Usability Testing
	Usability Testing for the Web
	Web-Focused Issues and Testing
	Web-Specific Test Plan Issues
	Web-Specific Evaluation Issues
	The Process of Web Evaluation
	Usability Evaluation Goal Setting
	Early Paper Testing
	Storyboard Testing
	Interactive Prototype Testing
	Frequently Asked Questions about Usability Evaluation

Bookmark: B.McAlester.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Skip Intro: Flash Usability and Interface Design
Author: McAlester, Duncan
Author: Capraro, Michelangelo
Date: 2002
Pages: 272
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7357-1178-X
Contents:
1 Bad Flashers Anonymous
	2 Basic Training
Section I: Hopart Bothur Exhibit Site
	3 Overview -- A Comfortable Situation
	4 A Good Experience from the Start
	5 Scrolling Without Boundaries
	6 Less Cluttered and More Usable
	7 A Point of Flexibility
Section II: GroceryClick.com Site Design
	8 Overview -- Convenience in a Flash
	9 Tabbed Windows -- Convenient Access to Supplementary Information
	10 Needles and Haystacks -- Site Searches
Section III: Wind-Automata Developer Site
	11 Overview -- A Familiar Setting
	12 A Simple Hierarchy
	13 Tool Tips -- Know Before You Go
	14 The End...
Appendixes
	A What Every Interface Designer Should Know
	B Usability Resources
	C Flash and Design Resources

Bookmark: B.Dittrich.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Social thinking-software practice
Author: Dittrich, Yvonne
Author: Floyd, Christiane
Author: Klischewski, Ralf
Date: 2002
Pages: 481
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-26204204-5

Bookmark: B.Barnum.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability testing and research
Author: Barnum, Carol M.
Date: 2002
Pages: 428
Publisher: Longman
Standard number: ISBN: 0-20531519-4

Bookmark: B.Norlin.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability testing for library websites: a hands-on guide
Author: Norlin, Elaina
Author: Winters, C. M.
Date: 2002
Pages: 112
Publisher: American Library Association
Standard number: ISBN: 0-83893511-7

Bookmark: B.Beaumont.02f
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usable Forms for the Web
Editor: Beaumont, Andy
Editor: Stephens, Jon
Editor: James, Jon
Editor: Ullman, Chris
Date: 2002
Pages: 400
Publisher: glasshaus
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415109-4
Contents:
1: HTML Forms
2: Designing Usable Forms
3: Flash Forms
4: Using Forms with ASP
5: Using Forms with PHP and MySQL
6: Form Validation Techniques
7: Advanced Client-side Form Scripting
8: Forms in ASP.NET
Resources

Bookmark: B.Stephens.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usable Shopping Carts
Author: Stephens, Jon
Author: Kerr, Jody
Author: Evans, Clifton
Date: 2002
Pages: 200
Publisher: glasshaus
Standard number: ISBN: 1-90415114-0

Bookmark: B.Vredenburg.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-centered design: an integrated approach
Author: Vredenburg, Karel
Author: Isensee, Scott
Date: 2002
Pages: 246
Publisher: Carol Righi
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-091295-6

Bookmark: B.Clabby.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visualize this: collaboration, communication, and commerce in the 21st century
Author: Clabby, Joe
Date: 2002
Pages: 343
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-066255-0
Contents:
I The Premise
	1 Take a Virtual Journey
	2 The Opening Argument
	3 Virtual Worlds: Today's State of the Art
II Technology Roadmap
	4 The Sensor Virtual Internet Roadmap
III Human Interfaces
	5 Speech Recognition and Artificial Intelligence
	6 Navigation/Manipulation
	7 Receiving Sensory Data from Your Computer
	8 3D Graphics
	9 Sound, Scent, Touch, and Taste
IV Infrastructure
	10 Networking: Overcoming the Biggest Obstacle to Realizing the Sensory Virtual Internet
	11 Personal Computing Devices
	12 Back-End "Peer-to-Peer" Systems
	13 The Role of Data Compression
V Web Services
	14 Web Services
VI Collaboration
	15 The New Age Virtual Applications
VII Where Do We Go from Here?
	16 Summary Observations

Bookmark: B.Mander.02
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web usability for dummies
Author: Mander, Richard
Author: Smith, Bud E.
Date: 2002
Pages: 318
Publisher: Hungry Minds
Standard number: ISBN: 0-76451546-2

Bookmark: B.Borchers.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Pattern Approach to Interaction Design
Author: Borchers, Jan
Date: 2001
Pages: 268
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-49828-9
Contents:
Introduction
Design Pattern Languages
An Interdisciplinary Pattern Framework
A Pattern Language for Interactive Music Exhibits
Evaluation anf Tool Support
Summary and Further Research
Bibliography
Appendix A: Online Resources
Appendix B: WorldBeat Sample Run

Bookmark: B.Nogier.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: De l'ergonomie du logiciel au design des sites web (Software ergonomics for the design of Web sites)
Author: Nogier, Jean-Francois
Date: 2001
Pages: 250
Publisher: Dunod
Standard number: ISBN: 2-10005833-9
Note: French language book
Contents:
1: Critiques Ergonomiques
2: L'Ecran
3: Le dialogue homme-machine
4: Les erreurs et l'aide en ligne
5: Conception des sites web
6: La navigation web
7: La page web
8: Pratique de l'utilisabilie
Conclusion
Annexes
	A. L'etre humain en situation de travail
	B. Check-list de conception d'un site web

Bookmark: B.Powazek.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design for Community: The Art of Connecting Real People in Virtual Places
Author: Powazek, Derek M.
Date: 2001
Pages: 336
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7357-1075-9
Contents:
1. Is This Trip Really Necessary? ... What to Know Before You Begin
2. Content Comes First ... Give Your Community Something to Talk About
3. Design Matters ... Architectural and Visual Design for Successful Communities
4. Tools for Doing the Heavy Lifting ... How to Power Your Community
5. Policies and Policing ... Setting, Communicating, and Enforcing the Rules
6. Moderation, Karma, and Flame Bait ... How to Survive Your Own Users
7. Chat, Cams, and Virtual Intimacy ... Seeing Computers as Intimacy Devices
8. Barriers to Entry ... Making Them Work for It
9. Email Keeps the Conversation Alive ... Community That Comes to You
10. Commerce Communities ... How to Keep Money from Screwing Everything Up
11. Killing Your Community ... Nothing Gold Can Stay
12. What's Next? ... Back to the Future
Postscript. Where Do We Go from Here?

Bookmark: B.Noyes.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing for humans
Author: Noyes, Janet M.
Date: 2001
Pages: 215
Publisher: Psychology Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-41522721-6; 0-41522722-4 (pbk.)

Bookmark: B.Yang.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Face Detection and Gesture Recognition for Human-Computer Interaction
Series Title: Kluwer International Series in Video Computing: Volume 1
Author: Yang, Ming-Hsuan
Author: Ahuja, Narendra
Date: 2001
Pages: 200
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-7409-6
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-7409-6
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Detecting Faces in Still Images
3. Recognizing Hand Gestures Using Motion Trajectories
4. Skin Color Model
5. Face Detection Using Multimodal Density Models
6. Learning to Detect Faces with SNoW
7. Conclusion and Future Work
Appendices

Bookmark: B.Earnshaw.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Frontiers of human-centered computing, online communities and virtual environments
Author: Earnshaw, Rae A.
Date: 2001
Pages: 482
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85233238-7

Bookmark: B.Chen.2001
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Computer Interaction: Issues and Challenges
Author: Chen, Qiyang
Date: 2001
Pages: 265
Publisher: Idea Group Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-878289-91-8
Weblink: www.idea-group.com/Human_Computer_Interaction_Issues_and_Challenges.htm
Contents:
Designing Effective Human-Computer Interaction
Interface Design: an Embedded Process
User Interface Development Throughout the System Development Lifecycle
From HCI to Interaction Design
Intelligent Agents Supporting the Social Construction of Knowledge in a Learning Environment
A Modeling Methodology for Intelligent Agents: An Electronic Commerce Application
Courseware and its Possible Evolution Through the Use of Agent Technology
Intelligent Software Agents in Electronic Commerce: A Socio-Technical Perspective
Knowledge Engineering in Adaptive Interface and User Modeling
Application of a Cognitive Model of Collaboration to a User Interface
Structure- and Content-Based Retrieval for XML documents
MESH: A Model-Based Approach to Hypermedia Design
User Considerations in Electronic Commerce Transactions
Computer Supported Social Networking Based on Email Exchange
The Cultural Aesthetic of Virtual Reality: Simulation or Transparency?
HCI: the Next Step Towards Optimization of Computer Assisted Surgical Planning, Intervention and Training (CASPIT)

Bookmark: B.Meister.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in System Design, Development, and Testing
Series Title: Human Factors and Ergonomics
Author: Meister, David
Author: Enderwick, Thomas P.
Date: 2001
Pages: 264
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-3206-8; 9780805832068
Contents:
An Overview of System Development
The Design Process
Design Methods
Design Practice
Information Resources
Software Design
The User
A Behavioral Theory of System Design

Bookmark: B.Nicolle.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Inclusive design guidelines for HCI
Author: Nicolle, Colette
Author: Abascal, Julio
Date: 2001
Pages: 285
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-74840948-3

Bookmark: B.Khosla.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Intelligent multimedia multi-agent systems: a human-centered approach
Author: Khosla, Rajiv
Author: Sethi, Ishwar K.
Author: Damiani, Ernesto
Date: 2001
Pages: 333
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-7979-9
Note: Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science: Volume 582
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-7979-9
Contents:
Part I: Motivation, Technologies, Enabling Theories and Human Centered Virtual Machine
1. Successful Systems or Successful Technologies?
2. Technologies
3. Pragmatic Considerations and Enabling Theories
4. Human-Centered System Development Framework
5. Human-Centered Virtual Machine
Part II: HCVM Applications in Health Informatics, Face Detection, Net Euchre and Sales Recruitment
6. Intelligent Multimedia Multi-Agent Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Support System
7. A Multi-Agent System for Face Detection and Annotation
8. Modeling Human Dynamics and Breakdowns - Intelligent Agents for Internet Games and Recruitment
Part III: HCVM Applications in Internet and E-Commerce
9. Intelligent Multimedia Information Management
10. Brokerage System for Electronic Commerce Based on HCVM
11. User-Centered Approach to Content-Based Retrieval of medical Images
12. HCVM Revisited

Bookmark: B.Deitsch.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Java Internationalization
Series Title: Java Series
Author: Deitsch, Andrew
Author: Czarnecki, David
Date: 2001
Pages: 445
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-59600019-7

Bookmark: B.constantine.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Peopleware Papers, The: Notes on the Human Side of Software
Author: Constantine, Larry L.
Date: 2001
Pages: 300
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-060123-3
Contents:
I. GROUP DEVELOPMENT
	1. Decisions, Decisions
	2. Consensus and Compromise
	3. Negotiating Consensus
	4. The Lowly and Exalted Scribe
	5. Official Space
	6. Irksome Interruptions
II. COWBOYS AND COWGIRLS
	7. Cowboy Coders
	8. Cowboy Homecoming
	9. Unity in Diversity
	10. Coding Cowboys and Software Sages
III. WORK ORGANIZATION
	11. Traditional Tactics
	12. Chaos Manners
	13. Open Architects
	14. Synchronized Swimming
	15. Team Politics
	16. Having It All
	17. Contrarion Conspiracy
IV. TOOLS, MODELS AND METHODS
	18. CASE and Cognition
	19. Modeling Matters
	20. Mirror, Mirror
	21. Methodical Madness
	22. Essentially Speaking
	23. Shapes to Come
	24. Software Objectives
	25. The Seams Are Showing
V. PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS
	26. The Benefits of Visibility
	27. Rewards and Reuse
	28. Superlearning
	29. Up the Waterfall
	30. In-Time Delivery
	31. Under Pressure
	32. Re: Architecture
	33. Quality by Increments
VI. SOFTWARE USABILITY
	34. Consistency and Conventions
	35. Complexity and Creeping Featurism
	36. Going to the Source
	37. Colorful Language
	38. Improving Intermediates
	39. Unusable You
	40. Editing Interfaces
	41. In Service
VII. USABLE OBJECTS
	42. Objects in Your Face
	43. Getting the Message
	44. Abstract Objects
	45. New Media
	46. Useful Cases
	47. Efficient Objects
	48. Coherent Objects
VIII. BRAVE NEW SOFTWARE
	49. Arrogant Programming
	50. Interfaces Diversified
	51. Wizard Widgets
	52. Future Faces
IX. CULTURE AND QUALITY
	53. Culture Change
	54. Change Agents
	55. Embedded with the Best
	56. Columns from an Italian Restaurant
	57. Mentored Out
	58. In Training
	59. Gifted Programmers
	60. Industry Icons
	61. Impresario
Appendix: Registered Peopleware

Bookmark: B.Green.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Pleasure With Products: Beyond Usability
Author: Green, William S.
Author: Jordan, Patrick W.
Date: 2001
Pages: 392
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-41523704-1
Contents:
Introduction. Pleasure with Products: Beyond Usability 'Human Factors and Design'
1. Beauty in Usability: Forget Ease of Use
2. The Personalities of Products
3. Beyond Usability, Computer Playfulness
4. The Basis of Product Emotions
5. Product Appearance and Consumer Pleasure
6. Product Design for Consumer Taste
7. Pleasure versus Efficiency in User Interfaces: Towards an Involvement Framework
8. The Scenario of Sensory Encounter: Cultural Factors in Sensory-Aesthetic Experience
9. Emergence of Pleasure: Communities of Interest and New Luxury Products
10. Carrying the Pleasure of Books into the Design of the Electronic Book
11. Difficulties and Pleasure?
12. Envisioning Future Needs: from Pragmatics to Pleasure
13. Designing Experience: Whether to Measure Pleasure of Just Tune In?
14. Using Video Ethnography to Inform and Inspire User Centred Design
15. Linking Product Properties to Pleasure. The Sensorial Quality Assessment Method
16. Design Based on Kansei
17. Participative Image-based Research as a Basis for New Product Development
18. Emotional Responses to Virtual Prototypes in the Design Evaluation of a Product Design
19. Understanding Attributes that Contribute to Pleasure in Product Use
20. Measuring Experience of Interactive Characters
21. Understanding People and Pleasure-Based Human Factors
22. Mapping the User-Product-Relationship (in Product Design)
23. Cooking Up Pleasurable Products: Understanding Designers
24. Prolonging the Pleasure
25. Comfort and Pleasure
26. Collecting Stories on User Experiences to Inspire Design - A Pilot
27. Usability Perception
28. Applying Evaluation Methods to Future Digital TV Services
29. Activity and Designing Pleasurable Interaction with Everyday Artifacts
Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Alesso.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Intelligent Wireless Web
Author: Alesso, H. Peter
Author: Smith, Craig F.
Date: 2001
Pages: 416
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-73063-4
Contents:
Introduction
	The Purpose of this Book
	Who Should Read this Book
	The Organization of this Book
I. PEOPLE TO DEVICES
	1. Developing a Framework for the Intelligent Wireless Web
	2. Speech Recognition & Understanding
II. DEVICES TO DEVICES
	3. Wireless Personal Area Networks
	4. Merging Wired and Wireless Networks
	5. Merging Wireless Devices with the Web
	6. Artificial Intelligence
	7. Merging AI and the Web
III. DEVICES TO PEOPLE
	8. Speech Synthesis & Translation
	9. Technological Revolution
	10. Progress Developing the Intelligent Wireless Web
IV. APPENDIXES
	Appendix A. Standards Organizations
	Appendix B. Mobile Protocol
	Appendix C. Graphs
	Appendix D. Dynamic Languages
	Appendix E. Security
	Appendix F. Visual Prolog
	Appendix G. Knowledge Management: A Case Study of Convera Software
	Appendix H. List of Acronyms
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Hafner.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Well: a story of love, death, and real life in the seminal online community
Author: Hafner, Katie
Date: 2001
Pages: 196
Publisher: Carroll & Graf
Standard number: ISBN: 0-78670846-8

Bookmark: B.Dertouzos.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The unfinished revolution: human-centered computers and what they can do for us
Author: Dertouzos, Michael L.
Date: 2001
Pages: 224
Publisher: HarperCollins
Standard number: ISBN: 0-06662067-8
Contents:
1. Why Change
	Charting New Terrain
	Rise of the Information Marketplace
	Integrate Computers into Our Lives
	Give Us a Gas Pedal and Steering Wheel
	Reach All People
2. Let's Talk
	Elusive Intelligence
	Speech and Vision: Different Roles
	Let's Talk
	Show Me
	A New Metaphor
	Brain Chips
3. Do It for Me
	The Ascent to Meaning: E-Forms
	Meaning on the Web: Metadata
	Bring Things under Control
	Hundreds of Dumb Servants
	Start the Ball Rolling
	Automation and Society
4. Get Me What I Want
	Organize or Search?
	Discovering What Your Information Means
	The Semantic Web Conspiracy
	A New Information Model
	Call to Action
5. Help Us Work Together
	The Challenge
	Messages and Packages
	Collaboration Systems
	Information Work
	Privacy
	More Social Consequences
	Distance Education
6. Adapt to Me
	A Growing Need
	Pushing the OS Upward
	Nomadic Software
7. Applying the New Forces
	Health
	Commerce
	Disaster Control
	Medicine in the Bush
	Total Financial Services
	Play
	Sundials
	Why These Five Forces?
	Dovetailing People with the Forces
8. Oxygen
	Putting It All Together
	The Handy 21
	The Enviro 21
	The N21 Network
	Speech
	Automation
	Individualized Information Access
	Collaboration
	Customization
	The Oxygen Software System
	Turning on a Dime
9. Finishing the Unfinished Revolution
	Info Royalty
	Global Reach
	Monoculture and Overload
	The Technology Fountain
	No Machines beyond This Point
	Greater Humanity?
	Beyond the Information Revolution

Bookmark: B.Rosson.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability Engineering: Scenario-Based Development of Human Computer Interaction
Author: Rosson, Mary Beth
Author: Carroll, John M.
Date: 2001
Pages: 448
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-712-9
Contents:
1: Scenario-Based Usability Engineering
2: Analyzing Requirements
3: Activity Design
4: Information Design
5: Interaction Design
6: Prototyping
7: Usability Evaluation
8: User Documentation
9: Emerging Paradigms for User Interaction
10: Usability Engineering in Practice
Appendix: Inferential Statistics
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Brinck.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability for the Web: Designing Web Sites that Work
Series Title: Interactive Technologies
Author: Brinck, Tom
Author: Gergle, Darren
Author: Wood, Scott D.
Date: 2001
Pages: 432
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-658-0
Contents:
Introduction
Pervasive Usability
Requirements Analysis
Task Analysis
Principles of Page Layout
Envisioning Design - Mockups and Prototypes
Writing for the Web
Production
Launching the Web Site

Bookmark: B.Spolsky.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User interface design for programmers
Author: Spolsky, Joel
Date: 2001
Pages: 144
Publisher: Apress
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-89311594-1
Contents:
1. Controlling Your Environment Makes You Happy
2. Figuring Out What They Expected
3. Choices
4. Affordances and Metaphors
5. Broken Metaphors
6. Consistency and Other Hobgoblins
7. Putting the User in Charge
8. Design for Extremes
9. People Can't Read
10. People Can't Control the Mouse
11. People Can't Remember
12. The Process of Designing a Product
13. Those Pesky Usability Tests
14. Relativity: Understanding UI Time Warps
15. But...How Does It Know?
16. Tricks of the Trade
17. Designing for the Web
18. Programming for Humans

Bookmark: B.Lazar.2001
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Web Development
Author: Lazar, Jonathan
Date: 2001
Pages: 224
Publisher: Jones & Bartelett Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7637-1431-3
Weblink: catalog.jbpub.com/detail.cfm
Contents:
1: Introduction
2: User-Centered Web Development Lifecycle
3: Defining the Site Mission and the Target User Population
4: What Information Need to be Collected from Users?
5: Methods of Gathering Requirements
6: Conceptual Design of the Web Site- Site Architecture and Navigation
7: Conceptual Design and the Web Site-Page Layout
8: Conceptual Design- Designing for Multiple Browsers
9: Physical Design
10: Usability Design
11: Implementation and Marketing
12: Maintenance and Evaluation
Absract: Frequently, web sites are designed without considering the needs of the users. As a result, the web site often fails to fulfill its intended purpose. User-Centered Web Development guides readers through the process of designing web-based resources based on the needs of the user. This text will take the reader from the initial idea of developing a web site, through determining the mission of the web site, collecting the requirements, designing the pages, performing usability testing, and implementing and managing a web site. Further, large case studies will assist readers in comprehending how these user-centered design concepts can be applied to real-world settings.

Bookmark: B.Cato.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-centered web design
Author: Cato, John
Date: 2001
Pages: 320
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-39860-5
Contents:
1. Design for Use
	Awareness, Understanding, Action (AUA)
	What is Design?
	What is Useability?
	Why Design for Use?
	A Pragmatic Viewpoint
2. Discover, Design, Use
	Design Frameworks
	The Iterative Process of Design
	Overview of the Design Process
	The Mindset You Bring to Design
	When to Involve Users
3. Discovery
	Discovery Foundations
	The Organization
	The System
	The Users -- Roles
	The Use -- Actions
	The Information -- Objects
4. Designing the System
	From Discovery to Design
	Areas
	What are the Pages? -- the Action Process
	What's on a Page? -- the Information Objects
	Interaction Design -- the AUA Model
5. Visual Design
	Style
	Screen
	Areas
	What are the Pages? -- the Action Process
	What's on a Page? -- the Information Objects
	Action and Interaction
	Realization -- Making it Work
6. Use
	Useability Evaluation
	Use is Design
	Lessons from Useability Evaluation
7. Side Trips
	Creativity -- Breaking the Blocks and Thinking Anew
	Brainstorming
	Six Hats Technique
	City Image, Narrative and Interaction Design
	Designing for WAP Phones

Bookmark: B.Dourish.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction
Author: Dourish, Paul
Date: 2001
Pages: 256
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-04196-0
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/0262041960
Contents:
1 History of Interaction
2 Getting in Touch
3 Social Computing
4 "Being-in-the-World": Embodied Interaction
5 Foundations
6 Moving Toward Design
7 Conclusions and Directions
Absract: Computer science as an engineering discipline has been spectacularly successful. Yet it is also a philosophical enterprise in the way it represents the world and creates and manipulates models of reality, people, and action. In this book Paul Dourish addresses the philosophical bases of human-computer interaction. He looks at how what he calls "embodied interaction" -- an approach to interacting with software systems that emphasizes skilled, engaged practice rather than disembodied rationality -- reflects the phenomenological approaches of Martin Heidegger, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and other twentieth-century philosophers. The phenomenological tradition emphasizes the primacy of natural practice over abstract cognition in everyday activity. Dourish shows how this perspective can shed light on the foundational underpinnings of current research on embodied interaction. He looks in particular at how tangible and social approaches to interaction are related, how they can be used to analyze and understand embodied interaction, and how they could affect the design of future interactive systems.

Bookmark: B.Savourel.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: XML Internationalization and Localization
Author: Savourel, Yves
Date: 2001
Pages: 544
Publisher: Sams
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67232096-7

Bookmark: B.Esselink.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Practical Guide to Localization
Author: Esselink, Bert
Date: 2000
Pages: 490
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-58811006-0 paperback; 1-58811005-2 hardcover

Bookmark: B.Mates.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Adaptive Technology for the Internet: Making Electronic Resources Accessible to All
Author: Mates, Barbara T.
Author: Wakefield, Doug
Author: Dixon, Judith M.
Date: 2000
Pages: 192
Publisher: American Library Association
Standard number: ISBN: 0-83890752-0
Contents:
Could Helen Keller Use Your Library?
Click (W) Here(?)!---Basic Document Design
Large-Print Access to the Internet
Hearing the Internet
Touching the Internet with Braille
Adaptive Technology for Hearing Impairments
Surfing the Internet with a ``Different'' Board
Computers Reading and Speaking---``Stand-Alone'' Systems
Funding Adaptive Technology
Making It All Work---Staff Training
Announcing Improved Access
Working in the Real World APPENDIXES
A Websites Helpful for Information on Accessibility
B Selected Vendors, Manufacturers, and Consultants
C Special Libraries with Adaptive Technology Programs
Glossary
Bibliography and Reading Resources

Bookmark: B.Bardini.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Bootstrapping: Douglas Engelbart, coevolution, and the origins of personal computing
Author: Bardini, Thierry
Date: 2000
Pages: 284
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80473723-1
Contents:
Introduction: Douglas Engelbart's Crusade for the Augmentation of Human Intellect
1. Language and the Body
2. The Chord Keyset and the QWERTY Keyboard
3. The Invention of the Mouse
4. Inventing the Virtual User
5. SRI and the oN-Line System
6. The Arrival of the Real User and the Beginning of the End
7. "Of Mice and Man": ARPANET, E-mail, and est
Coda: Where Hand and Memory Can Meet Again
Appendix Personnel at Engelbart's SRI Lab

Bookmark: B.ATA.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer and Web Resources for People With Disabilities: A Guide to Exploring Today's Assistive Technology
Author: Alliance for Technology Access
Date: 2000
Pages: 384
Publisher: Hunter House
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89793301-X (spiral) 0-89793300-1 (paper)
Note: 3rd Edition
Contents:
Introduction
Part I: The Search for Solutions
	A Millennium Vision
	Real People and Their Success Stories
	Setting Your Goals
	A Review of the Technology Tools
	Current Laws and Legislation
	Exploring Your Local Resources
	Building a Circle of Support
	Developing Your Funding Strategy
	Selecting Your Equipment
	Tips on Buying Your Equipment
	As You Become More Expert
	Sharing What You Learn
	More Thoughts about the Future
Part II: The Technology Toolbox
	Using the Technology Toolbox
	Ask Yourself... Charts to Determine Your Technology Needs
	Software Features
	Product Descriptions: Alternate Input
	Product Descriptions: Processing Aids
	Product Descriptions: Alternate Output
	Specialized Products
Part III: Helpful Resources and References
	Alliance for Technology Access Resource
	Centers
	State Tech Act Programs
	Americans with Disabilities Act
	Organizations
	National Conferences
	Publications
	Internet Resources
	Technology Vendors

Bookmark: B.Weinschenk.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Effective Speech Interfaces
Author: Weinschenk, Susan
Author: Barker, Dean T.
Date: 2000
Pages: 406
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-37545-4
Contents:
INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH INTERFACES
	Basic Concepts
	Human Factors in Speech Technology
	The Nature of Sound
	The Nature of Language
SPEECH TECHNOLOGY
	Speech Technologies
	Computer Software
	Hardware
	Application of Speech Technology
LAWS AND GUIDELINES FOR SPEECH INTERFACE DESIGN
	Laws of Interface Design
	Speech Guidelines
BEST PRACTICES
	Usability Processes and Techniques
	Universal Design
Appendices

Bookmark: B.Krug.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Author: Krug, Steve
Date: 2000
Pages: 224
Publisher: Que
Publisher: Circle.com Library
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7897-2310-7
Contents:
I. GUIDING PRINCIPLES
	1. Don't Make Me Think!
	2. How We Really Use the Web
	3. Billboard Design 101
	4. Animal, Vegetable, or Mineral?
	5. Omit Needless Words
II. THINGS YOU NEED TO GET RIGHT
	6. Street Signs and Breadcrumbs
	7. The First Step in Recovery is Admitting That the Home Page is Beyond Your Control
III. MAKING SURE YOU GOT THEM RIGHT
	8. "The Farmer and the Cowman Should Be Friends"
	9. Usability Testing on 10 Cents a Day
	10. Usability Testing: The Movie
	11. On Not Throwing the Baby out With the Dishes
APPENDIXES
Recommended Reading

Bookmark: B.Cassell.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Embodied conversational agents
Author: Cassell, Justine
Date: 2000
Pages: 430
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-26203278-3

Bookmark: B.Wickens.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
Author: Wickens, Christopher D.
Author: Hollands, Justin G.
Date: 2000
Pages: 573
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32104711-7 0-32101343-3
Note: third Edition

Bookmark: B.Johnson.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: GUI Bloopers Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers
Author: Johnson, Jeff
Date: 2000
Pages: 584
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-582-7
Contents:
1: First Principles
2: GUI Component Bloopers
3: Layout and Appearance Bloopers
4: Textual Bloopers
5: Interaction Bloopers
6: Web Bloopers
7: Responsiveness Bloopers
8: Management Bloopers
9: Software Reviews
10: War Stories of a User-Interface Consultant

Bookmark: B.raskin.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Humane Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems
Author: Raskin, Jef
Date: 2000
Pages: 256
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-37937-6
Weblink: www.awl.com/product/0,2627,0201379376,00.html
Contents:
Cognetics and the Locus of Attention
Meanings, Modes, Monotony, and Myths
Quantification
Unification
Navigation and Other Aspects of Humane Interfaces
Interface Issues Outside the User Interface
Appendix A: The One-Button Mouse History
Appendix B: SwyftCard Interface Theory of Operation

Bookmark: B.Ware.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Visualization: Perception for Design
Author: Ware, Colin
Date: 2000
Pages: 384
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-511-8
Contents:
1: Foundation for a Science of Data Visualization
2: The Environment, Optics, Resolution and the Display
3: Lightness, Brightness, Contrast and Constancy
4: Color
5: Visual Attention and Information that Pops Out
6: Static and Moving Patterns
7: Visual Objects and Data Objects
8: Space Perception and 3D Data Display
9: Images and Words
10: Visually Mediated Interaction with Data

Bookmark: B.Bergman.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information appliances and beyond: interaction design for consumer products
Author: Bergman, Eric
Date: 2000
Pages: 385
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860600-9

Bookmark: B.Schmitt.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: International Programming for Microsoft Windows
Series Title: Microsoft Programming Series
Author: Schmitt, David A.
Date: 2000
Pages: 350
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-57231956-9

Bookmark: B.Kaplan.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Internationalization With Visual Basic
Series Title: Sams White Book Series
Author: Kaplan, Michael S.
Date: 2000
Pages: 650
Publisher: Sams
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67231977-2

Bookmark: B.Scherer.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Living in the State of Stuck: How Assistive Technology Impacts the Lives of People with Disabilities
Author: Scherer, Marcia J.
Date: 2000
Pages: 212
Publisher: Brookline Books
Standard number: ISBN: 1-57129079-6
Note: 3rd Edition

Bookmark: B.Carroll.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Making Use: Scenario-Based Design of Human-Computer Interactions
Author: Carroll, John M.
Date: 2000
Pages: 382
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-03279-1
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
1 The Sorcerer's Apprentice
	Example: Designing a Multimedia System
	Guiding and Coordinating Discovery
	Example: Designing a Library System
	Identifying the Real Problem
	Thriving on Design
2 What is Design?
	Clarifying the Problem
	Identifying Design Moves
	Envisioning the Solution
	Recognizing Trade-offs and Dependncies
	Integrating Diverse Knowledge and Skill
	Anticipating Impacts on Human Activity
	Design Is Hard
3 Scenario-Based Design
	What Are Scenarios?
	Challenge: Design Action Competes with Reflection
	Scenarios Evoke Reflection in Design
	Challenge: Design Situations Are Fluid
	Scenarios Are at Once Concrete and Flexible
	Challenge: External Factors Constrain Design
	Scenarios Promote Work Orientation
	Challenge: Design Moves Have Many Consequences
	Scenarios Have Many Views
	Challenge: Technical Knowledge Lags Design
	Scenarios Can Be Abstracted and Categorized
	Toward a Scenario-Based Framework for Design
4 Example: Video Information System
	Raison d'Etre
	Clarifying Design Concerns and Objectives
	Envisioning Alternative Situations
	Managing Consequences and Trade-offs
	Creating and Using Design Knowledge
	Staying Focused on People and Use
5 Example: Programming Tutorial and Tools
	Design Context
	Design Analysis
	Environment: Bittitalk Browser
	Environment: View Matcher
	Development:MiTTS
	Deployment and Evaluation
6 Usability Rationale
	Claims and Requirements for the Touchstone Scenario
	Designing and Analyzing a New Touchstone Scenario
	Identifying Appropriate Goals
	Sustained Learning
	Consequences for Work Groups
	The Place of Claims Analysis in Scenario-Based Design
7 Cumulative Design
	A View Matcher for Reuse
	Principled Emulation of a View Matcher
	Activity Modeling in the MoleHill Guru
	Genre Specialization in the MoleHill Goalposter
	Envisioning and Refining the Goalposter
	Design Patterns and Design Models
8 Evaluation and Theory Building
	Evaluation Goals and Methods
	Evaluating and Developing Design Genres
	Attributions to Multiple Theories
	Remote and Distributed Causes
	Thread-Level Claims
	Evaluation-Driven Design
9 Software Development
	Object-Oriented Software
	Responsibility-Driven Design
	Developing Object Models from Scenarios
	The Scenario Browser
	The Specification-Implementation Gap
10 Finding Scenarios and Making Claims
	Where Do Scenarios Come From?
	How to Make Claims
	Managing Scenarios and Claims
11 Getting Around the Task-Artifact Cycle
	Scenario-Based System Development
	MiTTS Again
	Requirements Development in LiNC
	Toward a Scenario-Based Methodology
12 The Scenario Dilemma
	Some Status on Scenario-Based Design
	Challenges for the Future
	No More Sorcerers
Absract: Difficult to learn and awkward to use, today's information systems often change our activities in ways that we do not need or want. The problem lies in the software development process. In this book John Carroll shows how a pervasive but underused element of design practice, the scenario, can transform information systems design. Traditional textbook approaches manage the complexity of the design process via abstraction, treating design problems as if they were composites of puzzles. Scenario-based design uses concretization. A scenario is a concrete story about use. For example: "A person turned on a computer; the screen displayed a button labeled Start; the person used the mouse to select the button." Scenarios are a vocabulary for coordinating the central tasks of system development--understanding people's needs, envisioning new activities and technologies, designing effective systems and software, and drawing general lessons from systems as they are developed and used. Instead of designing software by listing requirements, functions, and code modules, the designer focuses first on the activities that need to be supported and then allows descriptions of those activities to drive everything else. In addition to a comprehensive discussion of the principles of scenario-based design, the book includes in-depth examples of its application.

Bookmark: B.Preece.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Online Communities: Designing Usability and Supporting Sociability
Author: Preece, Jenny
Date: 2000
Pages: 464
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-80599-8
Weblink: www.ifsm.umbc.edu/onlinecommunities/
Contents:
PART ONE: GETTING ACQUAINTED
	1	Introduction
	2	Community Tours
	3	Sociability: Purpose, People and Polices
	4	Usability: Tasks, Users, Software
	5	Research Speaks to Practice: Interpersonal Communication
	6	Research Speaks to Practice: Groups
PART TWO: DEVELOPING ONLINE COMMUNITIES
	7	Community-Centered Development
	8	Selecting Software
	9	Guidelines: Sociability and Usability
	10	Assessing Needs and Evaluating Communities
	11	Development Case Studies
	12	Looking to the Future

Bookmark: B.Reiss.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Practical Information Architecture: A Hands-On Approach to Structuring Successful Websites
Author: Reiss, Eric L.
Date: 2000
Pages: 224
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-72590-8
Contents:
PART I. CONSIDERATIONS
1. Setting the Scene
	Defining Information Architecture
	We All Learned The Basics Long Ago
	Who Needs to Know?
	So Who Is the Information Architect?
	What Skills Are Needed?
	Size Doesn't Matter (Much)
	You Have Both a Product and a Customer
	About Common Sense
	Structuring a Website Can't Be Learned in a Linear Fashion
	Heard All This Before (A Note to Experienced Information Architects)
	Defining a Few Terms
2. Defining the Task
	A Brief Introduction to the Site Development Process
	Setting Your Goals
	New Direct Sales Channel
	Streamline Existing Sales Routine
	Reduce the Need for Live Sales and Service Reps
	Reduce the Need for Pre-Printed Documentation
	Create Web Presence for Lead Generation
	Build Better Customer/Investor/Press Relationships
	Rescuing the Service Sector
	Keep Your Main Goal in Focus
	Defining Your Target Audience
	Chicken or Egg: Goals or Audience?
	Goals and Audience Must Be in Harmony
	Don't Take Goals for Granted
	Your Target Audience Also Has Goals
	Researching the Organization
3. Measuring Your Success
	Measuring Time and Money
	And When You're Up and Running ...
	Customer Satisfaction Surveys
	Cannibalization of Existing Sales Channels
4. Defining the Content
	Information Chunking
	Wish Lists
	A Structure Starts to Develop
	Role Playing
	Retain Your Primary Point of View
	Reviewing Competing Websites
	Teamwork or Lonely Nights
	The Post-It Technique
	Process or Outcome
5. Providing Useful Services
	User Experience and Online Brand-Building
	The Battle for Share of Mind
	Why People Visit in the First Place
	Why People Come Back
	A Review of Basic Computer Capabilities
	A Note to Technically Minded Readers
	And for Everybody Else
	A (Very) Short History of the Computer Revolution
	Make Your Product the "Hero"
6. Ensuring Successful Online Sales
	Building Shared References
	Putting Things in Perspective (Literally)
	... and Figuratively
	The Shared Reference Test
	Establishing Trust
	A Few Common Tricks of the Trade
	The Ebay Feedback System
	Keep the Sales Process Moving
	Keep It Simple for Users
	Objections to Online Sales
	Different Prices from Market to Market
	Prices Vary from Customer to Customer
	Not All Products Are Available in All Markets
7. Deciding on the Type of Site
	Generic Types
	Functional Sites
	Topical Sites
	Generic Techniques
	Multi-Target Sites
	Associative Sites
	Generic Styles
	Newsletter Sites
	Image Sites
	Tile Sites
	Traditional Sites
	Search Sites
	Hobby Sites
	Evolution on the Web
	On a Related Note ...
II. MECHANICS
8. Putting Together the First Structure
	What You Want to Accomplish
	What Are You Going to Put on the First Page?
	Getting Started
	Menu Length: The Myth of "Seven, Plus or Minus Two"
	So What's the Proper Number of Menu Items?
	Sets of Menu Items and Completeness
	Developing Homogeneous Systems
	An Example of Main Page and Menu Considerations
	Wide and Narrow?
	Good Structures Are Invisible
	One Step at a Time
	Structuring from the Bottom Up
9. Getting It Down on Paper
	Post-Its -- Again
	Written Outlines
	Mindmapping
	Electronic Applications
	Numbering Systems
	Making Notes About Specific Content
10. Calling Things by Their Right Name
	Speak Your Audience's Language
	Be Consistent
	IA Snafus
	Eliminating Doubt
	Improving the Scent
	Cute Labels
	The Graphic Designer's (I)Con Game
	You Can't Brainstorm Labels
11. Structuring the Lower Levels
	The Pros and Cons of Shell Structures
	Ensuring You Have Editorial Content on Each Page
	Levels of Detail
	Visitors Should Be Able to Anticipate Levels of Detail
	Optimum Editorial Content Length
	One Final Note
12. Getting the Most Out of Hyperlinks
	Contextual Navigation
	Dynamic Billboards
	Getting Lost Through Hypertext
	Visitors Like Hyperlinks
	Orphaned Subsites
	Avoid Run-On Hyperlinks
	Short Links
	Orphaned Links
	Splashes and Other Eyecatchers
	Recommended Reading
13. Adding Secondary Features
	Home (Main Menu)
	Contact
	Feedback
	Site Maps
	Site Indexes
	Disclaimers
	What's New
	About This Site
	First-Time Visitors
	Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
	Quick Links
	Search
	Search Engine Options
	Typical Search Engine Problems
III. FINE-TUNING
14. Refining the First Structure
	Input from the Team
	Reviewing the Structure
	Language
	Content
	Navigation and Links
	Individual Pages
	Goals and Growth
	A Final Note
15. Building a Subsite
	Typical Subsites
	When Do You Need a Subsite?
	Accessing the Subsite
	Reusing Information
	Reusing Design and Navigation
	When to Create New Design and Navigation
	Adapting Existing Information from a CD-ROM
	Guided Tours
	Providing Real Value
16. Talking to a Specific Audience
	Building One-to-One Relationships
	Creating a Depth-Segmented Sites
	Profiled Subsites
	Asking Questions
	Adaptive Navigation
17. Moving on to the Production Phase
	The Production Phase
	Where Designers and Architects Clash: Labels
	Working With Content Providers
18. Testing the Usability
	What It's All About
	Heuristic Evaluations
	Testing With Pencil and Paper
	Testing a Simple Navigational Interface
	Testing a Structural Prototype
	Testing a Complex Navigational Interface
	Full-Blown Beta-Testing
19. Looking Forward
	The Advent of WAP
	What Is WAP
	What Can WAP Do?
	How Does WAP Work?
	Why Surf on a Five-Line Screen?
	What's the New Role of the Information Architect?
	The Death of the PC?
	The Future of Traditional Websites
	Easier Content-Management Interfaces
	Better Electronic Tools for Information Architects
	Better Window Shopping
	The Value of External Links
	More Effective Use of Metadata
	Keeping Websites Legal
	Increased Emphasis on Personalization
	A Final Thought
Appendix: Sample Editorial Content Forms
Glossary
Further Reading List
Index

Bookmark: B.Menzel.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Robo sapiens -- Evolution of a New Species
Author: Menzel, Peter
Author: D'Aluisio, Faith
Date: 2000
Pages: 240
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-13382-2
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
Introduction
	Peter Menzel
Electric dreams
Robo sapiens
Bio logical
Remote possibilities
Work mates
Serious fun
Methodology
	Faith D'Aluisio
Glossary
Absract: Around the world, scientists and engineers are participating in a high-stakes race to build the first intelligent robot. Many robots already exist--automobile factories are full of them. But the new generation of robots will be something else: smart machines that act like living creatures. When they are brought into existence, science fiction will have become fact. What will happen then? With our prosthetic limbs, titanium hips, and artificial eyes, we are already beginning to resemble our machines. Equally important, our machines are beginning to resemble us. Robots already walk, talk, and dance; they can react to our facial expressions and obey verbal commands. When they take the next step and become fully autonomous, what will they do? Will we be partners or rivals? Could we meld into a single species--Robo sapiens? In Robo sapiens, Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio present the next generation of intelligent robots and their makers. Accompanying brilliant photographs of more than one hundred robots is an account of the little-known, yet vitally important scientific competition to build an autonomous robot. Containing extensive interviews with robotics pioneers, anecdotal "field notes" with behind-the-scenes information, and easy-to-understand technical data about the machines, Robo sapiens is a field guide to our mechanical future.

Bookmark: B.Ninness.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: School and Behavioral Psychology: Applied Research in Human-Computer Interactions, Functional Assessment and Treatment
Author: Ninness, H. A. Chris
Author: McCuller, Glen
Author: Ozenne, Lisa
Date: 2000
Pages: 199
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-7975-6
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-7975-6
Contents:
1. Autonomic Learning
2. Lucy in the Sky: Learning Without Language
3. The Evolution of Language and Rule-Governed Behavior
4. An Experimental Analysis of Rule-Governed Behavior and Human-Computer Interactions
5. Computer-Interactive Functional Assessments
6. Learning to Behave Yourself

Bookmark: B.Kaasgaard.01
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software Design & Usability: Talks with Bonnie Nardi, Jakob Nielsen, David Smith, Austin Henderson & Jed Harris, Terry Winograd and Stephanie Rosenbaum
Author: Kaasgaard, Klaus
Date: 2000
Pages: 188
Publisher: Copenhagen Business School Press
Standard number: ISBN: 8-71613495-8
Contents:
Introduction: Designing for Use
The Professional Stranger - A Talk with Bonnie Nardi
The Unbearable Lightness of Web Design - A Talk with Jakob Nielsen
The Art of Programming - A Talk with David Smith
Beyond Formalisms - A Talk with Austin Henderson and Jed Harris
On Hermeneutics and Software Design - A Talk with Terry Winograd
Making Usability Research Usable - A Talk with Stephanie Rosenbaum

Bookmark: B.Newman.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Talk to your computer: speech recognition made easy
Author: Newman, Dan
Date: 2000
Pages: 191
Publisher: Waveside
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96703893-6

Bookmark: B.Rheingold.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Tools for Thought -- The History and Future of Mind-Expanding Technology
Author: Rheingold, Howard
Date: 2000
Pages: 336
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-68115-3
Contents:
1 The Computer Revolution Hasn't Happened Yet
2 The First Programmer Was a Lady
3 The First Hacker and his Imaginary Machine
4 Johnny Builds Bombs and Johnny Builds Brains
5 Ex-Prodigies and Antiaircraft Guns
6 Inside Information
7 Machines to Think With
8 Witness to History: The Mascot of Project Mac
9 The Loneliness of a Long-Distance Thinker
10 The New Old Boys from the ARPAnet
11 The Birth of the Fantasy Amplifier
12 Brenda and the Future Squad
13 Knowledge Engineers and Epistemological Entrepreneurs
14 Xanadu, Network Culture, and Beyond
Afterword
Absract: The digital revolution did not begin with the teenage millionaires of Silicon Valley, claims Howard Rheingold, but with such early intellectual giants as Charles Babbage, George Boole, and John von Neumann. In a highly engaging style, Rheingold tells the story of what he calls the patriarchs, pioneers, and infonauts of the computer, focusing in particular on such pioneers as J. C. R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Bob Taylor, and Alan Kay. Taking the reader step by step from nineteenth-century mathematics to contemporary computing, he introduces a fascinating collection of eccentrics, mavericks, geniuses, and visionaries. The book was originally published in 1985, and Rheingold's attempt to envision computing in the 1990s turns out to have been remarkably prescient. This edition contains an afterword, in which Rheingold interviews some of the pioneers discussed in the book. As an exercise in what he calls "retrospective futurism," Rheingold also looks back at how he looked forward.

Bookmark: B.Graham.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Unicode: A Primer
Author: Graham, Tony
Date: 2000
Pages: 528
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-76454625-2

Bookmark: B.Baker.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Virtual reality: experiencing illusion
Author: Baker, Christopher W.
Date: 2000
Pages: 48
Publisher: Millbrook Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-76131350-8

Bookmark: B.Paciello.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Accessibility for People With Disabilities
Author: Paciello, Michael G.
Date: 2000
Pages: 392
Publisher: CMP Books
Standard number: ISBN: 1-92962908-7

Bookmark: B.Pearrow.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Site Usability Handbook
Author: Pearrow, Mark
Date: 2000
Pages: 350
Publisher: Charles River Media
Standard number: ISBN: 1-58450026-3
Note: with CD-ROM
Contents:
Getting Started
Introduction to Usability
Human Factors
User Centered Design
Usability and the Web
Usability Toolbox
Usability Tools and Techniques
Heuristic Evaluation
Scientific Approach
Usability Testing
Putting It All Together
Creating a Usability Program
Transforming Data into Change
Web Site Usability Lifecycle

Bookmark: B.Choo.2000
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Work: Information Seeking and Knowledge Work on the World Wide Web
Series Title: Information Science & Knowledge Management: Volume 1
Author: Choo, Chun Wei
Author: Detlor, Brian
Author: Turnbull, Don
Date: 2000
Pages: 236
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-6460-0
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6460-0
Contents:
SECTION I: INFORMATION SEEKING AND KNOWLEDGE WORK
1. Information Seeking
2. The Structure and Dynamics of Organizational Knowledge
SECTION II: KNOWLEDGE WORK ON INTRANETS
3. The Intranet as Infrastructure for Knowledge Work
4. Designing Intranets to Support Knowledge Work
SECTION III: INFORMATION SEEKING ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB
5. Models of Information Seeking on the World Wide Web
6. Understanding Organizational Web Use
Coda

Bookmark: B.Dumas.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Practical Guide to Usability Testing
Author: Dumas, Joseph S.
Author: Redish, Janice C.
Date: 1999
Pages: 412
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 1-84150-020-8 (1999 revised edition)
Note: Revised edition.
Weblink: Author website
Contents:
I. CONCERNING USABILITY (1)
1 Introducing Usability (3)
2 Introducing Usability Testing (21)
3 Uncovering Usability Needs Before You Design (39)
4 Basing Designs on Expertise in Human-Computer Interaction (51)
5 Evaluating Usability Throughout Design and Development (63)
6 Establishing a Usability Program in Your Organization (83)
II. PLANNING AND PREPARING FOR A USABILITY TEST (97)
7 Planning a Usability Test (99)
8 Defining Goals and Concerns (109)
9 Deciding who Should be Participants (119)
10 Recruiting Participants (135)
11 Selecting and Organizing Tasks to Test (159)
12 Creating Task Scenarios (171)
13 Deciding How to Measure Usability (183)
14 Preparing Test Materials (203)
15 Preparing the Test Environment (221)
16 Preparing the Test Team (233)
17 Conducting a Pilot Test (263)
III. CONDUCTING AND USING THE RESULTS OF A USABILITY TEST (271)
18 Caring for the Test Participants (273)
19 Conducting the Test (287)
20 Tabulating and Analyzing Data (309)
21 Recommending Changes (331)
22 Communicating the Results (339)
23 Preparing a Highlight Tape (355)
24 Changing the Product and the Process (367)
References (375)
Appendix A: Setting Up a Usability Lab (383)
Appendix B: Relevant Organizations and Journals (397)
Author Index (407)
Subject Index (409)

Bookmark: B.Lunde.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: CJKV Information Processing
Author: Lunde, Ken
Date: 1999
Pages: 1001
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592224-7
Keywords: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, East Asian Language

Bookmark: B.Vincente.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Cognitive Work Analysis: Toward Safe, Productive, and Healthy Computer-Based Work
Author: Vicente, Kim J.
Date: 1999
Pages: 408
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-2397-2 paper 0-8058-2396-4 cloth
Contents:
I: Introduction
	What's in a Word? (Glossary)
	What's the Problem? Scope and Criteria for Success
	Why Work Analysis? An Ecological Perspective
II: Three Approaches to Work Analysis
	Normative Approaches to Work Analysis: ``The One Best Way?''
	Descriptive Approaches to Work Analysis:
	"What Workers Really Do"
	Toward a Formative Approach to Work Analysis:
	"Workers Finish the Design"
III: Cognitive Work Analysis in Action
	Case Study: Process Control
	Phase 1: Work Domain Analysis
	Phase 2: Control Task Analysis
	Phase 3: Strategies Analysis
	Phase 4: Social Organization and Cooperation Analysis
	Phase 5: Worker Competencies Analysis
	Implications for Design and Research
IV: Final Words
	Designing for Adaptation: Safety, Productivity, and Health and the Global
	Knowledge-Based Economy
	Appendix: Historical Addendum

Bookmark: B.Peters.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computerized monitoring and online privacy
Author: Peters, Thomas A.
Date: 1999
Pages: 402
Publisher: McFarland & Co.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-78640706-9

Bookmark: B.Benyon.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Conceptual Modeling for User Interface Development
Author: Benyon, David
Author: Bental, Diana
Author: Green, Thomas
Date: 1999
Pages: 200
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85233009-0

Bookmark: B.Benyon.1999
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Conceptual Modeling for User Interface Development
Series Title: Practitioner Series
Author: Benyon, David
Author: Green, Thomas
Author: Bental, Diana
Date: 1999
Number of Chapters: 12
Pages: 167
Publisher: Springer London
Standard number: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-0797-2
Standard number: ISBN: 978-1-85233-009-5 (print), 978-1-4471-0797-2 (online)
Weblink: Link to Digital Content at Springer
Contents:
Modeling in User Interface Development (1-15)
An Introduction to ERMIA (17-27)
The Components of an ERMIA Model (29-49)
Conceptual and Perceptual ERMIAs (51-62)
Searching for Information (63-79)
Dealing with Complex Relationships (81-90)
Standard Structures and Safe Paths (91-102)
Representing Different Views (103-114)
Developing ERMIAs (115-127)
Practical ERMIA Modeling (129-142)
Case Study (143-157)
Conclusions (159-167)

Bookmark: B.Fink.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Cyberseduction: reality in the age of psychotechnology
Author: Fink, Jeri
Date: 1999
Pages: 308
Publisher: Prometheus Books
Standard number: ISBN: 1-57392743-0

Bookmark: B.Head.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design Wise: A Guide to Evaluating the Interface Design of Information Resources
Author: Head, Alison J.
Date: 1999
Pages: 196
Publisher: CyberAge Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-91096531-5 (paperback) 0-91096539-0 (hardcover)
Contents:
1 Interface Design Basics
	1 Why Design Matters
	2 Secret Shame
	3 Deconstructing Evaluation
2 Interface Design Analyses
	4 CD-ROMs: Treasure Trove or Wasteland?
	5 Web Sites: Weaving Deceit?
	6 Online Commercial Databases: Power Tools Unplugged?
	7 Four Predictions

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Web Usability: The Practice of Simplicity
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Date: 1999
Pages: 432
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56205-810-X
Weblink: www.useit.com/jakob/webusability/
Contents:
Introduction: Why Web Usability?
Page Design
Content Design
Site Design
Intranet Design
Accessibility for Users with Disabilities
International Use: Serving a Global Audience
Future Predictions: The Only Web Constant Is Change
Conclusion: Simplicity in Web Design
Recommended Readings

Bookmark: B.Garlock.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Web interfaces to library services and resources
Author: Garlock, Kristen L.
Author: Piontek, Sherry
Date: 1999
Pages: 103
Publisher: American Library Association
Standard number: ISBN: 0-83890742-3
Contents:
PREFACE
1 Web Interface Design for Libraries
	What Is Web Design?
	What Do Web Users Want?
	Creating a Good User Interface in the Web Environment
2 Content
	Ideas for a Content-Rich Site
	Presenting Content
	Format
	Access
	Delivery
	User Assistance
	Presenting Services
3 The Display of Your Library Web Site
	Why Using Color Is Important
	Plan Your Color Scheme
	Monitors and Browsers
	How to Use Color in Your Pages
4 Library Web Page Layout
	Tables As Design Tools
	Frames As Design Tools
	Navigation
	HTML Editors and Validators
5 Accessible Design
	Accessible Design and Assistive Technology
	Future Developments
6 Incorporating User Feedback into
	Design
	Iterative Design
	Gathering User Feedback
	Making Use of Web Statistics
	Things to Keep in Mind
7 Looking Ahead
	New Developments
APPENDIX Online Resources
INDEX

Bookmark: B.McKay.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing User Interfaces for Microsoft Windows
Author: McKay, Everett N.
Date: 1999
Pages: 640
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7356-0586-6, OCLC
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Weblink: mspress.microsoft.com/books/2493.htm
Contents:
Part I - The Basics
	1 - Know the Standards
	2 - Read Other User Interface Design Books
	3 - Establish Consistent Terminology
	4 - Establish a Consistent User Interface Style
	5 - Pay Attention to Other Programs
Part II - Understanding Users
	6 - Beginning vs. Advanced Users
	7 - Using Applications vs. Utilities
	8 - Users Aren't Designers
	9 - Users Aren't You
Part III - Design Concepts
	10 - Good User Interfaces Are Visible
	11 - Good User Interfaces Are Invisible
	12 - Learn from The Design of Everyday Things
	13 - Learn from the Web
	14 - Prototype with Caution
	15 - Keep It Simple
Part IV - Design Details
	16 - Prefer the Standard Controls
	17 - Direct Manipulation Is Cool
	18 - Appropriate Defaults Are Cool
	19 - Configurability Is Cool
	20 - Previews Are Cool
	21 - Tooltips Are Cool
	22 - Unnecessary Dialog Boxes Are Evil
	23 - Unnecessary Message Boxes Are Pure Evil
	24 - Unnecessary Repetitive Tasks Are Evil
	25 - Speed Is a User Interface Issue
Part V - Testing and QA
	26 - Programmer Testing
	27 - User Testing
	28 - Talk to Your Other Team Members
	29 - Check Your Dialog Boxes
	30 - Check Your Error Messages
	31 - Check Your Printing
	32 - Check Your Help System and Documentation
	33 - Check Your Setup Program
	34 - Use System Colors
	35 - Handle All Video Modes
	36 - Learn How to Play QA Gefahren
	37 - Keep Looking for Improvements
Appendix

Bookmark: B.Hillis.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Digital sensations: space, identity, and embodiment in virtual reality
Author: Hillis, Ken
Date: 1999
Pages: 271
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-81663250-2 (hc) 0-81663251-0 (pb)
Contents:
Introduction: Digital Relations
1. A Critical History of Virtual Reality
2. Precursive Cultural and Material Technologies Informing Contemporary Virtual Reality
3. The Sensation of Ritual Space
4. Sight and Space
5. Space, Language, and Metaphor
6. Identity, Embodiment, and Place--VR as Postmodern Technology
Epilogue: Digital Sensations

Bookmark: B.Hollands.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
Author: Hollands, Justin
Author: Wickens, Christopher D.
Date: 1999
Pages: 573
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32-104711-7
Note: 3rd Edition
Contents:
1. Introduction to Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
2. Signal Detection, Information Theory, and Absolute Judgment
3. Attention in Perception and Display Space
4. Spatial Displays
5. Navigation and Interaction in Real and Virtual Environments
6. Language and Communications
7. Memory and Training
8. Decision Making
9. Selection of Action
10. Manual Control
11. Attention, Time-Sharing, and Workload
12. Stress and Human Error
13. Complex Systems, Process Control, and Automation

Bookmark: B.Nardi.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Ecologies: Using Technology with Heart
Author: Nardi, Bonnie A.
Author: O'Day, Vicki
Date: 1999
Pages: 246
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-14066-7
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
I   Information Ecologies: Concepts and Reflections
1. Rotwang the Inventor
2. Framing Conversations about Technology
3. A Matter of Metaphor: Technology as Tool, Text, System, Ecology
4. Information Ecologies
5. Values and Technology
6. How to Evolve Information Ecologies
II   Case Studies
7. Librarians: A Keystone Species
8. Wolf, Batgirl, and Starlight: Finding a Real Community in a Virtual World
9. Cultivating Gardeners: The Importance of Homegrown Expertise
10. Digital Photography at Lincoln High School
11. A Dysfunctional Ecology: Privacy Issues at a Teaching Hospital
12. Diversity on the Internet
13. Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Sun.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Java Look and Feel Design Guidelines
Author: Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Date: 1999
Pages: 230
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-61585-1
Keywords: Style Guidelines
Weblink: Version 1.0.2 December 1999
Weblink: Version 2.0 February 2001 (supersedes above)

Bookmark: B.Kukulska.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Language and Communication: Essential Concepts for User Interface and Documentation Design
Author: Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes
Date: 1999
Pages: 162
Standard number: ISBN: 0-19510838-8
Contents:
Part I. Introduction and Foundation
	1. Introduction
	2. Foundation Concepts
Part II. Essential Language Concepts and the User Interface
	3. Language Varieties
	4. Language Changes
	5. Language Correspondences
	6. The Effect of Context
	7. The Effect of Medium and Interaction
Part III. Languages for Special Purposes and Functions
	8. Labeling and Abbreviation
	9. Explanation and Assistance
Part IV. Summary and Recommendations
	10. Making It Work
Appendix: Language Resources and Further Readings

Bookmark: B.Ray.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience
Author: Ray, William J.
Date: 1999
Pages: 496
City: Belmont, California
Publisher: Wadsworth
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53435721-0
Note: Sixth Edition

Bookmark: B.Microsoft.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Microsoft Windows User Experience
Series Title: Microsoft Professional Series
Author: Microsoft Corp
Date: 1999
Pages: 594
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7356-0566-1
Weblink: mspress.microsoft.com/books/2466.htm
Weblink: msdn.microsoft.com/library/books/winguide/welcome.htm
Contents:
PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGNING USER INTERACTION
	1 Getting Started
	2 Design Principles and Methodology
	3 Basic Concepts
	4 The Windows Environment
	5 Input Basics
	6 General Interaction Techniques
PART 2 WINDOWS INTERFACE COMPONENTS
	7 Windows
	8 Menus, Controls, and Toolbars
	9 Secondary Windows
PART 3 DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS AND GUIDELINES
	10 Window Management
	11 Integrating with the System
	12 Working with OLE Embedded and Linked Objects
	13 User Assistance
	14 Visual Design
	15 Special Design Considerations
PART 4 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES
	APPENDIX A Mouse Interface Summary
	APPENDIX B Keyboard Interface Summary
	Glossary
	Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Paterno.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Model-Based Design and Evaluation of Interactive Applications
Series Title: Applied Computing
Author: Paterno, Fabio
Date: 1999
Pages: 208
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85233-155-0
Keywords: User Interfaces; Software Engineering; System Performance and Evaluation
Weblink: www.springer.co.uk/com_pubs/ct_mbde.htm
Weblink: giove.cnuce.cnr.it/~fabio/mbde.html
Contents:
1. Introduction: Why Model-Based Design and Evaluation of Interactive Applications?
	Basic Concepts
	Structure of the book and intended audience
	Other sources of information
2.	Model-Based Approaches: Task-Oriented Approaches
	GOMS
	The cycle of Norman
	Task Analysis methods UAN
	Petri Nets
	UML
	Exercises
3.	Task Elicitation: Scenarios
	Use Cases
	Task Analysis
	Support for task identification in informal scenarios
	Task and errors
	Exercises
4.	The ConcurTaskTrees Notation: Introduction to ConcurTaskTrees
	Task Allocation
	Temporal Relationships
	Task Types
	Additional Information Associated with Tasks
	Structuring the Task Model
	Example of ConcurTaskTrees Specification
	Tool Support
	Task Models for Co-operative Applications
	Exercises
5.	Task-Based Design: Approaches to Designing Presentations
	Criteria for Designing User Interfaces
	Criteria to Group Tasks to be Supported by the Same Presentation
	Designing User Interfaces with the Support of the Task Model
	An Example
	Tasks for Accessing Databases
	Task-Oriented Help
	Adaptability
	Adaptivity
	Concluding Remarks
	Exercises
6.	Architectural Models of Interactive Applications: Software Architectures for User Interfaces
	The Interactor Model
	Composition Operators for Interactors
	From the Task Model to the User Interface Architecture Model
	The Transformation Algorithm
	Creations of Connections among Interactors to Support the Information Flow
	Example of Application of the Transformation
	Exercises
7.	Patterns in Interactive Applications: Introduction
	Patterns
	How to Represent a Task Pattern
	An Example of Task Pattern
	Architectural Patterns
	An Example of Architectural Pattern
	Relationships between Tasks and Architectural Patterns
	Tool Support for Patterns
	Comments on Patterns
	Exercises
8.	Usability Evaluation: Criteria for User Interface Evaluation
	Introduction to Approaches to Usability Evaluation
	Examples of Methods for Usability Evaluation
	Remote Usability Evaluation
	The RemUsine Method
	Evaluation of RemUsine
	Exercises
9.	Conclusions: Summarising the Results described
	Suggestions for Open Areas of Interest
	References
	Index

Bookmark: B.Constantine.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software for Use: A Practical Guide to the Models and Methods of Usage-Centered Design
Author: Constantine, Larry L.
Author: Lockwood, Lucy A. D.
Date: 1999
Pages: 579
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: ACM Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-92478-1
Weblink: cseng.aw.com/bookdetail.qry
Contents:
I: TOWARD MORE USABLE SOFTWARE
	Chapter 1: Software for Use: Usage, Usability, and User Interfaces
		Upgrading Usability
		Approaching Usability
		Changing Contexts
	Chapter 2: Built-in Usability: A Usage-Centered Design Approach
		Interfacing with Users
		Elements of a Usage-Centered Approach
		Driving Models
		Coordinated Activity
	Chapter 3: In Principle: Rules and Principles of Usage-Centered Design
		Design as Dialogue
		Rules and Principles
		Usability Rules
		User Interface Design Principles
		Other Rules
		Details, Details, Details
II: ESSENTIAL MODELS FOR USABILITY
	Chapter 4: Users and Related Species: Understanding Users and User Roles
		Of Use and Users
		Real Users and Others
		User Role Models
		User Role Maps
		User Roles in Action
		Structured Role Models
	Chapter 5 Working Structures: Task Modeling with Essential Use Cases
		Work, Work, Work
		Task Modeling
		The Use Case Map
		Building Essential Use Case Models
		Application
	Chapter 6: Interface Architecture: Interface Contents and Navigation
		Workplaces
		Interface Contents
		The Context Navigation Map
		Application
III: CREATING THE VISUAL DESIGN
	Chapter 7: Designing the Dialogue: Layout and Communication
		From Abstraction to Expression
		Communication Channels
		Screen Real Estate
	Chapter 8: Practical Widgetry: Choosing and Designing Visual Components
		Buy or Build
		Iconic Communication
		Menus
		Selecting Selection Widgets
	Chapter 9 Innovative Interfaces: Creative Interface Engineering and Custom Components
		Creative Engineering
		The Process of Innovation
		Instructive Interfaces
		Applied Innovation
IV: COMPLETING THE DESIGN
	Chapter 10: Expressing Solutions: Implementation Modeling and Prototypes
		Fun Stuff
		Prototypes and Prototyping
		Mapping the Models
		Implementation Modeling Illustrated
	Chapter 11: Help Me If You Can: Designing Help and Helpful Messages
		Even Experts Need a Lift
		Use Cases for Help
		Access and Presentation Techniques
		Special Techniques and Modalities
		Helpful Writing
		Helpful Messages
	Chapter 12: Once a Beginner: Supporting Evolving Usage Patterns
		Beyond Beginners
		Skiing the Interface
		Progressive Usage
		Supportive Interfaces
		Designing for Progressive Usage
		Progressive Usage Applied
	Chapter 13: In Place: Fitting the Operational Context
		Unsound Context
		Operational Modeling
		Environmental Adaptation
		Binding Context
		Environment Profile
		Putting Context in Place
	Chapter 14: Same Game, Different Fields: Special Applications, Special Issues
		Theme and Variation, Again
		Web Design for Use
		Web Wisdom Applied
		Embedded Systems Applications
		Other Special Interfaces
	Chapter 15: Usage-Centered Design Applied: The TeleGuida Case
		Scaling Up
		Telephone Tag
		Gathering Requirements
		TeleGuida Users and Uses
		Toward a TeleGuida Prototype
V: ASSESSMENT AND IMPROVEMENT
	Chapter 16: Better Next Time: Improvement by Inspection and Review
		Assessing Usability
		Inspection Methods
		Collaborative Usability Inspections
		Focused Inspections
	Chapter 17: By the Numbers: Measuring Usability in Practice
		Comparison Shopping
		Measured Quality
		User Interface Design Metrics
		Essential Usability Metrics Suite
		Metrics in Practice
	Chapter 18: Test Scores: Laboratory and Field Testing of
		Usability
		History Testing
		Testing, One, Two
		Test Protocol
		Testing Tactics
		Why Test, Why Not
VI: ORGANIZING AND MANAGING THE PROCESS
	Chapter 19: Code and You're Done: Implementing Interfaces
		Objects and Interfaces
		Accelerated Development
		Visual Development of Visual Designs
	Chapter 20: Using Your Users: Users in the Development Process
		Use or Abuse of Users
		Requirements Dialogue, Requirements Dance
		Going to the Source
		Using Users
		Joint Essential Modeling
	Chapter 21: Getting Organized: Usability in the Larger Context
		Organizational Units
		Standards and Style Guides
		Competing Constituencies
		Experts and Expertise
		Cultural Fit
A: Suggested Readings
B: Eleven Ways to Make Software More Usable: General Principles of Software Usability
C: Glossary
D: Forms for Usage-Centered Design
E: Subjective Usability Scales for Software (SUSS)

Bookmark: B.Becchtti.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Speech Recognition: Theory and C++ Implementation
Author: Becchetti, Claudio
Author: Ricotti, Lucio Prina
Date: 1999
Pages: 407
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-97730-6
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Speech Database
3. Speech Signal Analysis
4. Hidden Markov Models
5. HMM Training
6. Language Model
7. Recognition
8. Evaluation and Parameter Setting
Econometric Appendix: The behaviour of Financial Time Series

Bookmark: B.Cooper.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity
Author: Cooper, Alan
Date: 1999
Pages: 300
Publisher: Sams
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67231649-8
Contents:
I COMPUTER OBLITERACY
	1 Riddles for the Information Age
	2 Cognitive Friction
II IT COSTS YOU BIG TIME
	3 Wasting Money
	4 The Dancing Bear
	5 Customer Disloyalty
III EATING SOUP WITH A FORK
	6 The Inmates Are Running the Asylum
	7 Homo Logicus
	8 An Obsolete Culture
IV INTERACTION DESIGN IS GOOD BUSINESS
	9 Designing for Pleasure
	10 Designing for Power
	11 Designing for People
V GETTING BACK INTO THE DRIVER'S SEAT
	12 Desperately Seeking Usability
	13 A Managed Process
	14 Power and Pleasure

Bookmark: B.Mayhew.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Usability Engineering Lifecycle: A Practitioner's Guide to User Interface Design
Author: Mayhew, Deborah J.
Date: 1999
Pages: 560
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-561-4
Contents:
Preface
1: Introduction
REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS
2: User Profiles
3: Contextual Task Analysis
4: Usability Goal Setting
5: Platform Capabilities and Constraints
6: General Design Principles
DESIGN/TESTING/DEVELOPMENT
Design Level 1
7: Work Reengineering
8: Conceptual Model Design
9: Conceptual Model Mockups
10: Iterative Conceptual Model Evaluation
Design Level 2
11: Screen Design Standards
12: Screen Design Standards Prototyping
13: Iterative Screen Design Standards Evaluation
14: Style Guide Development
Design Level 3
15: Detailed User Interface Design
16: Iterative Detailed User Interface Design Evaluation
INSTALLATION
17: User Feedback
ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES
18: Promoting and Implementing The Usability Engineering Lifecycle
19: Usability Project Planning
20: Cost-Justification
21: Organizational Roles and Structures

Bookmark: B.Noyes.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-centered design of systems
Author: Noyes, Janet M.
Author: Baber, Christopher
Date: 1999
Pages: 222
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 3-54076007-5

Bookmark: B.MacAulay.99
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Style Guide: Basic Design Principles for Creating Web Sites
Author: Lynch, Patrick J.
Author: Horton, Sarah
Date: 1999
Pages: 164
Publisher: Yale University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-30007675-4
Weblink: info.med.yale.edu/caim/manual/
Contents:
Process
Interface Design
Site Design
Page Design
Typography
Editorial Style
Web Graphics
Multimedia

Bookmark: B.Jordan.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Introduction to Usability
Author: Jordan, Patrick W.
Date: 1998
Pages: 120
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7484-0762-6 (paper) 0-7484-0794-4 (cloth)
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 What is Usability?
3 Principles of Usable Design
4 Designing for Usability
5 Methods for Usability Evaluation
6 Conducting a Usability Evaluation
7 Conclusions

Bookmark: B.King.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Assistive Technology: Essential Human Factors
Author: King, Thomas W.
Date: 1998
Pages: 305
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
Standard number: ISBN: 0-20527326-2
Contents:
1.  Why a Book on Human Factors in Assistive Technology?
	"Jim" -- A Case Example to Begin
	The Importance of Human Factors
	Resources in Human Factors
2.  Tools, Transparency, and Assistive Technology
	Who Are Tool Users?
	Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque Assistive Technologies
	Assistive Technology: Special Tools for Special People?
	A Brief History of Assistive Technology
	Component Areas of Assistive Technology
	Who Are the Primary Users of Assistive Technology?
	The Professionals and Others Who Work with Assistive Technology
	Who Uses Assistive Technology? Case Examples
3.  What Are Human Factors?
	Background
	Human Factors in Assistive Technology
	Human Factors in Daily Life
	A Quick Human Factors Quiz -- Some Practical Realities
	Essential Areas of Human Factors in AT: Details and Case Examples
	A Framework for Understanding Human Factors in AT: Baker's Basic Ergonomic Equation
4.  Human Factors and Assistive Technology Goals
	Human Factors and Intents of Assistive Technology
	Details and Applications of Baker's Basic Ergonomic Equation
5.  Essential Human Factors in Assistive Technology
	Specific Human Factors is AT
6.  Switches and Controls: The Pass Keys to Assistive Technology
	Switches and Controls: Definitions and Examples
	Specific Human Factors Regarding Switches and Controls
	A Brief International Perspective on Switches and Controls
	Assistive Technology and Fitts' Law
7.  CRT, LCD, and LED Screens: The Gateways to Assistive Technology
	How Screens Work -- A Brief Overview
	Screens in Everyday Life
	Essential Human Factors Related to Screens
8.	AT Levels, Technological Literacy, and Life Span Issues
	Levels of Assistive Technology
	Toward Technological Literacy
	Components of AT Diagnosis and Intervention
	Technology Issues Across the Life Span
9.	Why AT Fails: A Human Factors Perspective
	Factors Related to the People Who Surround the AT User
	Factors Related to the AT User
	Factors Related to the AT Device Itself
Appendix: Resources for More Information on Human Factors and Assistive Technology
Glossary
References

Bookmark: B.Beyer.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Contextual Design: Defining Customer-Centered Systems
Author: Beyer, Hugh
Author: Holtzblatt, Karen
Date: 1998
Pages: 472
City: San Francisco
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-411-1, OCLC
Standard number: QA76.9.S88B493
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 Gathering Customer Data
3 Principles of Contextual Inquiry
4 Contextual Inquiry in Practice
5 A Language of Work
6 Work Models
7 The Interpretation Session
8 Consolidation
9 Creating One View of the Customer
10 Communicating to the Organization
11 Work Redesign
12 Using Data to Drive Design
13 Design from Data
14 System Design
15 The User Environment Design
16 Project Planning and Strategy
17 Prototyping as a Design Tool
18 From Structure to User Interface
19 Iterating with a Prototype

Bookmark: B.Bernsen.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Interactive Speech Systems: From First Ideas to User Testing
Author: Bernsen, Niels Ole
Author: Dybkjr, Hans
Author: Dybkjaer, Laila
Date: 1998
Pages: 200
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 3-540-76048-2
Contents:
1. Interactive Speech Systems
	1.1 Introduction
	1.2 Background and Scope of This Book
	1.3 State of the Art
	1.4 Unsolved Problems
2. Speech Interaction Theory
	2.1 Introduction
	2.2 Elements of Interactive Speech Theory
	2.3 Context
	2.4 Interaction Control
	2.5 Language
	2.6 Speech
	2.7 Performance
	2.8 Characterizing Systems
3. Developing Interactive Speech Systems
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 The Development and Evaluation Process
	3.3 Supporting Completeness and Consistency of Requirement Specifications
	3.4 Representing Design Space and Design Reasoning
	3.5 Speech Functionality
4. Interaction Model Analysis and Design
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 Guidelines for Co-operative Interaction Design
	4.3 Guidelines Illustrated and Explained
	4.4 Development and Justification of the Guidelines
5. Wizard of Oz Simulation
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 Wizard of Oz for Interaction Model Development
	5.3 Planning Wizard of Oz Simulations
	5.4 Developing the First Interaction Model
	5.5 Iterating the Interaction Model
	5.6 Uses of WOZ
6. Implementational Issues
	6.1 The Overall Dialogue System
	6.2 Dialogue Control
	6.3 Debugging
7. Corpus Handling
	7.1 Introduction
	7.2 Transcription
	7.3 Mark-up
	7.4 Coding
	7.5 Corpus Tools
8. Evaluation
	8.1 Introduction
	8.2 Performance Evaluation
	8.3 Diagnostic Evaluation
	8.4 A By-product: User Errors
	8.5 Adequacy Evaluation
9. Next Steps in Interactive Speech Systems
	9.1 Introduction
	9.2 Advanced Mixed Initiative Interactive Speech Systems
	9.3 Intelligent Multimodal Systems Using Advanced Interactive Speech

Bookmark: B.Olsen.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing User Interfaces
Author: Olsen, Dan R., Jr.
Date: 1998
Pages: 414
City: Mountain View, California
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-418-9, OCLC
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 Designing the Functional Model
3 Basic Computer Graphics
4 Basics of Event Handling
5 Basic Interaction
6 Widget Tool Kits
7 Interfaces from Widgets
8 Input Syntax
9 Geometry of Shapes
10 Geometric Transformations
11 Interacting with Geometry
12 Drawing Architectures
13 Cut, Copy, Paste
14 Monitoring the Interface: Undo, Groupware, and Macros

Bookmark: B.Musciano.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: HTML: The Definitive Guide
Author: Musciano, Chuck
Author: Kennedy, Bill
Date: 1998
Pages: 500
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-492-4
Note: 3rd Edition

Bookmark: B.MorrisAnne.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human aspects of library automation
Author: Morris, Anne
Author: Dyer, Hilary
Date: 1998
Pages: 400
Publisher: Gower
Standard number: ISBN: 0056607504-0
Note: 2nd ed.
Contents:
PART I HUMAN CHARACTERISTICS
	1 Human Characteristics
PART II HEALTH AND SAFETY CHARACTERISTICS
	2 The Importance of Health and Safety
	3 Musculoskeletal and Postural Problems
	4 Work-related Upper Limb Disorders
	5 Eye and Vision Problems
	6 Stress
	7 Reproductive Hazards
	8 Other Alleged Health Hazards
PART III WORKPLACE DESIGN: WORKSTATION CONSIDERATIONS
	9 Basic Considerations
	10 Workstation Components
PART IV WORKPLACE DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS
	11 Lighting
	12 Noise
	13 Heating and Ventilation
PART V WORKPLACE DESIGN: WORKSTATION DESIGN
	14 Workstation Layout and Design
	15 Workstation Layouts for Library Functions
PART VI THE HUMAN -- COMPUTER INTERFACE
	16 The Software Interface
	17 User Needs
	18 Dialogue Design
	19 Screen Design
	20 Interaction
	21 Software Evaluation
PART VII JOB DESIGN
	22 Job Design
PART VIII PLANNING AUTOMATED SYSTEMS
	23 Technological Change
	24 Training
References
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Dix.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Dix, Alan J.
Author: Finlay, Janet E.
Author: Abowd, Gregory D.
Author: Beale, Russell
Date: 1998
Pages: 650
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-239864-8
Note: 2nd Edition
Weblink: www.hcibook.com/
Contents:
Preface to the second edition
Preface to the first edition
Introduction
I. FOUNDATIONS
1. The human
2. The computer
3. The interaction
II. DESIGN PRACTICE
4. Usability paradigms and principles
5. The design process
6. Models of the user in design
7. Task analysis
8. Dialog notations and design
9. Models of the system
10. Implementation support
11. Evaluation techniques
12. Help and documentation
III. APPLICATION AREAS
13. Groupware
14. CSCW and social issues
15. Out of the glass box
16. Hypertext, multimedia and the World Wide Web

Bookmark: B.Rosenfeld.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web
Author: Rosenfeld, Louis
Author: Morville, Peter
Date: 1998
Pages: 202
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-282-4
Weblink: Argus Center for Information Architecture
Contents:
1. What Makes a Web Site Work
2. Introduction to Information Architecture
3. Organizing Information
4. Designing Navigation Systems
5. Labeling Systems
6. Searching Systems
7. Research
8. Conceptual Design
9. Production and Operations
10. Information Architecture in Action
Selected Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Grossman.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Retrieval: Algorithms and Heuristics
Author: Grossman, David A.
Author: Frieder, Ophir
Date: 1998
Pages: 272
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-8271-4
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Retrieval Strategies
3. Retrieval Utilities
4. Efficiency Issues pertaining to Sequential IR Systems
5. Integrating Structured Data and Text
6. Parallel Information Retrieval Systems
7. Distributed Information Retrieval
8. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC)
9. Future Directions

Bookmark: B.Flanagan.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide
Author: Flanagan, David
Author: Shafer, Dan
Date: 1998
Pages: 776
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-392-8
Contents:
Preface
1. Introduction to JavaScript
I. CORE JAVASCRIPT
2. Lexical Structure
3. Data Types and Values
4. Variables
5. Expressions and Operators
6. Statements
7. Functions
8. Objects
9. Arrays
10. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
11. Further Topics in JavaScript
II. CLIENT-SIDE JAVASCRIPT
12. JavaScript in Web Browsers
13. Windows and Frames
14. The Document Object Model
15. Events and Event Handling
16. Forms and Form Elements
17. Dynamic HTML
18. Saving State with Cookies
19. Compatibility Techniques
20. LiveConnect: JavaScript and Java
21. JavaScript Security
III. REFERENCE

Bookmark: B.Thomas.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Long Term Human-Computer Interaction: An Exploratory Perspective
Author: Thomas, Richard C.
Date: 1998
Pages: 216
City: London
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 3-540-76209-4
Contents:
Preface
Foreword by Alan Dix
1 Setting The Scene
1.1 Evidence for Continuous Change
1.2 A Changing Focus in HCI
1.3 Framework for Long Term Interaction
1.4 The Costs of Longitudinal Studies
1.5 The Sydney Study
1.6 Outline of the Book
2 The Long Haul From Novice to Expert
2.1 Skill Acquisition
2.2 The Problems of Novices
2.3 Experienced Performance
2.4 Longitudinal Studies
2.5 Conclusion
3 Data Collection
3.1 Approaches to Longitudinal Data Collection in HCI
3.2 The White Rat of HCI
3.3 Monitoring at Sydney
3.4 Cohorts
3.5 Drop Out Rates
3.6 Summary
4 Learning and Transfer
4.1 The First Lab
4.2 Task Descriptions
4.3 Initial Learning in 1991
4.4 Initial Learning in 1992 and 1993
4.5 Typing Speeds
4.6 Performance Improvements in Editing
4.7 Conclusions
5 A Fresh Look at Vocabulary
5.1 Previous Work
5.2 Frequencies in the Sydney Study
5.3 The Type Token Ratio
5.4 Trends in TTR
5.5 Transitions in the TTR
5.6 Other Behaviours
5.7 Discussion
5.8 Conclusions
6 Exploration
6.1 Previous Field Studies of Exploration
6.2 Operational Definition of Exploration
6.3 Early Exploration
6.4 Continuous Exploration
6.5 Serendipity
6.6 The Importance of Chance
6.7 Conclusions
7 Crossovers
7.1 A Classification of Temporal Effects
7.3 File Write Methods
7.4 Visualisation Technique
7.5 File Write Crossover Results
7.6 Discussion
7.7 The Zone of Exploration Model
7.8 Conclusion
8 Conclusions
8.1 Methodologies
8.2 Process Dynamics
8.3 Implications for Design
8.4 Training, Education and Job Design
References
A. Command Codes and Ranks
B. A Model of the Command Distribution

Bookmark: B.henderson.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: On Line and on Paper: Visual Representations, Visual Culture, and Computer Graphics in Design Engineering
Series Title: Inside Technology Series
Author: Henderson, Kathryn
Date: 1998
Pages: 256
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-08269-1
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Casey.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Set Phasers on Stun: And Other True Tales of Design, Technology, and Human Error
Author: Casey, Steven
Date: 1998
Pages: 251
Publisher: Aegean Pub Co.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96361788-5

Bookmark: B.Losee.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Text Retrieval and Filtering: Analytic Models of Performance
Series Title: Kluwer International Series on Information Retrieval
Author: Losee, Robert M.
Date: 1998
Pages: 356
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-8177-7
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Quantitative Reasoning
3. Similarity and Retrieval Decisions
4. Measuring Performance
5. The Quality of A Ranking Method
6. Performance with One Term
7. Multivariate Probabilities
8. Performance with Multiple Terms
9. Logics and Rules
10. Linguistic Knowledge

Bookmark: B.Faulkner.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Essence of Human-Computer Interaction
Series Title: Essence of Computing Series
Series Title: Computer Books
Author: Faulkner, Christine
Date: 1998
Pages: 240
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-751975-3
Contents:
Preface
1 An overview of human-computer interaction
1.1 The background to HCI
1.2 The relationship of HCI to other disciplines
1.3 The importance of HCI
1.4 The role of HCI in the development of software
1.5 Summary
1.6 Exercises
1.7 References
1.8 Further reading
1.9 Electronic resources
2 The user's physical capabilities
2.1 Cognition
2.2 The senses
2.3 Vision
2.4 Design considerations
2.5 Hearing
2.6 Touch -- the haptic channel
2.7 Taste and smell
2.8 Summary
2.9 Self test list
2.10 Exercises
2.11 References
2.12 Further reading
2.13 Electronic resources
3 The user's mental capabilities
3.1 Background
3.2 An overview of memory
3.3 Memory in action
3.4 Memory experiments
3.5 Guidelines for interfaces
3.6 Memory and learning
3.7 Computer-human systems?
3.8 Summary
3.9 Self test list
3.10 Exercises
3.11 References
3.12 Further reading
4 The interface
4.1 Background
4.2 The principles of interface design
4.3 The classification of interaction styles
4.4 Direct versus linguistic manipulation
4.5 Some design considerations
4.6 Summary
4.7 Self test list
4.8 Exercises
4.9 References
4.10 Further reading
5 Designing systems for people
5.1 Background
5.2 User classification
5.3 User types
5.4 The design process
5.5 Collection of data about the system
5.6 The purpose of task analysis
5.7 Strategies for representing design
5.8 Conclusions
5.9 Summary
5.10 Self test list
5.11 Exercises
5.12 References
5.13 Further reading
6 Evaluation and testing
6.1 The importance of evaluation
6.2 Problem areas in evaluation
6.3 When and what to evaluate
6.4 Evaluation techniques
6.5 Experiments
6.6 Questionnaires
6.7 Recommendations for questionnaire design
6.8 Questionnaire types
6.9 Interviews
6.10 Observation
6.11 Activity sampling and activity logging
6.12 Co-operative evaluation
6.13 Summary
6.14 Self test list
6.15 Exercises
6.16 References
6.17 Further reading
7 Making systems that people can use
7.1 Usability engineering
7.2 Defining objectives in usability engineering
7.3 Usability engineering as a process
7.4 Extensions to the usability specification
7.5 Checklist for developing a usability specification
7.6 Usability metrics
7.7 Socio-technical design
7.8 Problems caused by the introduction of computers
7.9 Managing computerization using socio-technical design
7.10 Dialogue design guidelines
7.11 General principles for system design
7.12 Summary
7.13 Self test list
7.14 Exercises
7.15 References
7.16 Further reading
8 Ergonomics, health and safety
8.1 Health and safety
8.2 Postural fatigue and repetitive strain injury
8.3 Ergonomics
8.4 The office environment
8.5 Summary
8.6 Self test list
8.7 Exercises
8.8 References
8.9 Further reading
8.10 Electronic resources
9 Social implications and the future of HCI
9.1 The workplace
9.2 The home
9.3 Society
9.4 Hypertext and the Web
9.5 Computer systems and the law
9.6 Summary
9.7 Self test list
9.8 Exercises
9.9 References
9.10 Further reading
9.11 Electronic resources
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Norman.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Invisible Computer: Why Good Products Can Fail, the Personal Computer Is So Complex and Information Appliances Are the Solution
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 1998
Pages: 340
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-14065-9
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/the-invisible-computer.html
Contents:
1   Drop Everything You're Doing
2   Growing Up: Moving from Technology-Centered to Human-Centered Products
3   The Move to Information Appliances
4   What's Wrong with the PC?
5   There Is No Magical Cure
6   The Power of Infrastructure
7   Being Analog
8   Why Is Everything So Difficult to Use?
9   Human-Centered Development
10   Want Human-Centered Development? Reorganize the Company
11   Disruptive Technologies
12   A World of Information Appliances
Appendix   Examples of Information Appliances

Bookmark: B.Sinclair.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Typography on the Web
Author: Sinclair, Joseph T.
Date: 1998
Pages: 350
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12645-545-7
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
Introduction
Part I: Fundamentals of Typography: Readability: The Historical Objective
It's All in the Face
Principles of Typography
The Santa Clara System
Part II: Digital Typography: How Typography Works on a Computer
Part III: Typesetting for the Web: Typesetting with HTML
Special HTML Techniques
Web Text Layout Techniques
Part IV: Cascading Style Sheets: Introduction to Cascading Style Sheets
Using Cascading Style Sheets
Part V: Bitstream TrueDoc: Introduction to TrueDoc
Using TrueDoc in Web Pages
Web Authoring Software Featuring TrueDoc
Hedging Your Bets
Part VI: Advanced Techniques for Web Typography: Advanced HTML Techniques
Using Typesetting with Dynamic HTML
Using Special Techniques for Large Volume Publishing
Typography for Net-TV
What's Your Type?
Appendix
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Hackos.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User and Task Analysis for Interface Design
Author: Hackos, JoAnn T.
Author: Redish, Janice C.
Date: 1998
Pages: 488
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-17831-4
Contents:
Preface
1. Introducing User and Task
	Analysis for Interface Design
	What is this book about?
	What is interface design?
	What makes an interface usable?
	What is user and task analysis?
	When should you do user and task analysis?
	Why do user and task analysis at all?
	Why isn't this done all the time already?
	Where does user and task analysis come from?
PART 1. UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEXT OF USER AND TASK ANALYSIS
2. Thinking About Users
	Why study users?
	Who are your users?
	Starting a user and task analysis
	What do you want to know about your users?
	Jobs, tasks, tools, and mental models: How users define themselves
	Individual differences
	What are the trade-offs?
3. Thinking About Tasks
	What is task analysis?
	Starting with users' goals
	Identifying different types and levels of task analysis
	Combining workflow analysis and job analysis
	Task analysis to develop a task list or task inventory
	Process analysis, task sequences
	Task hierarchies
	Procedural analysis
	Thinking of users according to their stages of use
4. Thinking About the Users' Environment
	Why is environment important?
	What aspects of the environment are important?
	What should you look for in the physical environment?
	What should you look for in the social and cultural environment?
	What are the trade-offs?
5. Making the Business Case for Site Visits
	Challenging or verifying your assumptions
	Countering objections to doing user and task analysis
	Preparing a business proposal
PART 2. GETTING READY FOR SITE VISITS
6. Selecting Techniques
	Observing, listening to, and talking with users
	Interviewing users and others
	Working with users away from their work sites
	Using more traditional market research techniques
	Using more traditional systems development techniques
7. Setting Up Site Visits
	Issues and objectives
	Participants
	Locations
	Schedule
	Recruiting
	Data collection techniques
8. Preparing for the Site Visits
	Issues to consider as you prepare
	Organizing the team
	Training the team
	Materials for the site visits
	What materials will you need for the team to use during the site visits?
	What materials will you need to facilitate information gathering?
	Will you videotape? Audiotape?
	Deciding what you will do with the data
	Staying organized (building in record keeping)
	Site Visit Plan
	Site visit plan for SuperSales
PART 3. CONDUCTING THE SITE VISIT
9. Conducting the Site Visit-Honing Your Observation Skills
	Handling the site visit
	Learning more about the user
	Taking notes on the user's environment
	Understanding the users' goals
	Understanding the users' tasks
	Asking the user to talk to you and to think aloud
	Noting where the user starts the task
	Noting what triggers the task
	Taking down the level of detail you need for your issues
	Capturing interactions with other resources: people, paper, programs
	Separating observations and inferences as you watch users
	Noting where the user ends the task (what happens next)
	Noting whether the user successfully met the goal
	Going on to the next observation or the next part of the site visit
	Thanking the user, distributing presents, and taking your leave
10. Conducting the Site Visit-Honing
	Your Interviewing Skills
	Listening-the most important part of interviewing
	Setting expectations about roles and knowledge
	Planning the questions or issues for site visit interviews
	Knowing what you are trying to learn
	Realizing the power of different types of questions
	Asking neutral questions
	Respecting silence
	Watching body language and other signals from users
	Capturing exactly what the user says
	Staying close to your site visit plan
	Being flexible
	Giving users opportunities to answer the questions you didn't ask
	Handling questions from users
PART 4. MAKING THE TRANSITION FROM ANALYSIS TO DESIGN
11. Analyzing and Presenting the
	Data You Have Collected
	Methods for organizing and analyzing your data
	Other methods for analyzing your data
	Methods of enhancing your presentations
	Selecting the best methods for your analysis
	Selecting the right methods for analysis depends on team issues
12. Working toward the Interface Design
	Designing from what you've learned
	Qualitative usability goals and measurable objectives
	Objects/Actions: Nouns/Verbs
	Metaphors for the interface design
	Use scenarios
	Use sequences
	Use flow diagrams
	Use workflows
	Use hierarchies
	Storyboarding and sketching
	Video dramatizations
13. Prototyping the Interface Design
	Setting the background
	Building prototypes
	Evaluating prototypes
	Continuing the process
14. User and Task Analysis for
	Documentation and Training
	What types of documents and training materials need user and task analysis?
	What counts as documentation or training in a software application?
	Why are there so many types of communication in software?
	Who should prepare documentation and training materials?
	Why should you do user and task analysis for documentation and training?
	What might you do during site visits if your focus is documentation or training?
	What can you do with the information you gather during site visits?
	How do you move from decisions to prototypes?
	User's manuals: Why is organizing by users' tasks so important?
	Getting started manuals: What is minimalism?
	Online help: What do people want to know?
	On the screen: What is an embedded performance support system?
	What about the Web?
	What about computer-based and Web-based training?
Appendix A. Template for a Site Visit Plan
	Issues and objectives
	Participants
	Locations
	Schedule for the field study project
	Recruiting
	Data collection techniques and schedule for each site visit
	Teams
	Materials
	Media
	Data analysis and reporting
Appendix B. Resources
Appendix C. Guidelines for User-Interface Design

Bookmark: B.Wood.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User interface design: bridging the gap from user requirements to design
Author: Wood, Larry E.
Date: 1998
Pages: 312
Publisher: CRC Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-84933125-0

Bookmark: B.Henry.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Information Design for Improved Software Usability
Series Title: Artech House Computer Science Library
Author: Henry, Pradeep
Date: 1998
Pages: 254
Publisher: Artech House
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89006-946-8
Contents:
1. Information: Its Role in Software Usability
2. What is UCID?
3. The UCID Process
4. Managing UCID
5. Analyzing Users and Tasks
6. Goal Setting for Software Usability and Information Quality
7. Designing the Information Architecture
8. Designing the Specifications and Prototypes
9. Designing Labels
10. Designing Messages
11. Designing Online Support Elements
12. Designing Printed Support Elements
13. Achieving Information Design Goals
14. Evaluating Information: Two-Level Approach
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Fleming.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Navigation: Designing the User Experience
Author: Fleming, Jennifer
Date: 1998
Pages: 253
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-351-0
Note: includes CD-Rom
Contents:
1. Getting Started
2. Ten Qualities of Successful Navigation
3. Designing for Users
4. Site Architecture
5. Interface and Interaction Design
6. Looking at Process
7. Navigation Design for Shopping Sites
8. Navigation Design for Community Sites
9. Navigation Design for Entertainment Sites
10. Navigation Design for Identity Sites
11. Navigation Design for Learning Sites
12. Navigation Design for Information Sites
A Technical Tips
B Glossary
C Netography
D Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Morris.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Page Design: A Different Multimedia
Author: Morris, Mary E. S.
Author: Hinrichs, Randy J.
Date: 1998
Pages: 306
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-239880-X
Contents:
1. Web - A Different Multimedia
2. Content Design
3. Cognitive Design
4. Audience Considerations
5. Navigational Design
6. Layout
7. Designing Graphical Elements
8. Adding Meta-Information
9. Interactivity Design
10. Designing for Time
11. Experiential Design
12. Testing the Design
13. Sun and Java, Case Study No. 1
14. Point Communications, Case Study No. 2
15. GolfWeb, Case Study No. 3

Bookmark: B.Spool.98
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Site Usability: A Designer's Guide
Author: Spool, Jared M.
Author: Scanlon, Tara
Author: Schroeder, Will
Author: Snyder, Carolyn
Author: DeAngelo, Terri
Date: 1998
Pages: 156
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-569-X
Contents:
Part 1: Research Results
1. Web Site Usability: The Big Picture
2. Getting Around: Navigation
3. Getting Around: Links
4. Within-Site Searching
5. The Difficulty of Comparisons
6. Readability and Page Layout
7. Graphic Design on the Web
8. User Preference
Part 2: Site Scrapbook
9. Edmund's
10. Hewlett Packard
11. WebSaver
12. Travelocity
13. Inc
14. C|net
15. Fidelity
16. Disney
Part 3: Testing Sites
17. How We Tested Web Sites

Bookmark: B.Picard.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Affective Computing
Author: Picard, Rosalind W.
Date: 1997
Pages: 275
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-16170-2
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
Introduction
I ENVISIONING AFFECTIVE COMPUTING
1 Emotions Are Physical and Cognitive
2 Affective Computers
3 Applications of Affective Computing
4 Potential Concerns
II BUILDING AFFECTIVE COMPUTING
5 Affective Signals and Systems
6 Recognizing and Expressing Affect
7 Emotion Synthesis
8 Affective Wearables
Summary

Bookmark: B.Wickens.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Introduction to Human Factors Engineering
Author: Wickens, Christopher D.
Author: Gordon, Sallie E.
Author: Liu, Yili
Date: 1997
Pages: 750
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-32-101229-1
Contents:
1 Introduction to Human Factors
2 Research Methods
3 Design and Evaluation Methods
4 Visual Sensory Systems
5 Auditory, Tactile, and Vestibular System
6 Cognition
7 Decision Making
8 Displays
9 Control
10 Engineering Anthropometry and Work-Space Design
11 Biomechanics of Work
12 Work Physiology
13 Stress and Workload
14 Safety, Accidents, and Human Error
15 Human-Computer Interaction
16 Automation
17 Transportation Human Factors
18 Selection and Training
19 Social Factors

Bookmark: B.Raman.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Auditory User Interfaces: Toward the Speaking Computer
Author: Raman, T. V.
Date: 1997
Pages: 168
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-9984-6
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-9984-6
Contents:
Preface
Acknowledgements
1. SPEECH-ENABLED APPLICATIONS
1.1 Introduction
1.2 What Is UI?
1.3 Alternative Modes of Interaction
1.4 Retrofitting Spoken Interaction
1.5 The Speech-enabling Approach
1.6 Separating Computation From User Interface
2. NUTS AND BOLTS OF AUDITORY INTERFACES
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Speech Synthesis
2.3 Speech Recognition
2.4 Digital Signal Processing Techniques
2.5 Auditory Displays And Audio Formatting
2.6 Interactive User Interface Development
3. THE AUDIO DESKTOP
3.1 Introduction
3.2 The Visual Desktop
3.3 Conversational Gestures
3.4 Choosing Abstractions For The Audio Desktop
4. CONCRETE IMPLEMENTATION OF AN AUDIO DESKTOP
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Basic Services For Speech-enabling The Desktop
4.3 The Emacspeak Desktop
4.4 Speech-enabled Editing Tools
4.5 Structured Editing And Templates
4.6 Browsing Structured Information
4.7 Information Management On The Audio Desktop
4.8 Speech-enabled Messaging Tools
4.9 Editing Program Source
4.10 Software Development Environment
4.11 Technique Used To Speech-enable Emacs
4.12 Thanking The Emacs Community
5. SPEECH-ENABLING THE WWW
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Aural Information Access
5.3 Web Surfing Without A Monitor

Bookmark: B.Damer.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Avatars!: Exploring and Building Virtual Worlds on the Internet
Author: Damer, Bruce
Date: 1997
Pages: 522
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-68840-9

Bookmark: B.Baber.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Beyond the Desktop: Designing and Using Interaction Devices
Series Title: Computers and People
Author: Baber, Christopher
Date: 1997
Pages: 384
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12069550-2
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Keyboards
3. Pointing devices
4. Alternative interaction devices
5. Classifying devices
6. Modeling device use
7. Typing
8. Writing and drawing
9. Pointing
10. Speaking
11. Devices for restricted environments
12. Physical aspects of interaction device use
13. Interaction devices at work
14. Multimodal human-computer interaction

Bookmark: B.Cohill.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Community Networks: Lessons from Blacksburg, Virginia
Author: Cohill, Andrew
Author: Kavanaugh, Andrea
Date: 1997
Date: 1997
Pages: 346
Publisher: Artech House
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89006-896-8
Contents:
1. Welcome to Blacksburg:
	Just Hook People Up
	The BEV is Intensely Personal
	We Write More than Ever in Blacksburg
	Storytelling
	Sense and Sensibility
	Education
	Blacksburg and the Net
	About the Book
2. A Brief History of the Blacksburg Electronic Village:
	Getting Started
	Unique Features of the BEV
	Growth of the BEV
	The Future of the BEV
3. The Architecture of a Community Network:
	Access and Services
	A Typical Community Network
	Summary of Network Services
	The BEV Software Tools
	Service Models for Community Networks
	Why Direct Connections are Important
	Network Administration
4. Evaluating the Blacksburg Electronic Village:
	The Assumptions of an Evaluation System
	A Model for the Evaluation of the BEV
	Research Activities in the Four Nodes
	Lessons Learned
5. Town Government in Cyberspace:
	The Key Players in the Town's Involvement in the BEV
	Providing Local Government Information in Cyberspace
	Email Overload? Elements of the Journey into Cyberspace
	Supporting Economic Development
	Cyberspace and the Town's Mission of "Citizen First"
	In Summary -- Lessons Learned
6. Managing the Evolution of a Virtual School:
	Context for a Virtual School
	Early Objectives
	Engaging the Schools
	Managing the Evolution
	Integrating Networking into the Community and the Schools
	Usability Concerns
	Assessment and Prospects
7. Learning and Teaching in a Virtual School:
	Technology and Education
	Constructivist Theory
	Constructivist Practice -- BEV + MCPS = Constructivist Classroom
	Can My School System Do This
8. Conducting Business in a Community Network:
	Engaging the Business Community
	Examples of Use
	Local Economic Development Grants
	Business Needs and Interests
	Successful Business Practices
9. Community Network Technology:
	Basic Internet Technology
	A Concentrated Dose of LAN, WAN, and TCP/IP Fundamentals
	Bringing the Internet to Your Town
	Local delivery
	High-Speed Local Delivery
	Serving the Public -- Required and Optional Internet Servers
	What the BEV Used
	Fiber on Main Street -- New Technology Opportunities
	Technology Planning Summary
	Recommended Resources
10. Managing Information in a Community Network:
	Step 1 - Develop and Distribute the Tools
	Step 2 - Identify Project Champions
	Step 3 - Educate, Educate, Educate
	Step 4: Foster a Rich Information Space
	Step 5: Deliver the Message Effectively
	Step 6: Link the Real and Virtual Communities
	Checklist for Managing Information in a Community Network
11. Building an Online History Database:
	Overview
	System Architecture
	Interface
	Usage
	Issues
	Summary
12. Success Factors of the Blacksburg Electronic Village:
	Education, Not Technology
	Low-Cost Direct Connections
	Show, Don't Tell
	Find a Project Evangelist
	The Golden Age of Libraries
	Breadth and Depth of Content Drive Use
	Keep Modem Pool Access in the Private Sector
	Community Support
	Community, Not Technology

Bookmark: B.Tuthill.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Creating Worldwide Software: Solaris International Developer's Guide
Author: Tuthill, Bill
Author: Smallberg, David
Date: 1997
Pages: 416
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-494493-3
Keywords: Sun Solaris, Unix
Note: 2nd Edition
Contents:
1. Winning in Global Markets
2. Understanding Linguistic and Cultural
3. Encoding Character Sets
4. Establishing Your Locale Environment
5. Messaging for Program Translation
6. Displaying Localized Text
7. Handling Language Input
8. Working with CDE
9. Motif Programming
10. X11 Programming
11. Communicating Network Data
12. Writing International Documentation
13. Product Localization
14. Standards Organizations
15. Internationalization Checklist
A. Languages, Territories, and Locale Names
B. Locale Summaries and Keyboard Layouts

Bookmark: B.Heinle.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing With JavaScript: Creating Dynamic Web Pages (Web Review Studio Series)
Author: Heinle, Nick
Date: 1997
Pages: 256
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-300-6
Contents:
Foreword
Preface
1. Diving into JavaScript
2. Doing Windows
3. Controlling Frames
4. Forms and Functions
5. Getting in Line with Arrays
6. Too Many Browsers? Not Really
7. Dynamic Images
8. Customizing a Site with Cookies
9. Dynamic HTML
10. Getting Acquainted with Layers
11. The Show: Dynamic HTML Applied
12. Advanced Applications
Epilogue
A. The Document Object Model
B. Event Handlers
C. Which Browser Supports What?
D. JavaScript Syntax

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Date: 1997
Pages: 638
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-69497-2
Note: Third Edition
Weblink: www.aw-bc.com/DTUI3
Contents:
1. Human Factors of Interactive Software
2. Theories, Principles, and Guidelines
3. Managing Design Processes
4. Expert Reviews, Usability Testing, Surveys, and Continuing Assessments
5. Software Tools
6. Direct Manipulation and Virtual Environments
7. Menu Selection, Form Fillin, and Dialog Boxes
8. Command and Natural Languages
9. Interaction Devices
10. Response Time and Display Rate
11. Presentation Styles: Balancing Function and Fashion
12. Printed Manuals, Online Help, and Tutorials
13. Multiple-Window Strategies
14. Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
15. Information Search and Visualization
Ch. 16. Hypermedia and the World Wide Web
Afterword: Societal and Individual Impact of User Interfaces

Bookmark: B.Sureth.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing Natural Language Interfaces: Processing Human Conversations
Author: Suereth, Russell
Date: 1997
Pages: 312
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07913017-8
Contents:
Preface
1. A Basic Conversation Processor
	The Processes in a Conversation Processor
	Knowledge in a Conversation Processor
	Conversation Processors and Natural Language Processors
	An Overview of a Basic Conversation Processor
	Reading the Input Sentence and Extracting the Words
	Looking Up Words in the Dictionary
	Word Types in the Input Sentence
	Identifying the Sentence Structure in the Input Sentence
	Identifying Semantic Items in the Input Sentence
	Generating a Response
	Developing a Conversation Processor
2. Knowledge about Grammatical Sentences
	Knowledge in a Conversation Processor
	Representing Knowledge
	Limitations when Representing Knowledge
	Grammatical Sentence Knowledge
	Explaining Grammar Errors
	Generating a Grammatical Response
	Incorporating Knowledge into Your Conversation Processor
3. Appearing to Understand Time
	Problems in Language Understanding
	Problems in Language Understanding for Language Processors
	Understanding in a Conversation Processor
	The Meaning of Input Sentence Words
	Resolving Ambiguous Meaning
	Resolving Incomplete Meaning
	Resolving Inconsistent Meaning
	Generating the Response to Appear to Understand
	Incorporating Understanding into Your Conversation Processor
4. Syntactic Analysis of Phrases
	Syntactic Analysis in Natural Language Processors
	Identifying Phrases in a Conversation Processor
	Resolving Grammar Problems
	Incorporating Phrase Identification into Your Conversation Processor
5. Semantic Analysis of Semantic Items
	Semantic Analysis in Natural Language Processing
	Identifying Semantic Items in Your Conversation Processor
	Incorporating Semantic-Item Identification into Your Conversation Processor
6. Appearing to Understand Idioms and Synonyms
	Idioms and Synonyms
	Processing Idioms in a Conversation Processor
	Processing Synonyms in a Conversation Processor
	Incorporating Idiom Processing into Your Conversation Processor
	Incorporating Synonym Processing into Your Conversation Processor
7. Generating Questions
	Appearing to Have Needs and a Purpose
	Pragmatic Analysis
	Generating Questions in a Conversation Processor
	Limitations of the Conversation Processor in This Chapter
	Incorporating Question Generation into Your Conversation Processor
8. Semantic Constraints
	Constraints
	Semantic Constraints in a Conversation Processor
	Action and Subject Constraints
	Determiner and Noun Constraints
	Adjective Position Constraints
	Counting Constraints
	Incorporating Semantic Constraints into Your Conversation Processor
9. Handling Diverse Types of Input Sentences
	Types of Sentences
	Semantic Features of Diverse Sentences
	Handling Diverse Sentences in a Conversation Processor
	Identifying Multiple Actions
	Identifying Multiple Subject Descriptions
	Identifying Multiple Manners
	Copying Semantic Information
	Incorporating Diverse Sentence Processing into Your Conversation Processor
10. Appearing to Understand a Text
	Processing Texts
	Processing Texts in a Natural Language Processor
	Processing Texts in a Conversation Processor
	Incorporating Text Understanding into Your Conversation Processor
	Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Weinschenk.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: GUI Design Essentials
Author: Weinschenk, Susan
Author: Jamar, Pamela
Author: Yeo, Sarah C.
Date: 1997
Pages: 344
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-17549-8
Note: Includes CD-Rom
Contents:
Preface
PART I THE PROCESS OF INTELLIGENT INTERFACE DESIGN
1 An Overview of Intelligent Interface Design
	A Tale of Two Software Projects
	What Is an Interface?
	Why Intelligent Interface Design?
	Why an Interface Design Process?
	The Three Phases of Interface Design
	Interface Design Is not a Search for the Holy Grail
2 Analysis
	Purpose
	Deliverables
	Preparation
	Process
3 Design
	Purpose
	Deliverables
	Preparation
	Process
4 Construction
	Purpose
	Deliverables
	Preparation
	Process
5 Usability Testing
	Identify the Scope of the Test
	Plan and Prepare for the Test
	Conduct the Test
	Analyze and Report Test Results
6 Designing for the Web
	Analysis for Web Sites
	Design for Web Sites
	Construction of Web Sites
	Testing of Web Sites
PART II DESIGN GUIDELINES
7 Designing for People
	Cognitive Considerations
	Visual Considerations
	Physical Considerations
	Environmental and Social Issues
	The Purpose of the Interface
	About Guidelines
8 Structure
	Primary and Secondary Windows
	Dialog Boxes
	Tabs
	Menus
	Menu Bars
	Drop-Down Menus
	Pop-Up Menus
	Roll-Up Menus
	Toolbars
	Relationship between Toolbars, Command Buttons, and Menus
9 Interaction
	Command Buttons
	Option Buttons
	Check Boxes
	Text Boxes
	List Boxes
	Multiple Selection List Boxes
	Tables and Grids
	Spin Boxes
	Sliders
	Tree Views
10 Presentation
	Screen Layout
	Fonts
	Color Choices and Combinations
	Designing or Choosing Graphics
	Charts and Graphs
11 Internet and Intranet
	Site Design
	Navigation
	Page Layout
	Page Titles and Headings
	Frames and Windows
	Graphics
	Backgrounds
	Color
	Fonts
	Readability
	Netiquette
	Multimedia
	International Issues
12 Online Support
	Online Help
	Wizards
13 Best Practices for Customizing, Implementing, and Maintaining Guidelines
	Whom to Involve
	What to Customize
	Project Planning for Customizing Guidelines
	Implementing and Maintaining Guidelines
Appendix A List of Guidelines
	Structure
	Interaction
	Presentation
	Internet and Intranet
	Online Support
	Appendix B For More Information
	Interface Design
	Guidelines
	Online Help and Documentation
	Web Design
Appendix C Forms, Tables, and Checklists
Appendix D How to Use the Files on CD-ROM

Bookmark: B.Fowler.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: GUI Design Handbook
Author: Fowler, Susan L.
Date: 1997
Pages: 320
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-059274-8
Contents:
Preface
GUI Design from A to Z
Check Box
Combo Box
Command Line
Cursor
Dialog Box, Expanding
Dialog Box, Standard
Dialog Box, Tabbed
Drop-Down List Box
Field, Entry
Field, Protected
Field, Required
Graph
Icon, Desktop
Iconic Label
Keyboard Shortcuts: Mnemonic, Accelerator
Label
List Box, Multiple-Selection
List Box, Single-Selection
Menubar
Menu, Drop-Down
Menu, Pop-Up
Message Box
Online Help, Context-Sensitive
Online Help, Procedural
Online Help, Reference
Palette
Pointer
Progress Indicator
Pushbutton
Radio Button
Scroll Bar
Slide Bar
Slider
Spin Box
Status Bar
Table
Toolbar
Tooltip
Window
Wizard
Appendix A: How to Design a Good GUI
Appendix B: Usability Tests
Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Arlov.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: GUI Design for Dummies
Series Title: For Dummies
Author: Arlov, Laura
Date: 1997
Pages: 392
Publisher: IDG Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-76450213-1
Note: Includes CD-Rom
Contents:
Introduction
I: IDENTIFYING GOALS AND CONSTRAINTS
	1: Deciding Where You're Going
	2: Asking the Right Questions
	3: Organizing the Work
II: SURVIVING THE EARLY DESIGN STAGE
	4: Choosing Type and Structure
	5: Pin Up Those Super Models
	6: How Users Get Around: Navigation Models
	7: The GUI Standard
III: DESIGNING GUIS THAT WORK
	8: Learning How Users Work
	9: Task-Oriented Application Design
	10: Task-Oriented Window Design
	11: Making Your GUI Easy to Understand
	12: Making Your GUI Effective to Use
IV: DESIGNING WINDOWS
	13: The ABCs of Visual Design
	14: Color Is Communication
	15: Icons and Graphics
	16: The Right Widget for the Job
V: DOING REALITY CHECKS
	17: A Cookbook for Testing with Users
	18: Testing Stories from True Life
	19: Other Paths to Enlightenment
VI: THE PART OF TENS
	20: Murphy's Laws of GUI Design
	21: Ten Ways to Tell Whether Your GUI Is Good
	22: Ten Things a Project Leader Can Do
	23: Ten Resources for GUI Designers
Appendix: About the CD

Bookmark: B.Redmill.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Safety-Critical Systems
Author: Redmill, Felix
Author: Rajan, Jane
Date: 1997
Pages: 354
Publisher: Butterworth-Heinemann
Standard number: ISBN: 0-75062715-8
Contents:
Preface
PART 1 SAFETY-CRITICAL SYSTEMS AND HUMAN RELIABILITY
1 Introducing Safety-critical Systems
Felix Redmill
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Safety and Safety-critical Systems
1.3 The Human Element in Failure
1.4 A Consideration of Risk
1.5 Hazard and Risk Analysis
1.6 Designing for Safety
1.7 The Safety Case
1.8 Safety Culture
1.9 The Right Questions
2 The Causes of Human Error
Deborah Lucas
2.1 The Aim of this Chapter
2.2 Human Error and Major Accidents
2.3 What Causes Human Errors?
2.4 Some Key Concepts and Distinctions
2.5 Cognitive Models of Human Error
2.6 Practical Use of Models of Error Causation
2.7 Conclusions
3 Human Reliability Assessment: Methods and Techniques
Carlo Cacciabue
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Criteria for Classifying Human Factors Methods
3.3 Methodologies for Human Reliability Assessment
3.4 Methods and Techniques for Human Reliability Analysis
3.5 Comparison of Methods
3.6 Conclusions
PART 2 HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION
4 Introduction to HCI in Safety-critical systems
Graham Storrs
4.1 What Makes HCI Design So Important?
4.2 What Makes HCI Design So Difficult?
4.3 Approaches To User Interface Design
4.4 Where Are The Hazards In User Interfaces?
4.5 Putting User Interfaces in Context
4.6 People Are Not Like Other System Components
4.7 Concluding Remarks
5 Specification of Safety-critical Systems
Jeremy Clare
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The Nature of Specifications
5.3 The Life Cycle Context
5.4 Risk Analysis in the Specification Process
5.5 Fault Tree Analysis for Supporting the Analysis of Likelihood in Risk Evaluation
5.6 Hazard Analysis of Human-centred Systems
5.7 Conclusions
6 Interface Design for Safety-critical Systems
Jane Rajan
6.1 Introduction
6.2 The Display Design Process
6.3 Structuring the Display System
6.4 Representation of Displayed Information
6.5 Abnormal and Emergency Operation
6.6 Conclusion
7 Training and Operator Support
Andrew Shepherd
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Understanding the Task
7.3 Acquisition and Application of Skill
7.4 Making Training and Support Design Choices
7.5 Developing Support Aids for Operators
7.6 Ensuring Safe and Competent Operation through Training
7.7 Assessing Performance
7.8 Concluding Remarks
8 Design and Support for Abnormal Situations
Jonathan Berman
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Behaviour in Abnormal Situations
8.3 Safety-based Support
8.4 Training Support
8.5 Conclusions
PART 3 SOCIO-TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS
9 Social Factors in Safety-critical Systems
Ron Westrum
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Social Factors in the Design Process
9.3 The Conduct of Operations
9.4 Managing the Interfaces
9.5 Conclusion
10 Learning from Incidents at Work
Florus Koornneef
Andrew Hale
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Accident Models
10.3 Accident Analysis Techniques
10.4 The ISA System
10.5 Discussion
11 Procedural Violations - Causes, Costs and Cures
Steve Mason
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Direct Motivators
11.3 Behaviour Modifiers
11.4 A Work Design Approach
11.5 Routine, Situational, Exceptional and Optimising Violations
11.6 Controlling Procedural Violations
11.7 The HFRG Violation Approach
11.8 Conclusions
12 The Treatment of Human Factors in Safety Cases
David Collier
12.1 Regulation and Safety Cases
12.2 The Content of a Safety Case
12.3 Writing Safety Cases and Obtaining Regulatory Approval

Bookmark: B.Wurman.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Architects
Author: Wurman, Richard Saul
Date: 1997
Pages: 240
Publisher: Watson-Guptill
Standard number: ISBN: 1-88800138-0

Bookmark: B.Korghage.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Storage and Retrieval
Author: Korfhage, Robert R.
Date: 1997
Pages: 349
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-14338-3
Contents:
Overview
Document and Query Forms
Query Structures
The Matching Process
Text Analysis
User Profiles and Their Use
Multiple Reference Point Systems
Retrieval Effectiveness Measures
Effectiveness Improvement Techniques
Alternative Retrieval Techniques
Output Presentation
Document Access
The Ectosystem and Policy Issues
Appendices
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Johnson.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interface Culture: How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
Author: Johnson, Steven A.
Date: 1997
Pages: 272
City: San Francisco
Publisher: Harper & Row
Standard number: ISBN: 0-06251482-2
Contents:
Preface: Electric Speed
1 Bitmapping: An Introduction
2 The Desktop
3 Windows
4 Links
5 Text
6 Agents
Conclusion: Infinity Imagined

Bookmark: B.Bickford.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interface Design: the Art of Developing Easy-to-Use Software
Series Title: Professional
Author: Bickford, Peter
Date: 1997
Pages: 306
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12095860-0
Contents:
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Introduction
A Failure to Communicate
Easy to Use
Part I Designing for a Complex World
	Chapter 1 Constraints
		Designing for a Complex World, Part I
		Constraints Reduce Complexity
		Moving from the General to the Specific
	Chapter 2 Intelligence
		Designing for a Complex World, Part 2
		"Stupid Computer!"
		Basic Intelligence
		Delight the User
		Help the Computer Know Itself
		Intelligent Agents: Computerized Assistants
		Be Specific and Don't Go Too Far
	Chapter 3 In Search of Elegance: Designing for the Mass Market
		Designing for a Complex World, Part 3
		Back to the Feature
		Everything to All People
		Feature Creep Carefully
		The 80/20 Solution
		Dealing with Offers You Can't Refuse
	Chapter 4 Details! Details!
		Designing for a Complex World, Part 4
		The Illusion of Interface Design
		If It's Not All Right, It's All Wrong
	Chapter 5 Transparency, or Death Comes to Bob the Waiter
		Designing for a Complex World, Part 5
		"Hi, I'm Bob! I'll Be Your Waiter for This Evening!"
		The Extra HI Design Mile
Part II General Design Issues
	Chapter 6 Error Messages
		Ban the Bomb
		Minimize the Damage
		Prevent Errors
		Know Your Audience
		What Do I Do Now?
		Building a Better Error Message
	Chapter 7 Preferences
		Preferences, Persistence, and the Soft Machine
		Make Your Own Design Decisions
		Setup Choices
		Default Settings and the Soft Machine
		Hard Machines, Persistent Preferences
		Disappearing Preferences
	Chapter 8 Toolbars
		Toolbars
		On the Strengths of Button-Driven Interfaces
		But on the Other Hand
		And the Magic Number Is
		Some Guidelines
	Chapter 9 Tabbed Dialogs and Progressive
		Disclosure
		Tabs
		Limiting Complexity
		Progressive Disclosure in Practice
		"More Choices"/"Fewer Choices" Buttons,
		Disclosure Triangles
		Spring-Loaded Dialog Boxes
		Pop-Ups
		Icon Lists
		And Then There Were Tabs
	Chapter 10 Icons
		Comics, Icons, and Interface
		The Strange Power of Icons
		Icons Are a Canvas for Your Experience
		Clear Pictures for Clear Communication
		Learning from Comics
	Chapter 11 Speed and Feedback
		Speed
		Real Speed and Perceived Speed
		Maximizing Real Speed
		Do Visible Work First
		Faking Out the User
	Chapter 12 Localization
		Fluent Interfaces, Part One: Speaking the Language
		The Tyranny of the Typewriter
		Growing Up
		Great Expectations
	Chapter 13 Cross-Platform Development
		Fluent Interfaces, Part Two: Ports
		A Cautionary Tale
		When in Rome
		Travel Guides to Foreign Platforms
		Coding for Cross-Platform Products
		Beware the Least Common Denominator
	Chapter 14 Cultural Issues of Cross-Platform
		Development
		Culture Clash
		Cross-Platform/Cross-Culture
		Understanding the Other Side
		Avoid the Red Flags
Part III Web Design, Networks, and Corporate Computing
	Welcome to the Wild West of Human Interface
	Chapter 15 Usability in the Business World
		A Few Tips on Designing for Enterprise Computing
		Mainframes and the Menu Bar
		Designing for Data Entry, Part 1: Keyboard Shortcuts Revisited
		Designing for Data Entry, Part 2: Return,
		Enter, and Default
		Fun with Feedback
	Chapter 16 Database Interface Design
		Designing Databases That Don't Torture the
		User. Saving Your Database's Interface in Eight Easy Steps
		Design for Data Entry, Revisited
		Make the Menus Make Sense
		Design for the User, Not the Database
		Put a Real, Native Interface on Your Database
		Feedback and Speed
		Avoid Toolbar Overkill
		Practice Good Visual Design
		Try It Out on Real Users
		The Rewards of Good Database Design
	Chapter 17 Menus and Large Systems
		Menu Bar Madness
		Menus Are the Map to the Application
		The File Menu and Documentless Applications
	Chapter 18 Forms Layout and Status Messages
		The Eyes Have It
		Follow the Reading Path
		Tunnel Vision
		Warning! Warning!
	Chapter 19 Information Systems
		House-hunting in the Information Age
		Data vs. Information
		Sins of Omission: Information Arbitrage
		Data Corruption: When What You See Is Not What You Get
		Flexible Searching: Getting the
		Information the User Really Wants
		Visualizing the Results
	Chapter 20 Network and Network Applications
		Network Nirvana
		Get the User Out of the Network
		Configuration Business
		Shopping the 'Net: Three Types of Navigation
		The Basics Still Apply--They're Just More Advanced
	Chapter 21 Designing for the World Wide Web
		If You Build It, Will They Come?
		Find a Metaphor
		It's In Here Somewhere
		Make the Experience Enjoyable
Part IV Multimedia
	Chapter 22 The Role of Multimedia
		I've Seen the Future
		State of the Art
		I've Seen the Future
		Back at Work--The Shape of Things to Come
	Chapter 23 Game Design
		Addictive Interfaces/Building Interfaces
		Your Users Can't Stop Using
		Secrets of Successful Games
	Chapter 24 Sound
		Sound + Vision, Part 1: Things That Go
		"Boop!" in the Night
		Theory and Reality
		Use Different Sounds to Indicate
		Different Meanings
		Use Different Volume Levels for Different Messages
		Characteristics of "Good" Sounds
		Calling In the Pros
	Chapter 25 Animation and Movies
		Sound + Vision, Part 2: Moving Objects and Motion Pictures
		Animation Zen
		Better Than the Real World?
		Telling Tales with Video
		Storytelling 101
		Text, Hypertext, and Video
	Chapter 26 Interactivity and Design Philosophy
		Headhunters and Multimedia
		The Phone Call
		The Problem
		Beauty Isn't Everything
		Learning from Video Games, Part 2
		Make Your Products Usable, Not Just Appealing
Part V Beyond the Guidelines: Tips for the
	Practicing Designer
	Chapter 27 Guerrilla Usability Testing
		Usability Testing
		Testing Code Instead of Software
		Lab Coat Not Required
		A Brief Lesson in Conducting a Usability Test
		Win Friends and Change Minds
		The All-Important Paradox of Usability Testing
		Keeping Us Honest
	Chapter 28 Prototyping
		Murder Your Children
		Rapid Prototyping versus Quick-Dry Mental Cement
		Egoless Programming and the Value of Mistakes
		It May Be Your Best Idea, But It Won't Be
		Your Last Idea
	Chapter 29 Extending the Guidelines
		Rules for Breaking the Rules
		Going Beyond the Guidelines
	Chapter 30 Product Updates
		This Old Interface
		Repair, Remodel, or Renovate?
		Interface Repair--Getting Visible Results for Little Effort
		Interface Remodeling--Major Attacks on a Few Bad Problems
		Renovation--Cracks in the Foundation
	Chapter 31 Avoiding Interface Fads
		Fad Gadgets
		1989: The NeXT Computer, and All Things Dark and Beveled
		1990: Tear-Offs
		1992: The Rise of the Toolbar
		1993: Fade to Gray
		1994 and Beyond: Collaboration
		Building the Next Big Thing
	Chapter 32 Case Study: Interfaces that Work, and Why
		A Few of My Favorite Things
		Adobe Photoshop--Making Novices Look Good
		MacWrite Pro--Elegance and Attention to Detail
		Help!--Taking the Terror Out of Errors
		Norton Utilities--Keeping Problems from Being the User's Problem
		TouchBase--Making Life Easier for the User
		SoftPolish--A Power Tool for Getting the Details Right
		It's Not All Bad
	Chapter 33 Case Study:

Bookmark: B.Ray.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience
Author: Ray, William J.
Date: 1997
Pages: 476
City: Pacific Grove, California
Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53420346-9
Note: Fifth Edition

Bookmark: B.Angelides.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Multimedia Information Systems
Series Title: Kluwer International Series in EnGineering and Computer Science: Volume 398
Author: Angelides, Marios C.
Author: Dustdar, Schahram
Date: 1997
Pages: 224
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-9915-3
Weblink: www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-9915-3
Contents:
1. The Multimedia Information Systems Revolution: The Unfolding of a Reality
2. Architectures of Multimedia Information Systems
3. Networked Multimedia Information Systems
4. Multimedia on the Information Superhighway
5. Application Frameworks for Multimedia Information Systems
6. Organisational Impacts of Multimedia Information Systems
7. Multimedia Authoring Systems
8. The Challenge of Multimedia Information Systems to the MIS Manager
9. Epilogue

Bookmark: B.Brice.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Multimedia and Virtual Reality Engineering
Author: Brice, Richard
Date: 1997
Pages: 320
Publisher: Newnes
Standard number: ISBN: 0-75062987-8
Note: Includes CD-Rom
Contents:
Preface
PART I Media: Sound, Image and Text
1 Introduction to Multimedia and Virtual Reality
	1.1 Multimedia and virtual reality: a brave new world
	1.2 Disciplines: the interdisciplinary nature of multimedia and VR development
	1.3 The senses
2 Sound
	2.1 The physics of sound
	2.2 The physiology of hearing
	2.3 The psychology of hearing
	2.4 Spatial hearing
	2.5 Recording technology
		2.5.1 Microphones
		2.5.2 Microphone pre-amplifiers
		2.5.3 Mix amplifiers
		2.5.4 Equalizers and tone-controls
		2.5.5 Power amplifiers
		2.5.6 Loudspeakers and enclosures
3 Waveform Generation and Synthesis
	3.1 Function Generation
	3.2 Additive synthesis
	3.3 FM synthesis
	3.4 Sampling
	3.5 Wavetable synthesis
	3.6 MIDI
	3.7 Speech synthesis
4 Image
	4.1 The physics of light
	4.2 The physiology of the eye
	4.3 Psychology of vision
		4.3.1 Colour perception
		4.3.2 Persistence of vision
		4.3.3 Depth
	4.4 Film and television
	4.4.1 Television signals
	4.4.2 Colour television
	4.5 Switching and combining of video signals
	4.6 Computer video standards
	4.7 Vector and bitmap graphics: What's the difference?
	4.7.1 Graphics file formats
5 Text, Hypertext
	5.1 Text in the electronic world
	5.2 Text files and the ASCII standard
	5.3 Word processors, their uses, file formats and importability/exportability
	5.4 Fonts, typefaces and layout
	5.5 Hypertext
6 Digital Audio and Digital Video
	6.1 Being Digital
	6.2 Sampling theory: A to D and D to A conversion
	6.3 Description of digital audio and digital video standard interfaces
		6.3.1 Introduction to digital audio interfacing
		6.3.2 Practical digital audio interface
		6.3.3 Introduction to digital video and the digital video interfaces
		6.3.4 Protocol description: general
		6.3.5 Serial digital video interface
		6.3.6 Embedding digital audio in the digital video interface
	6.4 Digital image processing
		6.4.1 Point operations
		6.4.2 Window operations
	6.5 Data compression techniques
		6.5.1 Image data compression
		6.5.2 Audio data compression
7 Computers
	7.1 Hardware platforms
	7.2 Capture and playback hardware
	7.3 Peripheral hardware and software tools
PART II Media Production and Hardware
8 Audio Production
	8.1 Production tools and concepts
		8.1.1 Multitrack recording and mixers
		8.1.2 Delay
		8.1.3 Reverb
		8.1.4 Stereo panning
		8.1.5 Distortion
		8.1.6 Noise gates and compressors
		8.1.7 Audio enhancers
	8.2 Digital audio production
		8.2.1 Hard-disk editing
		8.2.2 MIDI sequencing
		8.2.3 A practical look at sampling rates and audio compromises required for CD-ROM
	8.3 A typical mixed-media audio production
9 Video Production
	9.1 Stage 1: Pre-production planning
		9.1.1 Scripting
		9.1.2 Storyboarding
		9.1.3 Writing the production schedule
	9.2 Stage 2: Production shoot
		9.2.1 Camera
		9.2.2 Lighting
		9.2.3 Sound
	9.3 Stage 3: Video post-production
		9.3.1 What is a video transition?
		9.3.2 The cut
		9.3.3 The dissolve
		9.3.4 The fade
		9.3.5 Wipes and reverse wipes
		9.3.6 Keys
		9.3.7 Preview
	9.4 Working with a computer
		9.4.1 Keying-in computer graphics
		9.4.2 The computer as editor
	9.5 Advanced video production techniques
		9.5.1 Introduction
		9.5.2 Monochrome
		9.5.3 Split-screens
		9.5.4 Posterize
		9.5.5 Chroma-key
	9.6 Notes on audio in video post-production
10 Computer Graphics and Animation
	10.1 The role of the computer
		10.1.1 Types of animation
		10.1.2 Software
	10.2 2D graphics and animation
		10.2.1 Paint functions
		10.2.2 Compositing
		10.2.3 Video effects
		10.2.4 Rotorscoping
	10.3 3D graphics and animation
11 Multimedia Authoring
	11.1 Interactive multimedia authoring
	11.2 Windows and OLE
		11.2.1 WAV files
		11.2.2 BMP files
		11.2.3 MID files
		11.2.4 AVI files
	11.3 Macromedia Authorware Professional as an authoring environment
		11.3.1 Incorporating files
		11.3.2 Design of buttons/hot-spots
		11.3.3 Animation
		11.3.4 Packaging: generation of EXE files
	11.4 Graphical browsers
	11.5 HTML files and the Internet
PART III Virtual Reality
12 Realistic Auditory Stimulation
	12.1 Spatial hearing theory revisited
	12.2 Binaural techniques
		12.2.1 Binaural microphone technique
		12.2.2 Synthetic binaural soundfields
		12.2.3 Limitations of binaural technique
	12.3 Creation of sound-fields using loudspeakers
		12.3.1 Binaural cancellation techniques and their limitations
		12.3.2 Blumlein's technique for stereophony
		12.3.3 FRANCINSTIEN stereophonic image enhancement technique
	12.4 Creation of synthetic, realistic sound fields using loudspeakers
		12.4.1 Dolby surround
		12.4.2 Ambisonics
	12.5 Commercial 3D from two loudspeakers
		12.5.1 Roland RSS system and Thorn EMI Sensaura
		12.5.2 OM 3D sound processor
13 Realistic Visual Stimulation
	13.1 Stereoscopy and display of stereoscopic television images
		13.1.1 Colour analglyph displays
		13.1.2 Polarized displays
		13.1.3 Field sequential displays
		13.1.4 Head-mounted displays
		13.1.5 Autostereoscopy: stereoscopic displays not requiring glasses
	13.2 Depth enhancement techniques
14 Cyberspace
	14.1 What is virtual reality?
	14.2 The other senses
	14.3 Physical interaction
	14.4 Practical virtual reality systems
	14.5 'Cyberatmosphere' -- stepping stones to cyberspace
Appendix 1: The Fourier transform
Appendix 2: A top-down, non-linear model of the binaural and monaural signal processing for auditory localization

Bookmark: B.Aftab.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Parents Guide to the Internet: And How to Protect Your Children in Cyberspace
Author: Aftab, Parry
Date: 1997
Pages: 328
Publisher: Sc Pr Inc
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96604910-1

Bookmark: B.Lesk.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Practical Digital Libraries: Books, Bytes, and Bucks
Series Title: Multimedia Information and Systems
Date: 1997
Pages: 300
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860459-6
Contents:
1 Evolution of Libraries
1.1 Why Digital Libraries?
1.2 History and Change
1.3 Advantages of Digital Libraries
1.4 Rise of Printing and Libraries
1.5 Vannevar Bush
1.6 Computer Technology
1.6.1 Processors
1.6.2 Memory Technology
1.6.3 Software
1.7 Information and Software
1.8 Summary
2 Text Access Methods
2.1 Computer Typesetting and Online Databases
2.2 Text Formats
2.3 Linear Text Searching
2.4 Inverted Files
2.5 Hash Coding
2.6 Other Text Search Issues
2.7 Thesauri
2.8 Document Conversion
2.9 Summary
3 Images of Pages
3.1 Scanning and Fax Machines
3.2 Image Formats for Scanned Printed Pages
3.3 Display Requirements
3.4 PostScript, Acrobat, and Reprinting
3.5 Indexing Images of Pages
3.6 Shared Text/Image Systems
3.7 Image Storage vs. Book Storage
3.8 Summary
4 Multimedia Storage and Access
4.1 Sound Formats: Vinyl, Tape, and CD
4.2 Pictures: GIF and JPEG
4.3 Automatic Speech Recognition
4.4 Moving Images: MPEG and Motion JPEG
4.5 Indexing Images: Motion Segmentation
4.6 Summary
5 Knowledge Representation Methods
5.1 Library Classification
5.2 Indexing Words and Thesauri
5.3 Artificial Intelligence Structures
5.4 Hypertext
5.5 Vector Models
5.6 History-Based Information Resources
5.7 New Information Techniques
5.8 Summary
6 Distribution
6.1 Physical Objects: Books and CD-ROMs
6.2 Computer Network Technologies
6.2.1 Packets vs. Circuits
6.2.2 Stars vs. Buses
6.2.3 Ethernet
6.2.4 Arpanet and Addressing
6.3 Security on the Net
6.4 Cryptography
6.5 Summary
7 Usability and Retrieval Evaluation
7.1 General Human Factors Considerations
7.2 Text Displays: Fonts and Highlighting
7.3 Image Displays and Compression Systems
7.3.1 Text
7.3.2 Speech
7.3.3 Images
7.4 Interface Controls: Menus and Keywords
7.5 Access Methods
7.6 Retrieval Evaluation
7.7 Summary
8 Collections and Preservation
8.1 Traditional Paper Collections
8.2 Traditional Preservation Problems: Acid Paper and Perfect Binding
8.3 Digitizing Special Collections and Archives
8.4 Sharing of Collections among Libraries
8.5 New Kinds of Material and Their Durability
8.6 Summary and Responsibilities to the Future
9 Economics
9.1 Traditional Economics and Economies of Scale
9.2 Scholarly Publications Today
9.3 Models for Library Funding
9.4 Paying for Electronic Information
9.5 Access versus Ownership
9.6 Importance of Administrative Costs
9.7 Electronic Commerce
9.8 The Future of Quality Information
9.9 Summary
10 Intellectual Property Rights
10.1 History of Copyright Law
10.2 History of Patent Law
10.3 Other Legal Risks
10.4 National Information Infrastructure Dangers
10.5 Intellectual Property Protection
10.5.1 Fractional Access
10.5.2 Control of Interface
10.5.3 Hardware Locks ("Dongles")
10.5.4 Repositories
10.5.5 Steganography
10.5.6 Cryptolopes, or Secret Envelopes
10.5.7 Special Hardware
10.5.8 Economic Approaches
10.5.9 Flickering
10.6 Summary: Future Research and Law
11 International Activities
11.1 Information Policy, Not Industrial Policy
11.2 United States
11.2.1 University of California at Berkeley
11.2.2 University of Michigan
11.2.3 University of Illinois
11.2.4 Stanford University
11.2.5 University of California at Santa Barbara
11.2.6 Carnegie Mellon University
11.2.7 Other U.S. Projects
11.3 United Kingdom
11.4 France
11.5 Other EU Efforts
11.6 Japan
11.7 Australia
11.8 Elsewhere
11.9 International Cooperation
11.10 Summary
12 Future: Ubiquity, Diversity, Creativity, and Public Policy
12.1 Dream to Be Realized
12.2 Future Roles in Information Handling
12.3 Effect of Digital Technology on Universities
12.4 Society and Creativity
12.5 Public Policy Questions
12.6 Projections

Bookmark: B.Dyson.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Release 2.0: A Design for Living in the Digital Age
Author: Dyson, Esther
Date: 1997
Pages: 224
Publisher: Broadway Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-76790011-1
Contents:
1. How I got the story and learned to love markets
2. Communities
3. Work
4. Education
5. Governance
6. Intellectual property
7. Content control
8. Privacy
9. Anonymity
10. Security
11. A design for living

Bookmark: B.Hackos.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Standards for Online Communication: Publishing Information for the Internet/World Wide Web/Help Systems/Corporate Intranets
Author: Hackos, JoAnn T.
Author: Stevens, Dawn M.
Date: 1997
Pages: 380
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-15695-7
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
1. Defining the Process
2. Learning About Your Users' Information Needs
3. Determining the Stages of Use
4. Categorizing Information Needs
5. Recognizing the Implications of Design Research
6. Structuring Your Online System
7. Adding Hypertext Links
8. Structuring Your Topics
9. Testing Your Design and Implementation
10. the Right Tools
11. Designing the Information Interface
12. Ensuring Accessibility
13. Providing Navigation Aids
14. Composing Your Topics
15. Writing for Readability
16. Adding Graphics
17. Moving Forward with Multimedia
A List of Guidelines
B Bibliography
C Using the CD-ROM

Bookmark: B.Pfaffenberger.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Hypertext Style
Series Title: Professional
Author: Pfaffenberger, Bryan
Date: 1997
Pages: 297
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12553142-7

Bookmark: B.Bringhurst.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Typographic Style
Author: Bringhurst, Robert
Date: 1997
Pages: 320
Publisher: Hartley & Marks
Standard number: ISBN: 0-88179132-6 (hdbk) 0-88179133-4 (pbk)
Note: Second Edition
Contents:
Foreword
Historical Synopsis
1 The Grand Design
2 Rhythm & Proportion
3 Harmony & Counterpoint
4 Structural Forms & Devices
5 Analphabetic Symbols
6 Choosing & Combining Type
7 Historical Interlude
8 Shaping the Page
9 The State of the Art
10 Prowling on Specimen Books
A: Sorts & Characters
B: Glossary of Terms
C: Type Designers
D: Typefoundries
E: Recapitulation
F: Further Reading
Afterword to the Second Edition

Bookmark: B.Mandel.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of User Interface Design
Author: Mandel, Theo
Date: 1997
Pages: 440
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-16267-1
Contents:
1. Designing Quality Software User Interfaces
2. What Is a User Interface?
3. User Interface Models
4. The Psychology of Humans and Computers
5. The Golden Rules of User Interface Design
6. Computer Standards and User Interface Guidelines
7. Software Usability Testing
8. User Interface Evolution: Command-Lines and Menus
9. User Interface Evolution: Graphical User Interfaces
10. Object-Oriented User Interfaces: The New World
11. Object-Oriented User Interfaces: Meeting User Needs
12. An Iterative User Interface Design Process
13. The Interface Designer's Toolkit
14. Help, Advisors, Wizards, and Multimedia
15. Social User Interfaces and Intelligent Agents
16. The New World of PC-Internet User Interfaces

Bookmark: B.Douglas.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Ergonomics of Computer Pointing Devices
Series Title: Advanced Perspectives in Applied Computing
Author: Douglas, Sarah A.
Author: Mithal, Anant Kartik
Date: 1997
Pages: 233
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 3-540-19986-1
Contents:
1. Introduction
1.1 Approach
1.2 The Organization of This Book
1.3 Importance and Future of Pointing Device Ergonomics
2. Human Motor Performance
2.1 Fitts' Law
2.2 Psychomotor Models
2.3 Other Aspects of Motor Behavior
2.4 Summary
2.5 Endnotes
3. Factors in Applying Psychomotor Studies to Pointing Devices
3.1 Devices: Operation, Features and Types
3.2 Limb Control
3.3 Tasks
3.4 Summary
4. A Survey of Ergonomic Studies
4.1 Studies by Device
4.2 Comparison Between Devices
4.3 Summary
4.4 Endnotes
5. Evaluating New Devices: A Case Study
5.1 Overview
5.2 Introduction
5.3 Previous Research
5.4 Method
5.5 Results
5.6 Discussion
5.7 Conclusions
5.8 Endnotes
6. Using the Microstructure of Movement to Understand Device Performance
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Research Questions
6.3 Method
6.4 Results
6.5 Discussion
6.6 Summary and Conclusions
6.7 Endnotes
7. Performance Models
7.1 Historical Background
7.2 GOMS
7.3 Keystroke Level Model
7.4 Stochastic Network Models
7.5 Extensions to the GOMS Model Research
7.6 Summary
7.7 Endnotes
8. Challenges of the Present and Future
8.1 Review of Pointing Device Research Findings
8.2 Integrating Ergonomics Research into Design
8.3 Innovations in Pointing Device Technology and Interfaces
8.4 Future Research Directions
8.5 Conclusions
8.6 Endnotes
9. Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Andersen.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Theory of Computer Semiotics: Semiotic Approaches to Construction and Assessment of Computer Systems
Series Title: Cambridge Series on Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Andersen, Peter Bøgh
Date: 1997
Pages: 448
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-52144868-9
Note: Updated Edition
Contents:
Preface to second edition
PART I. THEORY
I.1. The structuralist heritage
	I.1.1. Empirical characteristics of two work languages
		The car repair shop
		The Postal Giro
		Technological and organizational change at the Giro
	I.1.2. Other work languages
	I.1.3. Adapting the structuralist framework
		I.1.3.1. Integrating descriptions of symbolic and non-symbolic acts
		I.1.3.2. Integrating the context in linguistic description
		I.1.3.3. Linking linguistic theory with a theory of organizations
		I.1.3.4. The national language should not be taken as the sole basis of linguistic form
		I.1.3.5. Situations and registers as the objects of research
		I.1.3.6. Connect descriptions of language states and language changes
		I.1.3.7. A materialistic view of language
I.2. Adapting and extending structuralist methods
	I.2.1. Basic concepts for describing symbolic acts
		I.2.1.1. Functions and functives
		I.2.1.2. Form/substance, expression/content
		I.2.1.3. The commutation test
		I.2.1.4. Parts and wholes
		I.2.1.5. System and process
		I.2.1.6. Systemic nets: combining process and system
	I.2.2. Adapting and extending the concepts
		I.2.2.1. The work process
		I.2.2.2. Perspectives -- selection, articulation and role
		I.2.2.3. Organizational change
		I.2.2.4. Functions between work context and language
	I.2.3. Computer systems
		I.2.3.1. The concept of system in linguistics
		I.2.3.2. The concept of system in computer science
		I.2.3.3. Differences between the informatic and linguistic concept of system
	I.2.4. Interface and register
		I.2.4.1. Formal and real meaning
		I.2.4.2. Comparing interface and work language
		I.2.4.3. Design as language politics
	I.2.5. Computers as media
PART II. COMPUTERS
Introduction
II.1. The basic means of expression
	II.1.1. Computer-based signs
		II.1.1.1. Handling, transient, and permanent features
		II.1.1.2. Objects as signs
	II.1.2. Analysis of computer-based signs
		II.1.2.1. A typology of computer-based signs
		II.1.2.2. Genres
		II.1.2.3. Direction and scenography of computer-based signs
		II.1.2.4. Using the concepts
	II.1.3. Semiotic aspects of programming
		II.1.3.1. Programming as a meta-semiology
		II.1.3.2. Levels of description: handling features
II.2. Composite computer-based signs
	II.2.1. The structure of composite computer-based signs
		II.2.1.1. The glossematic analytical procedure
		II.2.1.2. Sequential syntagms
		II.2.1.3. Concurrent syntagms
	II.2.2. Styles
		II.2.2.1. Are objects or actions most important?
		II.2.2.2. Who controls the work process?
		II.2.2.3. Cast-iron illusions?
		II.2.2.4. Computer stylistics. Conclusion
PART III. LANGUAGE, WORK, AND DESIGN
Introduction
III.1. Language as interpretation. Semantic fields in the Postal Giro
	III.1.1. Perspective differences at the Postal Giro
		III.1.1.1. C-slips
		III.1.1.2. Perspective on change and time
	III.1.2. Definition of semantic fields
	III.1.3. Using semantic fields for analysis
		III.1.3.1. Systems specification, interface and work language
		III.1.3.2. Changes of semantic fields
	III.1.4. Using semantic fields for design
III.2. Language as action. Language games in the Postal Giro
	III.2.1. A psychological definition of language games
	III.2.2. A linguistic definition of language games
		III.2.2.1. Internal structure of language games
		III.2.2.2. External function of language games
	III.2.3. Using language games for analysis
		III.2.3.1. Language games at the Postal Giro
		III.2.3.2. Language game changes
	III.2.4. Using language games in design
		III.2.4.1. Support for problem-solving
		III.2.4.2. Presence is not enough
		III.2.4.3. Support for mystery-solving: logging the past
		III.2.4.4. Support for forecasting: simulating the future
		III.2.4.5. Support for internal reporting: cooperation and division of labor
III.3. Task analysis. Controlling control
References

Bookmark: B.Waters.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Universal Web Design
Author: Waters, Crystal
Date: 1997
Pages: 450
Publisher: New Riders Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56205-738-3
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
Introduction
1 elements of the web experience
2 navigational rules & options
3 graphic enhancements
4 page sizes
5 text transformations
6 forms & functionality
7 putting it on the table
8 frames
9 sound bytes
10 movin' & shakin'
11 color & contrast
12 the importance of HTML
13 the text-only option
14 downloadables
15 accessibility review & resources
16 WebTV
17 assistive technology & legislation
i connections

Bookmark: B.McGraw.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centered Requirements: The Scenario-Based Engineering Process Approach
Author: McGraw, Karen L.
Author: Harbison, Karan
Date: 1997
Pages: 392
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-2064-7 [cloth] 0-8058-2065-5
Contents:
Part I: Introduction to the Scenario-based Engineering Process
Engineering Activities and Artifacts
Part II: Process & Techniques
Planning and Managing Effective Requirements Activities
Selecting the Right Techniques
Scenario Elicitation, Analysis, and Generation
Conducting and Analyzing Interactive Observation Sessions
Conducting and Using the Interview Effectively
Defining Work Processes and Conducting Task Analysis
Eliciting and Analyzing Domain Concepts
Using Process Tracing to Analyze the Problem-Solving Process
Conducting and Analyzing Group Sessions
Evaluating and Refining Requirements

Bookmark: B.Frascara.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Centred Graphic Design: Mass Communication and Social Change
Author: Frascara, Jorge
Date: 1997
Pages: 176
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7484-0672-7
Contents:
1 Mapping the terrain
	1.1 Visual communication design: a working profile
	1.2 Discipline and interdiscipline
	1.3 The audience
	1.4 The designer
	1.5 Design, meaning, order and freedom
	1.6 Summary
2 Design methods
	2.1 The quantifiable and the human dimension
	2.2 The insufficiency of semiotics
	2.3 Some markers in the field
	2.4 The visualization of strategies
	2.5 Sorting requirements
	2.6 The question of validity in data collection Zoe Strickler
3 Targeting communications: traffic safety project report
	3.1 Introduction
	3.2 Creating a background
	3.3 Profile of the target group
	3.4 The focus group sessions
	3.5 Narrowing down the target group
	3.6 Recommendations for a communication campaign strategy
	3.7 Future action
	3.8 The campaign concept: focus and choices
	3.9 Visualizing ideas
4 Case histories
	4.1 Introduction
	4.2 Australia's Transport Accident Commission Campaign
	4.3 Britain's Health and Social Security forms
	4.4 Australia's Capita Insurance Company forms
	4.5 British Telecom: the telephone book project
5 Profiling the communication designer
	5.1 Introduction
	5.2 The transformation of design Bernd Meurer
	5.3 Deschooling and learning in design education Jan van Toorn
	5.4 Design practice and education: moving beyond the Bauhaus model
		Dietmar Winkler

Bookmark: B.Anshel.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Ergonomics in the Workplace
Author: Anshel, Jeffery
Date: 1997
Pages: 160
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7484-0658-1
Contents:
Introduction
1. Windows to the World
2. The Eye and Visual System
3. Your Workspace and Your Eyes
4. Visual Perception and VDTs
5. Computer Vision Syndrome
6. Vision Examinations
7. Vision in Industry
8. Computing for the Visually Impaired
9. Remedies
10. General Eye Care Tips
11. The Economics of Visual Ergonomics
12. Ergonomic Standards
13. Epilogue
A. VDT Workplace Questionnaire
B. Occupational Vision Requirements Questionnaire
C. Resources for the Blind and Visually Impaired
D. Computer Access Products for Blind and Visually Impaired Users
E. Anti-Glare Screens
F. Additional Resources
G. California Ergonomic Standard
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Tufte.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative
Author: Tufte, Edward R.
Date: 1997
Pages: 156
City: Cheshire, Connecticut
Publisher: Graphics Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-9613921-2-6
Contents:
Images and Quantities
Visual and Statistical Thinking: Displays of
Evidence for Making Decisions
Explaining Magic: Pictorial Instructions and
Disinformation Design
The Smallest Effective Difference
Parallelism: Repetition and Change, Comparison and Surprise
Multiples in Space and Time
Visual Confections: Juxtapositions from the Ocean of the Streams of Story

Bookmark: B.Mijksenaar.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Function: An Introduction to Information Design
Author: Mijksenaar, Paul
Date: 1997
Pages: 56
Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56898-118-X

Bookmark: B.Wainer.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Revelations: Graphical Tales of Fate and Deception from Napoleon Bonaparte to Ross Perot
Author: Wainer, Howard
Date: 1997
Pages: 180
Publisher: Copernicus Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-38794902-X
Contents:
I. Graphical Failures
1. How to Display Data Badly
2. Graphical Mysteries
II. Graphical Triumphs
3. Graphical Answers to Scientific Questions
4. Three Graphic Memorials
5. A Nobel Graph
6. Todai Moto Kurashi
7. Picturing an L.A. Bus Schedule
III. Graphical Forms
8. Humble Pie
9. Double Y-Axis Graphs
10. Tabular Presentation
11. A Rose by Another Name
12. Trilinear Plots
13. Implicit Graphs
IV. Using Graphical Methods
14. Measuring Graphicacy
15. Graphs in the Presidential Campaign: Why Weren't They Used More Broadly?
16. Visual Aids When Comparing an Apple to the Stars
V. Improving Graphical Presentations
17. Integrating Figures and Text
18. Elegance, Grace, Impact, and Graphical Displays
19. Sense-Lining
20. Making Readable Overhead Displays
Finally

Bookmark: B.Spool.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Web Site Usability: A Designer's Guide
Author: Spool, Jared M.
Author: Scanlon, Tara
Author: Schroeder, Will
Author: Snyder, Carolyn
Date: 1997
Pages: 156
Publisher: User Interface Engineering
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96606410-0

Bookmark: B.Dertouzos.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: What Will Be: How the New World of Information Will Change Our Lives
Author: Dertouzos, Michael L.
Date: 1997
Pages: 320
City: San Francisco
Publisher: Harper & Row
Standard number: ISBN: 0-06251479-2
Contents:
I. Shaping the Future
1. Vision
2. The Revolution Unfolds
3. Where Person Meets Machine
4. New Tools
II. How Your Life Will Change
5. Daily Life
6. Pleasure
7. Health
8. Learning
9. Business and Organizations
10. Government
III. Reuniting Technology and Humanity
11. The Value of Information
12. Electronic Bulldozers
13. Electronic Proximity
14. Ancient Humans
Appendix. The Five Pillars of the Information Age

Bookmark: B.Collis.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Children and Computers in School
Author: Collis, Betty A.
Author: Knezek, Gerald A.
Author: Lai, Kwok-Wing
Author: Miyahita, Keiko T.
Author: Pelgrum, Willem J.
Author: Plomp, Tjeerd
Author: Sakamoto, Takashi
Date: 1996
Pages: 166
City: Mahwah, New Jersey
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-2074-4 (paper) 0-8058-2073-6 (cloth)
Contents:
Children in the Information Age
Three Multinational Studies
Information Technology and Children From a Global Perspective
Information Technology and Children from a Classroom Perspective
Information Technology From the Child's Perspective
Reflections

Bookmark: B.Benyon.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Critical Issues in User Interface Systems Engineering
Series Title: Applied Computing
Author: Benyon, David
Author: Palanque, Philippe
Date: 1996
Pages: 294
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 3-54019964-0

Bookmark: B.Zelanski.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design Principles and Problems
Author: Zelanski, Paul
Date: 1996
Pages: 334
Publisher: Holt Rinehart & Winston
Standard number: ISBN: 0-15501615-6
Note: 2nd Edition

Bookmark: B.Sano.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites: A Visual Design Methodology
Author: Sano, Darrell
Date: 1996
Pages: 288
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-14276-X
Contents:
Preliminary Design Preparation
Designing the Organizational Framework
Applying Visual Design for the Web
Visual Design Workshop

Bookmark: B.Druin.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Multimedia Environments for Children
Author: Druin, Allison
Author: Solomon, Cynthia
Date: 1996
Pages: 288
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-11688-2
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
An Introduction: The Multimedia Landscape
1. Origins of Educational Multimedia Environments
2. CD-ROM Edutainment
3. Videodisc Problem-Solving Simulations
4. Children's Multimedia Authoring Tools
5. On-Line Multimedia Environments
6. Physical Multimedia Environments
7. The Activity of Innovation
8. Thoughts About Tomorrow

Bookmark: B.Schriver.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Dynamics in Document Design: Creating Texts for Readers
Author: Schriver, Karen A.
Date: 1996
Pages: 592
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-30636-3
Contents:
Preface
1. What Is Document Design?
2. Evolution of the Field: Contextual Dynamics
3. How Documents Engage Readers' Thinking and Feeling
4. The Impact of Poor Design: Thinking about Ourselves as Users of Texts and Technology
5. Seeing the Text: The Role of Typography and Space
6. The Interplay of Words and Pictures
7. What Document Designers Can Learn from Readers
A. Publications of Interest to Document Designers
B. Common Typographic Symbols
C. Guidelines for Designing Online Displays
Bibliography
Index
Colophon

Bookmark: B.Gloor.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Elements of Hypermedia Design: Techniques for Navigation & Visualization in Cyberspace
Author: Gloor, Peter A.
Date: 1996
Pages: 400
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 0-81763911-X

Bookmark: B.Coe.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors for Technical Communicators
Series Title: Wiley Technical Communication Library
Author: Coe, Marlana
Date: 1996
Pages: 350
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-03530-0
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Sensation and Perception
3. Learning
4. Memory
5. Problem Solving
6. Accessing Information
7. Actions
8. User Partnerships
9. Choosing a Medium
10. Building the Navigational Infrastructure
11. Presenting Information
12. Designing and Developing Content
A: Writing for Other Cultures
B: Human Factors Resources
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Chapanis.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Systems Engineering
Series Title: Wiley Series in Systems Engineering
Author: Chapanis, Alphonse
Date: 1996
Pages: 332
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-13782-0
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Systems and Systems Engineering
3. Standards, Codes, Specifications, and Other Work Products
4. Human-Factors Methods
5. Human Physical Characteristics
6. Human Mental Characteristics
7. Personnel Selection and Training
8. System Requirements
9. Postscript
A. Acronyms and Abbreviations
B. Some ANSI and International Standards

Bookmark: B.Bailey.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Performance Engineering: Designing High Quality, Professional User Interfaces for Computer Products, Applications, and Systems
Author: Bailey, Robert W.
Date: 1996
Pages: 636
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-149634-4
Note: 3rd edition
Contents:
1. Human Engineering Acceptable Performance
2. Human Limits and Differences
3. Sensing and Responding
4. Cognitive Processing and Performance
5. Memory
6. Motivation
7. Iterative Design and Prototyping
8. Usability Studies and Usability Testing
9. Product Analysis and Definition
10. Input and Output Devices
11. Task Analysis
12. Interaction Issues
13. Presentation Issues and User Guidance
14. Written Instructions
15. Training Development
16. Usability Optimization
17. Physical and Social Environment
18. Conducting Comparison Studies Using Statistics
A: Human Performance Engineering (Usability) Resources
B: Guidelines for Developing Questionnaires
C: Guidelines for Designing Forms
D: Workplace Design

Bookmark: B.Kommers.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Hypermedia learning environments: instructional design and integration
Author: Kommers, Piet A. M.
Author: Grabinger, R. Scott
Author: Dunlap, Joanna C.
Date: 1996
Pages: 276
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-1828-6 (paperback) 0-8058-1828-6 (hardcover)
Contents:
Preface
	Purpose
	Goals
	Audience
	Content and Parts
	Limitations
	How to Use this Book
	Acknowledgments
	Software Examples
	Contributors
Part I: Hypermedia and Multimedia Concepts
1. Definitions
		Piet A. M. Kommers
	New Media: Are they Essential to Learning and Teaching
	Definitions
	The Family of New Media
	References
2. Multimedia Environments
		Piet A.M. Kommers
	Hypermedia as Information Resources for Learning
	Three Metaphors underlying Hypermedia
	Learning Through CD-ROM-based Hypermedia
	Conclusion
	References
3. Research on the Use of Hypermedia Piet A.M. Kommers
	Multimedia in the Landscape of Teaching and Learning
	Didactic, Physical, and Epistemic
	Navigation in Hypertext
	Research Line 1: Can hypertext essentially assist in complex mental tasks, such as learning and knowledge acquisition?
	Research Line 2: Which is the best way of interacting between users and a hypertext system?
	Research Line 3: What user interfaces are appropriate for navigation and collaboration in hypertext?
	Research Line 4: Which Is the right granularity to represent knowledge beyond the level of associative links?
	Conclusion
	References
Part II: Developing Hypermedia and Multimedia Applications
4. Nodes and Organization
		Joanna C. Dunlap
		Scott Grabinger
	Node Characteristics
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
5. Links
		Scott Grabinger
		Joanna C. Dunlap
	Characteristics of Links
	Kinds of Links: Contextual Links
	Kinds of Links: Support Links
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
6. Human-Computer Interface Design
		Rose Marra
	HCI Definition
	Basic HCI Principles
	Production Bias
	Assimilation Bias
	Intuitiveness
	Computer as Tool
	Conclusion
	References
7. Screen Design
		Scott Grabinger
	Legibility
	Aesthetic Quality Guidelines
	Basic Typography Guidelines
	Macrolevel Design Guidelines
	Microlevel Design Guidelines
	Conclusion
	References
8. User Support Strategies
		Joanna C. Dunlap
	Orienting Users to the Application
	Facilitating Navigation
	Feedback to Keep Users Informed
	General User Support
	Conclusion
9. Evolution and Maintenance
		Rose Marra
	Definitions
	Rationale for Evolution and Maintenance
	Creating Procedures
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
	References
10. Formative Evaluation
		Martin Tessmer
	Front-end and Formative Evaluation Purposes
	Multimedia Evaluation Needs
	Front-end Evaluation Questions
	Formative Evaluation Questions
	Evaluating the Multimedia Experience and Outcomes
	Conclusion
	References
Part III: Rich Environments for Active Learning
11. Encourage Student Responsibility
		Scott Grabinger
		Joanna C. Dunlap
	REALs
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
	References
12. Make Learning Meaningful
		Joanna C. Dunlap
		Scott Grabinger
	Generative Learning
	Anchored Instruction
	Cooperative Learning and Generativity
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
	References
13. Active Knowledge Construction
		Joanna C. Dunlap
		Scott Grabinger
	Guidelines
	Conclusion
	References
14. Learner Assessment
		Thomas A. Cyr
	Tests versus Assessment
	Basic Premises
	Assessment Guidelines
	Lifelong Learning Competencies and Assessment
	Conclusion
	References
Index

Bookmark: B.Smith.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: ISO and ANSI Ergonomic Standards for Computer Products: A Guide to Implementation and Compliance
Author: Smith, Wanda J.
Date: 1996
Pages: 352
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-151119-X
Contents:
1. Standards and Standards Organizations
2. History of Ergonomic Computer Standards
3. ISO 9241
4. European Ergonomic Requirements
5. North American Ergonomic Standards
6. U.S. Ergonomic Requirements for Special Circumstances
7. Ergonomic Standards in Other Countries
8. Ergonomic Checklists
9. Usability Testing
10. The Impact and Future of Ergonomic Standards
Glossaries
Appendix
Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Hills.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Intranet As Groupware
Author: Hills, Mellanie
Date: 1996
Pages: 308
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-16373-2
Contents:
Introduction
1. What Is an Intranet?
2. What Have Organizations Created Intranets and What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages?
3. How Will Intranets Change You and Your Organization?
4. What Is Groupware and Why Do You Need It?
5. How Do You Use Groupware?
6. Intranet Groupware and Workflow Products
7. How Do You Choose Intranet Groupware and What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages?
8. Building Your Intranet
9. What's So Hard about Groupware?
10. Two Approaches to Implementing Groupware
11. The Impact of Groupware and Workflow
Appendix. Groupware and Intranet Resources

Bookmark: B.Parker.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Looking Good in Print
Author: Parker, Roger C.
Author: Beverly, Carrie
Date: 1996
Pages: 376
Publisher: Ventana Communications Group Inc.
Standard number: ISBN: 1-566044-71-5
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
Introduction
1. Getting Started
2. Tools of Organization
3. The Architecture of Type
4. Building Blocks of Design
5. The Art of Illustration
6. Information Graphics
7. Communicating With Photographs
8. Working With Color
9. Working With Service Bureaus
10. Distribution Media: Newsletters, Tabloids & Newspapers
11. Sales Materials
12. Business Communication
13. Advertising Materials: Response & Collection
14. Common Design Pitfalls
15. Redesign
A. About the Companion CD-ROM
B. Clip Art, Photographs & Font Resources
C. Resources for Desktop Publishers

Bookmark: B.Apple.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Newton 2.0 User Interface Guidelines
Author: Apple Computer, Inc.
Date: 1996
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-48838-8
Contents:
Preface: About This Book
1. Newton and Its Users
2. Container Views
3. Controls
4. Pickers
5. Icons
6. Data Input
7. Routing and Communications
8. Newton Services
Appendix: Avoiding Common Mistakes
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Wall.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Programming Perl
Series Title: Nutshell Handbook
Author: Wall, Larry
Author: Schwartz, Randal L.
Author: Christiansen, Tom
Author: Potter, Stephen
Date: 1996
Pages: 670
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56592-149-6
Note: 2nd Edition
Contents:
Preface
1. An Overview of Perl
2. The Gory Details
3. Functions
4. References and Nested Data Structures
5. Packages, Modules, and Object Classes
6. Social Engineering
7. The Standard Perl Library
8. Other Oddments
9. Diagnostic Messages
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Reilly.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Rapid Prototyping; Moving to Business-Centric Development
Author: Reilly, John P.
Date: 1996
Pages: 286
Publisher: Thomson Computer Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85032193-0
Contents:
Introduction
I. Rapid Application Prototyping
1. Introduction to RAP
2. Conceptualization
3. Visualization
4. Development, Transition, and Production
II. RAP Techniques
5. Business Event Analysis
6. Parallel Decomposition
7. User Task Analysis
8. Evolutionary Prototyping
A. RAP Work Breakdown Structure
B. RAP and Business Process Reengineering (BPR)
Glossary
Select Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Aiken.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Rating Scales and Checklists: Evaluating Behavior, Personality, and Attitudes
Author: Aiken, Lewis R.
Date: 1996
Pages: 320
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-12787-6
Contents:
Conceptual and Historical Background
Constructing and Scoring Rating Scales and Checklists
Item Analysis, Standardization, and Reliability
Validity and Statistical Methods for Research
Assessment in Business and Industry
Educational and Developmental Assessment
Personality and Clinical Assessment
Assessment of Attitudes and Values
Appendices

Bookmark: B.Anderson.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Architecture of Cognition
Author: Anderson, John R.
Date: 1996
Pages: 345
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80582233-X
Note: Reprint Edition
Contents:
1. Production Systems and ACT
2. Knowledge Representation
3. Spread of Activation
4. Control of Cognition
5. Memory for Facts
6. Procedural Learning
7. Language Acquisition

Bookmark: B.Isensee.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Art of Rapid Prototyping: User Interface Design for Windows and OS/2
Author: Isensee, Scott
Author: Rudd, James
Author: Heck, Michael
Date: 1996
Pages: 243
Publisher: International Thomson Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85032215-5
Contents:
Preface
1. What Is Rapid Prototyping?
2. Why Prototype?
3. The Rapid Prototyping Process
4. Secrets of Success
5. Tools for Rapid Prototyping
6. Prototyping Examples

Bookmark: B.Smilonich.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Cross-GUI Handbook: For Multiplatform User Interface Design
Author: Smilonich, Nick
Author: Thompson, Lynne
Author: Marcus, Aaron R.
Date: 1996
Pages: 276
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-57592-2
Contents:
1. Design Principles
2. Desktop
3. Windows
4. Menus
5. Controls
6. Dialog Boxes
7. Interaction and Feedback
A. Comparison of Windowing System Component Terminology
B. Comparison of Windowing System Components - Graphical Representations
Selected Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Stuart.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Design of Virtual Environments
Series Title: McGraw-Hill Series on Visual Technology
Author: Stuart, Rory
Date: 1996
Pages: 274
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07063299-5
Contents:
Introduction
1. Defining the User, Task, and Environment
2. Human Capabilities and Performance
3. Requirements for VE Applications
4. Input Technologies
5. Output Technologies
6. Computational and Supporting Technologies
7. Objects, Behaviors, and Interactions
8. Design Trade-Offs
9. System Performance
10. Usability
11. Value for Task and Application
12. Using the Results of the Evaluation
13. Conclusion
Appendix
Glossary
Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Galitz.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Essential Guide to User Interface Design: An Introduction to GUI Design Principles and Techniques
Author: Galitz, Wilbert O.
Date: 1996
Pages: 626
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-15755-4
Contents:
Preface
I. INTRODUCTION TO SCREEN DESIGN FOR THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE
1. The Importance of Good Screen Design
2. Characteristics of a Graphical User Interface
II. THE GUI SCREEN DESIGN PROCESS
Step 1. Know Your User or Client
Step 2. Understand the Business Function
Step 3. Understand the Principles of Good Screen Design
Step 4. Select the Proper Kinds of Windows
Step 5. Develop System Menus
Step 6. Select the Proper Device-Based Controls
Step 7. Choose the Proper Screen-Based Controls
Step 8. Organize and Lay Out Windows
Step 9. Choose the Proper Colors
Step 10. Create Meaningful Icons
Step 11. Provide Effective Messages, Feedback, Guidance, and Language Translation
Step 12. Test, Test, and Retest

Bookmark: B.Landauer.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Trouble With Computers: Usefulness, Usability, and Productivity
Author: Landauer, Thomas K.
Date: 1996
Pages: 440
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-62108-8 (paper) 0-262-12186-7 (cloth)
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Martin.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The User Interface Design Book for the Applications Programmer
Author: Martin, Alexander
Author: Eastman, David
Date: 1996
Pages: 316
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-95371-7
Contents:
How to find your way around this book
1. First Steps
1. Introduction to Design
2. How to Start the Design
3. Tools For the Job
4. The Design Specification
2. Designed to Use
1. Computer Literate versus The Rest
2. GUI versus Text
3. The Fundamentals of Input
4. WIMP and Controls
5. Context Switching
6. Graphics, Animation and Screen Presentation
7. Sound
8. Presenting Text
9. Being Intelligent
10. Learning Curve
11. Little Helpers
12. Documentation and Support Materials
3. Development Issues
1. Basic Program Structure
2. Program versus Data
3. Tools and Productivity
4. List Processing
Further Reading

Bookmark: B.Oravec.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Virtual Individuals, Virtual Groups: Human Dimensions of Groupware and Computer Networking
Series Title: Cambridge Series on Human-Computer Interaction, 11
Author: Oravec, Jo Ann
Date: 1996
Pages: 389
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-52145493-X
Contents:
Introduction
1. Evolution of computer application genres: Groupware and other network-based system applications
2. On the infinite variety of virtual entities
3. The shape of groups to come: Efforts to define, label, explain, and model collaborative activity
4. Shaped resources and spaces: Lessons from the use of desks, tables, whiteboards, office settings, and video
5. Cultural objects and technological dreams: Dependence, autonomy, and intellectual augmentation
6. Privacy, anonymity, and agency: Applications of computer networking and the development of social analogues
7. Toward a genre-responsive design approach for computing applications

Bookmark: B.Howlett.96
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Interface Design for Windows: Effective User Interfaces for Windows 95, Windows Nt, and Windows 3.1
Author: Howlett, Virginia
Date: 1996
Pages: 230
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-13419-8, OCLC 33898004
Contents:
Preface
1. An Introduction to Visual Interface Design
2. The Effects of Visual Impact
3. The Process for Designing Visual Interfaces
4. Developing a Visual Interface Design Strategy
5. Universal Design Principles
6. Graphic Information Design Principles
7. An Introduction to the Psychology of Perception
8. Affordances, Realism, and Dimensions
9. Design for the Screen
10. Color
11. Icons and Imagery
12. Fonts
13. Interface Makeovers
14. Great Windows Interfaces I Have Met
15. Common Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

Bookmark: B.Cooper.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: About Face: The Essentials of User Interface Design
Author: Cooper, Alan
Date: 1995
Pages: 580
City: Foster City, CA
Publisher: IDG Books
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56884-322-4, OCLC
Weblink: www.cooper.com/aboutface/about_about_face.html
Contents:
Foreword, by Andrew Singer
Acknowledgments and Dedication
Introduction
Part I. The Goal; Designing for Users
1: Goal-Directed Design
2: Software Design
3: The Three Models
4: Visual Interface Design
Part II. The Form; The March of Paradigms
5: Idioms and Affordances
6: An Irreverent History of Rectangles on the Screen
7: Windows-with-a-Small-w
8: Lord of the Files
9: Storage and Retrieval Systems
10: Choosing Platforms
Part III. The Behavior; The Program's Presentation of Self
11: Orchestration and Flow
12: Posture and State
13: Overhead and Idiocy
14: The Secret Weapon of Interface Design
Part IV. The Interaction; Pointing and Clicking
15: Elephants, Mice and Minnies
16: Selection
17: Direct Manipulation
18: Drag and Drop
Part V. The Cast; The Actors in the Drama
19: The Meaning Of Menus
20: Menus
21: Dialog Boxes
22: Dialog Box Etiquette
23: Toolbars
24: Roll the Credits, Please
Part VI. The Gizmos; Canned Visual Design
25: Imperative and Selection Gizmos
26: Entry and Display Gizmos
27: New Gizmos
Part VII. The Guardian; Protecting the User
28: The End of Errors
29: Managing Exceptions
30: Undo
Part VIII. The Teacher; Education on Demand
31: Good at What You Do
32: Installation, Configuration and Personalization
33: Shouldering the Burden
34: Where Do We Go from Here?
List of Axioms
Index

Bookmark: B.Cook.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Assistive Technologies: Principles and Practice
Author: Cook, Albert M.
Author: Hussey, Susan M.
Date: 1995
Pages: 712
Publisher: Mosby
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80161038-9
Contents:
Introduction and overview
A framework for assistive technologies
The disabled human user of assistive technologies
The assistive technology services to the consumer
Seating and positioning systems as extrinsic enablers for assistive technologies
Control interfaces for assistive technology
Computers as extrinsic enablers for assistive technologies
Electronic outputs for assistive technologies: visual displays, printers, auditory indicators, and voice synthesis
Augmentative and alternative communication systems
Technologies for personal mobility
Technologies that aid manipulation and control of the environment
Sensory aids for persons with visual, auditory, or tactile impairments

Bookmark: B.Andriole.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Cognitive Systems Engineering for User-Computer Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation: Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation
Author: Andriole, Stephen
Author: Adelman, Leonard
Date: 1995
Pages: 272
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80581244-X
Contents:
1. Cognitive Systems Engineering in Perspective
2. The Cognitive Bases of Design
3. Information Processing Technology for Cognitive Systems Engineering
4. Case Studies in Context
5. Displays and Interaction Routines for Enhanced Weapons Direction
6. Real-Time Expert System Interfaces, Cognitive Processes, and Task Performance
	+ Adelman, Leonard
	+ Cohen, Marvin S.
	+ Bresnick, Terry A.
	+ Chinnis, James O.
	+ Laskey, Kathryn B.
7. Information Order Effects on Expert Judgment
	+ Adelman, Leonard
	+ Bresnick, Terry A.
	+ Black, Paul K.
	+ Marvin, F. Freeman
	+ Sak, Steven G.
8. Cognitive Redesign of Submarine Displays
	+ Gerhardt-Powals, Jill
	+ Iavecchia, Helen
	+ Andriole, Stephen J.
	+ Miller, Ralph, III
9. Issues, Trends, and Opportunities

Bookmark: B.Kletz.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer Control and Human Error
Author: Kletz, Trevor A.
Date: 1995
Pages: 125
Publisher: Gulf Pub Co.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-88415269-3

Bookmark: B.Collins.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces
Series Title: Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series
Author: Collins, Dave
Date: 1995
Pages: 590
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80535350-X
Contents:
Preface
1. Introduction
I. FOUNDATIONS
2. Evolution of the OOUI
3. Two User Interface Styles
4. Applying Object-Orientation to User Interfaces
II. EXTERNAL DESIGN
5. Three Domains of OO Design for the User Interface
6. OOUI Design: Process and Team
7. Users, Tasks, and Task Analysis
8. The User's Conceptual Model
9. Information Presentation
10. Interaction and Control Mechanisms
III. INTERNAL DESIGN
11. Object-Oriented System Architectures
12. Information Models
13. Presentation and Interaction Objects
14. Tools for Prototyping and Implementation
15. Design Examples
16. Summary and Directions
Appendix 1: Fax Case Study
Appendix 2: Introduction to Object-Orientation
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Czaja.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Surveys: A Guide to Decisions and Procedures
Series Title: Research Methods and Statistics
Author: Czaja, Ronald
Author: Blair, Johnny
Date: 1995
Pages: 288
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8039-9056-1
Contents:
1. An Introduction to Surveys and to This Book
2. Stages of a Survey
3. Selecting the Method of Data Collection
4. Questionnaire Design: Writing the Questions
5. Questionnaire Design: Organizing the Questions
6. Questionnaire Design: Testing the Questions
7. Designing the Sample
8. Selecting a Sample
9. Reducing Sources of Error in Sampling and Data Collection
10. The Methodology Report
Appendixes
References
Glossary/Index

Bookmark: B.Mullet.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Visual Interfaces: Communication Oriented Techniques
Author: Mullet, Kevin
Author: Sano, Darrell
Date: 1995
Pages: 273
Publisher: Sunsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-303389-9
Contents:
Introduction
The Mess We're In
What Visual Designers Do
Art and Design
Functional vs. Aesthetic Concerns
Form, Function, and the Question of a Universal Aesthetic
Design and Rationality
Elegance and Simplicity
Principles
	Unity
	Refinement
	Fitness
Common Errors
	Clutter and Visual Noise
	Interference Between Competing Elements
	Using Explicit Structure as a Crutch
	Belaboring the Obvious
	Overly Literal Translation
	Excessive Detail and Embellishment
	Gratuitous Dimensionality
	All of the Above
Techniques
	Reducing a Design to Its Essence
	Regularizing the Elements of a Design
	Combining Elements for Maximum Leverage
Scale, Contrast, and Proportion
Background: Visual Variables
Principles
	Clarity
	Harmony
	Activity
	Restraint
Common Errors
	Insufficient Contrast
	Excessive Contrast
	Visual Interference
	Spatial Tension
	Overextension
	Awkward Dimensions
Techniques
	The Squint Test
	Establishing Perceptual Layers
	Sharpening Visual Distinctions
	Integrating Figure and Ground
Organization and Visual Structure
Background: Perceptual Organization
Principles
	Grouping
	Hierarchy
	Relationship
	Balance
Common Errors
	Haphazard Layout
	Conflicting Symmetries
	Ambiguous Internal Relationships
	Aligning Labels but not Controls
	Alignment Within but not Across Controls
	False Structure
	Excessive Display Density
	All of the Above
Techniques
	Using Symmetry to Ensure Balance
	Using Alignment to Establish Visual Relationships
	Optical Adjustment for Human Vision
	Shaping the Display with Negative Space
Module and Program
Background: Grid-Based Design
Principles
	Focus
	Flexibility
	Consistent Application
Common Errors
	Arbitrary Component Positions
	Arbitrary Component Dimensions
	Random Window Sizes and Layouts
	Unrelated Icon Sizes and Imagery
	Inconsistent Control Presentations
	Inconsistent Visual Language
Techniques
	Reinforcing Structure through Repetition
	Establishing Modular Units
	Creating Grid-Based Layout Programs
Image and Representation
Background: Semiotics
Principles
	Immediacy
	Generality
	Cohesiveness
	Characterization
	Communicability
Common Errors
	Misleading Syntax
	Poorly Integrated Structure
	Dominant Secondary Elements
	Using Type as Image
	Using Images for Abstract Concepts
	Images Based on Obscure Allusions
	Culture or Language Dependencies
	Offensive or Suggestive Imagery
Techniques
	Selecting the Right Vehicle
	Refinement through Progressive Abstraction
	Coordination to Ensure Visual Consistency
So What About Style?
Principles
	Distinctiveness
	Integrity
	Comprehensiveness
	Appropriateness
Common Errors
	Unwarranted Innovation
	Combining Unrelated Elements
	Partial Fulfillment
	Internal and External Inconsistency
	Incompatible Concepts
Techniques
	Mastering the Style
	Working Across Styles
	Extending and Evolving the Style
Conclusion
Further Information

Bookmark: B.Microsoft.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing International Software for Windows 95 and Windows NT
Author: Kano, Nadine
Author: Microsoft Corporation
Date: 1995
Pages: 743
City: Redmond, WA
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55615-840-8, OCLC
Weblink: www.microsoft.com/globaldev/dis_v1/disv1.asp
Contents:
Preface
1. Understanding Internationalization
2. Designing a Global Program
3. Encoding Character Sets
4. Preparing the User Interface for Localization
5. Supporting Local Conventions
6. Accommodating Multilingual I/O on Microsoft Windows
7. Processing Far Eastern Writing Systems
Appendix A: Glossary
Appendix B: Common Latin Diacritics and Ligatures
Appendix C: Selected International Punctuation Symbols
Appendix D: Sort Order for Selected Languages
Appendix E: Code-Page Support in Microsoft Windows
Appendix F: Locale-Specific Code-Page Information
Appendix G: DBCS/Unicode Mapping Tables
Appendix H: Code Pages
Appendix I: Microsoft Win32 Country-Specific and Language-Specific Information
Appendix J: Platform Support for the Win32 NLSAPI
Appendix K: Locale Support in Microsoft Windows
Appendix L: Multilingual API Functions and Structures
Appendix M: Font Signature Bit-Field Assignments
Appendix N: Windows 95 Input Method Manager API Functions
Appendix O: Windows 95 Input Method Manager API Messages and Parameters
Appendix P: Localized Editions of Microsoft Windows
Appendix Q: International Keyboard Layouts
Appendix R: Dead-Key Combinations on International Keyboard Layouts
Appendix S: Weights and Measures
Appendix T: International Currency, Date, and Time Formats
Appendix U: Paper and Envelope Types and Sizes
Appendix V: International Address Formats
Appendix W: Microsoft Subsidiaries
Additional Reading

Bookmark: B.Fernandez.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Global Interface Design: A Guide to Designing International User Interfaces
Series Title: Professional
Author: Fernandes, Tony
Date: 1995
Pages: 191
City: Boston
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-253790-4; QA 76.9.U83F47
Keywords: internationalization, globalization, localization, international user interfaces, cultural differences
Note: Includes CD-ROM
Contents:
1	Terminology
2	Globalization: Laying the Groundwork
3	National Language
4	Visual Language
5	National Formats
6	The Physical World
7	Introduction to Culture
8	Symbols and Taboos
9	Cultural Aesthetics
10	Usability Testing
11	Business Justification
A	Resources
B	Code
C	Multimedia

Bookmark: B.Redmond-Pyle.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Graphical User Interface Design and Evaluation: A Practical Process
Author: Redmond-Pyle, David
Author: Moore, Alan
Date: 1995
Pages: 291
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13315193-X
Keywords: GUIDE

Bookmark: B.Weinschenk.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Guidelines for Enterprise-Wide GUI Design
Author: Weinschenk, Susan
Author: Yeo, Sarah C.
Date: 1995
Pages: 222
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-11845-1 (book) 0-471-12633-0 (CD-ROM)
Contents:
Controls
Data Fields
Dialog Boxes and Windows
Menus
Messages
Color
Icons and Toolbars
Metaphors
Fonts
Visual Coding
Graphing
Navigation and Interaction
Online Help
Customization Guide
Appendices

Bookmark: B.MacAulay.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction for Software Designers
Series Title: Tutorial Gudies in Computing and Information Systems
Author: MacAulay, Linda
Date: 1995
Pages: 222
Publisher: International Thomson Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85032177-9
Contents:
Preface and acknowledgements
1. HCI and the software designer
2. Understanding user needs and requirements
3. Designing the user interface
4. Designing graphical user interfaces
5. Designing user interfaces to CSCW systems
6. Usability
7. HCI standards
Appendix A: Answers to exercises

Bookmark: B.Rada.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interactive Media
Author: Rada, Roy
Date: 1995
Pages: 242
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 0-38794485-0
Contents:
Preface
1. Introduction
2. Human-Computer Interaction
3. Hypertext
4. Multimedia
5. Hypermedia
6. Group and Groupware Principles
7. Groupware Applications
8. The Organization
9. Networks and their Applications
10. Organizational Case Studies
11. Conclusion
12. Exercises
13. Selected Abbreviations

Bookmark: B.Newman.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interactive System Design
Author: Newman, William M.
Author: Lamming, Michael G.
Date: 1995
Pages: 468
City: Wokingham, England
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-63162-8, OCLC 31971415
Weblink: www.rxrc.xerox.com/publis/isd/home.htm
Contents:
The Framework
1: Introduction
2: Defining the problem
3: The Human Virtual Machine
4: Design processes and representations
System design
5: User study methods
6: Systems analysis and design
7: Requirements definition
System evaluation
8: Usability analysis and inspection
9: Prototyping and evaluation
10: Experiments in support of design
Case Study A: Evaluation and analysis of a telephone operator's workstation
User interface design
11: User interface notations
12: Interaction styles
13: Conceptual design: The user's mental model
14: Conceptual design: Methods
15: Designing to guidelines
Case Study B: Designing a human memory aid

Bookmark: B.Kristof.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Interactivity By Design
Author: Kristof, Ray
Author: Satran, Amy
Date: 1995
Pages: 144
Publisher: Pearson Education
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56830221-5

Bookmark: B.Luong.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Internationalization Developing Software for Global Markets
Author: Luong, Tuoc V.
Author: Lok, James S. H.
Author: Lok, S. H.
Author: Driscoll, Kevin
Date: 1995
Pages: 293
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-07661-9
Contents:
Foreword
1. What Is Internationalization?
2. Components of Internationalization
3. Corporate Support for Internationalization
4. Internationalization and Development
5. Internationalization and Documentation
6. International Enabling Quality Assurance
7. Defining a Locale
8. Localization Decisions
9. Localization Enabling
10. Managing Localization
11. Performing Localization
12. European Localization QA
13. Asian Localization
14. Asian QA
Appendix A: International Tables
Appendix B: International Date Formats
Appendix C: Internationalizing Microsoft Windows 3.X Applications
Appendix D: International Functional Requirements Document (IFRD)
Appendix E: Sample Locale
Appendix F: Sample Character Map

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Multimedia and Hypertext: The Internet and Beyond
Series Title: Professional
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Date: 1995
Pages: 480
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12518408-5
Weblink: www.useit.com/jakob/mmhtbook.html
Contents:
Preface
1. Defining Hypertext, Hypermedia, and Multimedia
2. An Example of a Hypertext System
3. The History of Hypertext
4. Applications of Hypertext
5. The Architecture of Hypertext Systems
6. Hardware Support for Hypertext
7. Hypertext on the Internet
8. Coping with Information Overload
9. Navigating Large Information Spaces
10. Hypertext Usability
11. Multimedia Authoring
12. Repurposing Existing Content
13. The Future of Multimedia and Hypertext
Appendix: Annotated Bibliography

Bookmark: B.Zetie.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Practical User Interface Design: Making GUIs Work
Author: Zetie, Carl
Date: 1995
Pages: 251
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07709167-1
Note: Includes Disk
Contents:
Introduction
1. Fundamental principles
2. Conceptual models
3. Taskflow
4. Dialog design
5. Detailed design
6. Errors and help
A. Choosing a design tool
B. The demonstration disk
References and further reading

Bookmark: B.Kress.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design
Author: Kress, Gunther R.
Author: Van Leeuwen, Theo
Author: Gress, Gunther R.
Date: 1995
Pages: 288
Publisher: Routledge
Standard number: ISBN: 0-41510600-1 (pbk) 0-41510599-4 (hdbk)

Bookmark: B.Ray.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Technology, Computers, and the Special Needs Learner
Author: Ray, John R.
Author: Warden, M. Kathleen
Author: Warden, Kathleen
Date: 1995
Pages: 240
Publisher: Delmar Pub
Standard number: ISBN: 0-82736476-8

Bookmark: B.Fink.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Survey Handbook (The Survey Kit, Vol 1)
Author: Fink, Arlene
Author: Fielder, Eve P.
Author: Frey, James H.
Date: 1995
Pages: 128
Publisher: Sage Publicaitions
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8039-5934-6

Bookmark: B.Microsoft.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Windows Interface Guidelines for Software Design
Author: Trower, Tandy
Author: Microsoft Corporation
Date: 1995
Pages: 556
City: Redmond, WA
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55615-679-0; OCLC 32590068
Contents:
Introduction
PT. I. FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGNING USER INTERACTION
Ch. 1. Principles and Methodology
Ch. 2. Basic Concepts
Ch. 3. The Windows Environment
Ch. 4. Input Basics
Ch. 5. General Interaction Techniques
PT. II. WINDOWS INTERFACE COMPONENTS
Ch. 6. Windows
Ch. 7. Menus, Controls, and Toolbars
Ch. 8. Secondary Windows
PT. III. DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS AND GUIDELINES
Ch. 9. Window Management
Ch. 10. Integrating with the System
Ch. 11. Working with OLE Embedded and OLE Linked Objects
Ch. 12. User Assistance
Ch. 13. Visual Design
Ch. 14. Special Design Considerations
IV. APPENDIXES
Appendix A Mouse Interface Summary
Appendix B Keyboard Interface Summary
Appendix C Guidelines Summary
Appendix D Supporting Specific Versions of Microsoft Windows
Appendix E International Word Lists
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Tognazzini.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Tog on Software Design
Author: Tognazzini, Bruce
Date: 1995
Pages: 407
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-48917-1, OCLC
Contents:
Introduction
1. Trends
2. Future Computing
3. Managing the Future
4. From Quality to Kansei
5. Starfire Applied
6. Understanding Users
7. A Garden of Design
8. Beyond the Horizon
Appendix A: Behind the Scenarios
Appendix B: Designing With Video Prototypes

Bookmark: B.Winograd.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Understanding Computers and Cognition: A New Foundation for Design
Author: Winograd, Terry
Author: Flores, Fernando
Date: 1995
Pages: 207
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-11297-3
Note: Reissue Edition

Bookmark: B.Varhol.95
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-centered application design with Visual Basic
Author: Varhol, Peter
Date: 1995
Pages: 325
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-11522-3

Bookmark: B.Jackson.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer Generated Colour: A Practical Guide to Presentation and Display
Author: Jackson, Richard
Author: MacDonald, Lindsay
Author: Freeman, Ken
Date: 1994
Pages: 256
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-93378-3
Contents:
Light and Vision
Colour Response and Modelling
Colour Displays
Generating the Image
Designing Coloured Text
Colour in Graphics and Visualization
From Display to Print
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Dillon.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Usable Electronic Text: Ergonomic Aspects of Human Information Usage
Author: Dillon, Andrew
Date: 1994
Pages: 220
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7484-0113-X (paper) 0-7484-0112-1 (cloth)

Bookmark: B.Horton.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing and Writing Online Documentation: Hypermedia for Self-Supporting Products
Series Title: Wiley Technical Communication Library
Author: Horton, William K.
Date: 1994
Pages: 464
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-30635-5
Contents:
1. Going Online
The Deluge ... and the Trickle
What Is Online Documentation?
Should Your Document Go Online?
Myths About Online Documentation
Types of Online Documentation
2. Planning
Develop Documents Systematically
Learn Who Uses the Product and Why
Set Clear Objectives
Observe What Questions Users Ask
Use State-Of-The-Art Peopleware
Select Software Carefully
Wean Users from Paper Documents
Convert Or Redesign?
Design for Efficient Production
3. Access
Access Uber Alles
Automatic Access
Semiautomatic Access
Manual Access
Combining Access Strategies
Improving Context Sensitivity
Improving Search Systems
4. Topics
What Are Topics?
Why Discrete Topics?
How to Create a Good Topic
Chunking Strategies
What Goes Into a Topic?
5. Links
Why Create Links?
Links in Paper Documents
Scope of Links
Direction of Links
Actions Triggered by Links
Transitions Introduce the Destination
Link Triggers
Define Specific Types of Links
Ways of Creating Links
Before You Link...
6. Organization
Standard Organizational Structures
What Organization Is Best?
Organize to Meet Users' Needs
Layer Documents
Avoid Common Organizational Problems
Engineer a Reading Sequence
Standardize Common Topic Clusters
7. Dialog
Engineer Effective Dialogs
Let Users Do More Than Read
Use Familiar Metaphors
Answer Questions Quickly
The "Lost in Hyperspace" Problem
Maps in Online Documents
Touchscreen-Kiosk Design
8. Display
A Screen Is Not a Page
Design Screens Methodically
Decide Where Documents Appear
Do Not Pack Information Too Tightly
Arrange the Display Logically
Use Color to Communicate
Make Text Legible
Size Type for Prominence and Legibility
Emphasize Scanning Targets
9. Words
Use Short, Simple, Familiar Words
Ensure Accurate Reading
Speak Simply, Directly, and Accurately
Apply a Consistent Style Throughout
Assume Nonsequential Scanning
Write Globally
Indexing Large Documents
10. Pictures
Use Pictures to Show Rather Than Tell
Include Graphics in All Documents
Design for the Screen, Not Paper
Keep Pictures Simple
Handle Large Graphics With Care
Electronically Link Text and Graphics
11. New Media
Onward to Multimedia
Sound
Music
Voice
Interactive Pictures
Visual Transitions
Mixing Media
12. Help
What Is Help?
Types of Help Facilities
Make It Easy to Get Help
Include Information the User Needs
Fit Smoothly Into the User's Work Flow
Integrate Help With Other Documents
13. Computer-Based Training
Where to Use Computer-Based Training
Types of Computer-Based Training
Learn from Learning Theory
Design Complete Learning Programs
Provide Helpful Feedback
Share Control With the Learner
Design Standard Lesson Sequences
14. The Future
Barriers Remain
More Study Is Needed
Authoring Will Never Be the Same
Will Online Documents Replace Paper?
Out of the Old Invent the New

Bookmark: B.Liungman.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Dictionary of Symbols
Author: Liungman, Carl G.
Date: 1994
Pages: 596
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-39331236-4
Keywords: icons graphics
Note: Reprint Edition

Bookmark: B.Rubin.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Handbook of Usability Testing: How to Plan, Design, and Conduct Effective Tests
Author: Rubin, Jeffrey
Date: 1994
Pages: 330
City: New York
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-59403-2, OCLC
Contents:
I. INTRODUCTION TO USABILITY TESTING
1. The Problem of Unusable Products and Systems
2. Overview of Usability Testing
II. PREPARING FOR USABILITY TESTING
3. Setting Up a Testing Environment
4. Testing Roles with Special Emphasis on the Test Monitor
III. SIX STAGES OF CONDUCTING A TEST
5. Developing the Test Plan
6. Selecting and Acquiring Participants
7. Preparing the Test Materials
8. Conducting the Test
9. Debriefing the Participant
10. Transforming Data into Findings and Recommendations
IV. EXPANDING USABILITY
11. Establishing a Usability Program: Strategies and Tactics

Bookmark: B.Salant.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: How to Conduct Your Own Survey
Author: Salant, Priscilla
Author: Dillman, Don A.
Date: 1994
Pages: 232
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-01273-4
Contents:
Practical Surveys
Cornerstones of a Quality Survey
Deciding What Information You Need
Choosing a Survey Method
When and How to Select a Sample
Writing Good Questions
Questionnaire Design
Setting Your Survey in Motion and Getting It Done
From Questionnaires to Survey Results
Reporting Survey Results
Advice, Resources, and Maintaining Perspective
Absract: "Leading professionals give you proven techniques for getting reliable results * Accurate sampling * Effective questionnaires * Convincing presentations * Telephone, mail, and face-to-face surveys" (from the book cover)

Bookmark: B.Proctor.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Simple and Complex Systems
Author: Proctor, Robert W.
Author: Van Zandt, Trisha
Date: 1994
Pages: 550
City: Boston, MA
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
Standard number: ISBN: 0-205-13999-X; OCLC 27814490
Contents:
Foreword
1. FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN FACTORS
1. Historical Foundations of Human Factors
2. Research Methods in Human Factors
3. Reliability and Human Error in Systems
4. Human Information Processing
2. PERCEPTUAL FACTORS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
5. Sensory Input
6. Perception of Basic Properties
7. Perception of Objects in the World
8. The Display of Visual, Auditory, and Tactile Information
3. COGNITIVE FACTORS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
9. Attention and the Assessment of Mental Workload
10. Retention and Comprehension of Information
11. Solving Problems and Making Decisions
12. Experts and Expert Systems
4. MOVEMENT FACTORS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
13. Response Selection and Principles of Compatibility
14. Control of Movement
15. The Acquisition of Motor Skill
16. Controls and Controlling Actions
5. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
17. Anthropometrics and Workspace Design
18. The Physical Environment
19. Human Resource Management
20. Human-Computer Interaction
21. The Practice of Human Factors
Appendix 1 Areas under the Standard Normal Curve from the z to Infinity
Appendix 2 Values of log{sub:2}n and -p log{sub:2}p
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Preece.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Preece, Jenny
Author: Rogers, Yvonne
Author: Sharp, Helen
Author: Benyon, David
Author: Holland, Simon
Author: Carey, Tom
Date: 1994
Pages: 773
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-62769-8, OCLC 35598754
Weblink: Review from SIGCHI Bulletin
Contents:
I. INTRODUCTION (1)
1.	What is HCI? (3)
2.	Components of HCI (29)
Interview with Terry Winograd (53)
II. HUMANS AND TECHNOLOGY: HUMANS (55)
Interview with Donald Norman (59)
3. Cognitive Frameworks for HCI (61)
4. Perception and Representation (75)
5. Attention and Memory Constraints (99)
6. Knowledge and Mental Models (123)
7. Interface Metaphors and Conceptual Models (141)
8. Learning in Context (155)
9. Social Aspects (173)
10. Organizational Aspects (185)
Interview with Marilyn Mantei (201)
III. HUMANS AND TECHNOLOGY: TECHNOLOGY (203)
Interview with Ben Shneiderman (207)
11. Input (211)
12. Output (237)
13. Interaction Styles (261)
14. Designing Window Systems (285)
15. User Support and On-Line Information (307)
16. Designing for Collaborative Work and Virtual Environments (325)
Interview with Roy Kalawsky (343)
IV. INTERACTION DESIGN: METHODS AND TECHNIQUES (345)
Interview with Tom Moran (349)
17. Principles of User-Centred Design (351)
18. Methods for User-Centred Design (371)
19. Requirements Gathering (383)
20. Task Analysis (409)
21. Structured HCI Design (431)
22. Envisioning Design (451)
V. INTERACTION DESIGN: SUPPORT FOR DESIGNERS (465)
Interview with Bill Verplank (467)
23. Supporting Design (469)
24. Guidelines: Principles and Rules (487)
25. Standards and Metrics (501)
26. Design Rationale (523)
27. Prototyping (537)
28. Software Support (565)
Interview with Deborah Hix (593)
VI. INTERACTION DESIGN: EVALUATION (595)
Interview with Brian Shackel (599)
29. The Role of Evaluation (601)
30. Usage Data: Observations, Monitoring, Users' Opinions (615)
31. Experiments and Benchmarking (641)
32. Interpretive Evaluation (657)
33. Predictive Evaluation (671)
34. Comparing Methods (691)
Glossary (709)
Solutions to Questions (725)
References (745)
Index (761)

Bookmark: B.Galitz.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: It's Time to Clean Your Windows: Designing GUIs That Work
Author: Galitz, Wilbert O.
Date: 1994
Pages: 477
Publisher: Q. E. D. Information Sciences Inc.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-47160668-5; 0-89435469-8
Contents:
Foreword
Preface
1. Introduction
2. Characteristics of the Graphical User Interface
3. Principles of Graphical User Interface Design
4. The Graphical User Interface Screen Design Process - Overview
5. User Considerations
6. General Screen Design Considerations
7. Application Considerations
8. Windows
9. Menus
10. Device-Based Controls
11. Screen-Based Controls
12. Organizing and Layout Out Windows
13. Color
14. Icons
15. Other Screen Design Considerations
16. Testing

Bookmark: B.Weiss.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Making Computers People-Literate
Series Title: The Jossey-Bass Management
Author: Weiss, Elaine
Date: 1994
Pages: 281
Publisher: Jossey-Bass Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55542622-0
Contents:
1. How the Interface Between User and Computer Affects Performance
1. What Makes Systems Easy to Learn and Easy to Use
2. Techniques for Improving Interactions Between People and Computers
2. Finding the Source of Performance Problems
3. The Presentation Interface: Improving the Visual Display of Information
4. The Conversation Interface: Improving the Visual of Information
5. The Navigation Interface: Making It Easy for Users to Get Around in the System
6. The Explanation Interface: Incorporating Features That Help Users Learn About the System
7. Ensuring Successful Implementation of Solutions
3. Techniques in Action
8. When Training Stops Working: Case Study of First Atlantic Bank
4. Resources
A. User Satisfaction Survey
B. Evaluation Task Selection Worksheet
C. Presentation Interface Checklists
D. Conversation Interface Checklists
E. Navigation Interface Checklists
F. Explanation Interface Checklists
G. Glossary

Bookmark: B.Hackos.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Managing Your Documentation Projects
Series Title: Wiley Technical Communication Library
Author: Hackos, JoAnn T.
Date: 1994
Pages: 656
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-59099-1
Contents:
1. Managing for Quality - An Introduction to Publications Project Management
1. Managing for Quality - A Process Model
2. A Model of the Publications-Development Life Cycle
3. A Process-Maturity Model for Publications Organizations
4. The Roles of the Project Manager
2. Starting the Project - The Information-Planning Phase
5. Starting Projects on Time
6. Defining the Need for Information
7. Creating the Information Plan
8. Creating the Project Plan
9. Managing the Phase 1 Review Process
3. Establishing the Specifics - The Content-Specification Phase
10. Creating the Content Specifications
11. Revising the Project Plan
12. Creating a Tracking System
13. Creating Project Standards
14. Conducting the Content-Specification Reviews
4. Keeping the Project Running - The Implementation Phase
15. Managing Phase 3: Implementation Activities
16. Keeping the Project Operating Smoothly
17. Tracking Progress
18. Managing Change
19. Developing Prototypes
20. Introducing Usability Assessment
21. Anticipating Changes in the Development Life Cycle
5. Managing the Production Phase
22. Managing Production Activities
23. Managing Indexing
24. Scheduling Copyediting
25. Managing the Translation and Localization Process
6. Ending the Project - The Evaluation Phase
26. Evaluating the Publications Project
27. Evaluating the Publications Process
28. Evaluating the Publications Team
29. Preparing for the Project's Future
Appendix A Information-Plan Template
Appendix B Audience-Analysis Checklist
Appendix C Environment-Analysis Checklist
Appendix D Content-Specifications Template
Appendix E Project Wrap-Up Report

Bookmark: B.Fisher.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Multimedia Authoring: Building and Developing Documents
Series Title: Professional
Author: Fisher, Scott
Date: 1994
Pages: 286
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12257560-1 0-12784811-8 (pbk)
Contents:
Introduction: Learning to Think Multimedia
The Restrictions of Linearity
Interactive Documents before Multimedia: Hypertext
Goals of This Book
Terminology Used in This Book
Applicability: Who Needs Multimedia?
Is There Anything Multimedia Can't Do?
What Makes Multimedia Special?
Making Music: How Many Tunes from Only 88 Keys?
The Author as Composer
Pace, Volume, and Tempo
Storyboards: Visual Outlines
Storyboard History
How Do You Start?
Storyboarding for Interactive Media
Different Kinds of Stories, Different Kinds of Boards
Components: Modules and Links
What Is a Module?
What Is a Link?
Restrictions of Tools and Media
How the Brain Retains Information
Moving Modules
In Our Last Episode...
Open-Ended Links
Structure: Analyzing the Information in Your Database
What Is an Information Database?
What Comes First?
Profiling User Information
The Nature of the Information Database
Information Hierarchies
Flat Versus Structured Information Layout
Assumptions: Right Ones and Wrong Ones
The Myth of Prerequisite Information
Is There Such a Thing as a Valid Assumption?
How Information Is Used
Building Assumptions into the Document
In the Audience's Shoes
Preparing Paper and Online Documents from Common Source
Road Maps: How To Get Around In Cyberspace
What is Cyberspace, Anyway?
Orienting the Reader: The Table of Contents
Directory Listings
"You Are Here"
Is That All There Is?
Guided Interactive Navigation
Document Structure: Islands and Streams
Document Conversion Versus Document Creation
From Text to Hypertext
From Hypertext to Hypermedia
Advantages of Conversion
Advantages of Modular Design
Creating or Adapting - Common Needs
Adapting an Existing Document
Creating a New Document
Multimedia Projects: Checklists, Issues, and Questions
Integrating System Components
Using the Checklists
Checklist - Document Analysis
Checklist - Roles of Development Staff
Checklist - Authoring System Analysis
Checklist - Delivery System Analysis
Checklist - Understanding your Resources
Timeline - Project Overview
Conclusion - New Technology, New Information, New Aesthetics
Appendix A - Online Examples
Appendix B - Glossary
Appendix C - Bibliography

Bookmark: B.ODonnell.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Programming for the World: A guide to Internationalization
Author: O'Donnell, Sandra Martin
Date: 1994
Pages: 440
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: PTR Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-722190-8
Keywords: software localization; internationalization; globalization
Contents:
1. Introducing the World
2. A World of Differences
3. Designing for the World
4. Encoding Characters
5. Locales
6. Supporting Multiple Encodings
7. Input and Output
8. Processing International Data
9. Program Messages
10. What Doesn't Change
11. Documenting the World
12. Multilingual and Distributed Computing
Appendix A: Defining a Locale
Appendix B: Input Methods
Appendix C: For More Information
Appendix D: Acronyms
Appendix E: Standard Control Characters

Bookmark: B.Browne.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: STUDIO: STructured User-interface Design for Interaction Optimization
Author: Browne, Dermot P.
Date: 1994
Pages: 291
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-014721-4
Contents:
I. Introduction
	I.1. User interface design: the issue of the 1990s?
	I.2. STUDIO
	I.3. User interface development and the software life cycle
	I.4. Case study
	I.5. Structure of this book
	I.6. Summary
1. Project proposing and planning (Stage 1)
	1.1. Cost-benefit analysis (Step 101)
	1.2. Quality planning (Step 102)
2. User requirements analysis (Stage 2)
	2.1. Preparing the groundwork (Step 201)
	2.2. Evidence collection (Step 202)
	2.3. Task analysis (Step 203)
	2.4. Validation (Step 204)
	2.5. Reporting of findings (Step 205)
3. Task synthesis (Stage 3)
	3.1. Task synthesis (Step 301)
	3.2. Style guide (Step 302)
	3.3. Design specification (Step 303)
	3.4. User support (Step 304)
	3.5. Formative evaluation (Step 305)
4. Usability engineering (Stage 4)
	4.1. Usability engineering planning (Step 401)
	4.2. Prototype build (Step 402)
	4.3. Design audit (Step 403)
	4.4. Prepare evaluation materials (Step 404)
	4.5. Prototype Evaluation (Step 405)
	4.6. Impact analysis (Step 406)
	4.7. Update specifications (Step 407)
5. User interface development (Stage 5)
	5.1. Hand over specification (Step 501)
	5.2. Integration/interfacing (Step 502)
	5.3. Acceptance testing (Step 503)
	5.4. Termination reporting (Step 504)
6. Conclusion
Appendix A: Documents produced
Appendix B: Quick reference guide
Appendix C: Testing/auditing
Appendix D: Standards organisations
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Minasi.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Secrets of Effective GUI Design
Author: Minasi, Mark
Date: 1994
Pages: 225
Publisher: SYBEX
Standard number: ISBN: 0-78211495-4

Bookmark: B.Bauersfeld.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software by Design: Creating People Friendly Software for the MacIntosh
Series Title: New Technology Building Blocks
Author: Bauersfeld, Penny
Date: 1994
Pages: 329
Publisher: M&T Books
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55828296-3

Bookmark: B.Salzman.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software by Design: Shaping Technology and the Workplace
Author: Salzman, Harold
Author: Rosenthal, Stephen R.
Date: 1994
Pages: 348
Publisher: Oxford Univ Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-19508340-7
Contents:
I. Structuring Technology and The Workplace
Introduction
1. Social Shaping of Technology
2. Software in the Workplace
3. The Structure of Software Design
II. Case Studies of Software Design
4. Banking and a Tale of Two Systems
5. Keeping the Customer Satisfied: Field Service and the Art of Automation
6. The Computer System and the Hospital
7. Software Design, Social Choices, and the Workplace
III. Implications for Management and for Further Research on Technology Design
8. Understanding and Managing Software Acquisition
9. Social Dimensions of Software Design: Challenges of Effective Design for the Workplace
A: Outline of the Research Project
B: Teaching Cases on Software Design and Use

Bookmark: B.Cleveland.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Graphing Data
Author: Cleveland, William S.
Date: 1994
Pages: 297
Publisher: Hobart Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96348841-4
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical Graph Construction Graphical Methods Graphical Perception
Note: Revised Edition

Bookmark: B.Horton.94b
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Icon Book: Visual Symbols for Computer Systems and Documentation
Author: Horton, William K.
Date: 1994
Pages: 432
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-59901-8, OCLC 28962614
Note: Book and Disk
Contents:
Icons in Perspective
How Icons Work
Representing Ideas Graphically
Showing Relationships
Designing an Iconic Language
Drawing Icons
Color in Icons
Standard Parts of the Icon
Icons for Specific Purposes
Icons for International Products
Managing Development
Testing Icons
Editing Icons
Forms, Formulas, and Checklists
Case Study in Icon Design
Icon Starter Set

Bookmark: B.VanSomeren
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Think Aloud Method: A Practical Guide to Modelling Cognitive Processes (Knowledge-Based Systems)
Author: Van Someren, Maarten W.
Author: Barnard, Yvonne F.
Author: Sandberg, Jacobijn
Date: 1994
Pages: 208
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12714270-3
Contents:
1. Thinking aloud
2. Studying the content of cognitive processes
3. The think aloud method
4. Practical procedures in obtaining think aloud protocols
5. Building models of problem-solving
6. Languages for task analysis and psychological modelling
7. Analysing the protocols
8. Examples
A: Exercises
B: Instructions for two problem-solving tasks
C: Protocols of 'learning word meanings'
D: Analysing expert problem-solving
E: Coding scheme architectural design
F: Protocol of novice problem-solving in physics

Bookmark: B.Lansdale.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Understanding Interfaces: A Handbook of Human-Computer Dialogue
Series Title: Computer and People Series
Author: Lansdale, Mark W.
Author: Ormerod, Thomas C.
Date: 1994
Pages: 289
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-528390-3
Contents:
1. INTERFACES IN CONTEXT
1. The context of interface use
2. UNDERSTANDING DIALOGUE
2. Fitting dialogues to the task
3. Fitting dialogues to the medium
4. The structure of dialogues
5. Maintaining dialogues
3. UNDERSTANDING USER SKILLS
6. Skill as procedures
7. Skill as understanding
8. Skill as exploration
4. UNDERSTANDING INTERFACE DESIGN
9. Designing interfaces
10. Evaluating interfaces

Bookmark: B.Lindgaard.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability Testing and System Evaluation: A Guide for Designing Useful Computing Systems
Series Title: Chapman & Hall Computing
Author: Lindgaard, Gitte
Date: 1994
Pages: 393
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-41246100-5

Bookmark: B.Eberts.94
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Design
Author: Eberts, Ray E.
Date: 1994
Pages: 649
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-140328-1
Contents:
I - INTRODUCTION
1. Interacting with Computers
2. Interface Widgets
3. Four Approaches to Human-Computer Interaction
II - EMPIRICAL APPROACH
4. Experimental Methodology
5. Experimental Design and Analysis
6. Hazards to Conducting and Interpreting HCI Experiments
III - COGNITIVE APPROACH
7. Mental Models
8. Human Information Processing
9. Neural Network Models
10. Metaphors and Analogies
11. Spatial Reasoning and Graphics
12. Workload Assessment
IV - PREDICTIVE MODELING APPROACH
13. The Model Human Processor
14. GOMS
15. NGOMSL
16. Production Systems
17. Grammar Representations
V - ANTHROPOMORPHIC APPROACH
18. Human-Human Communication
19. Natural Interface Design: Alternative Input Methods
20. Natural Interface Design: Perceptual and Cognitive Mismatches
21. Affordances, Constraints and World Knowledge
VI - ISSUES IN HCI (APPLICATION OF APPROACHES)
22. Feedback and Help Messages
23. Menu Displays
24. Database Applications
25. Groupware
References
Author Index
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Cleveland.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visualizing Data
Author: Cleveland, William S.
Date: 1994
Pages: 360
Publisher: Hobart Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96348840-6

Bookmark: B.Dumas.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Practical Guide to Usability Testing
Author: Dumas, Joseph S.
Author: Redish, Janice C.
Date: 1993
Pages: 412
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-990-X (cloth); 0-89391-991-8 (paper)
Contents:
I. CONCERNING USABILITY (1)
1 Introducing Usability (3)
2 Introducing Usability Testing (21)
3 Uncovering Usability Needs Before You Design (39)
4 Basing Designs on Expertise in Human-Computer Interaction (51)
5 Evaluating Usability Throughout Design and Development (63)
6 Establishing a Usability Program in Your Organization (83)
II. PLANNING AND PREPARING FOR A USABILITY TEST (97)
7 Planning a Usability Test (99)
8 Defining Goals and Concerns (109)
9 Deciding who Should be Participants (119)
10 Recruiting Participants (135)
11 Selecting and Organizing Tasks to Test (159)
12 Creating Task Scenarios (171)
13 Deciding How to Measure Usability (183)
14 Preparing Test Materials (203)
15 Preparing the Test Environment (221)
16 Preparing the Test Team (233)
17 Conducting a Pilot Test (263)
III. CONDUCTING AND USING THE RESULTS OF A USABILITY TEST (271)
18 Caring for the Test Participants (273)
19 Conducting the Test (287)
20 Tabulating and Analyzing Data (309)
21 Recommending Changes (331)
22 Communicating the Results (339)
23 Preparing a Highlight Tape (355)
24 Changing the Product and the Process (367)
References (375)
Appendix A: Setting Up a Usability Lab (383)
Appendix B: Relevant Organizations and Journals (397)
Author Index (407)
Subject Index (409)

Bookmark: B.Nardi.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Small Matter of Programming: Perspectives on End User Computing
Author: Nardi, Bonnie A.
Date: 1993
Pages: 184 + 16 illus.
City: Cambridge, Massachusetts
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-14053-5 NARSH
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Conversation and Computers
3. Task-specific Programming Languages
4. Interaction Techniques for End User Application Development
5. Application Frameworks
6. Collaborative Work Practices
7. Scenarios of End User Programming
Absract: A SMALL MATTER OF PROGRAMMING asks why it has been so difficult for end users to command programming power and explores the problems of end user-driven application development that must be solved to afford end users greater computational power. Drawing on empirical research on existing end user systems, A SMALL MATTER OF PROGRAMMING analyzes cognitive, social, and technical issues of end user programming. In particular, it examines the importance of task-specific programming languages, visual application frameworks, and collaborative work practices for end user computing, with the goal of helping designers and programmers understand and better satisfy the needs of end users who want the capability to create, customize, and extend their applications software. The ideas in the book are based on the author's research on two successful end user programming systems -- spreadsheets and CAD systems -- as well as other empirical research. Nardi concentrates on broad issues in end user programming, especially end users' strengths and problems, introducing tools and techniques as they are related to higher-level user issues.

Bookmark: B.Lazzaro.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Adaptive Technologies for Learning and Work Environments
Author: Lazzaro, Joseph J.
Date: 1993
Pages: 251
Publisher: The American Library Association 50 East Huron Street Chicago, IL 60611 Phone: 312-280-5108, 800-545-2433
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8389-0615-x
Contents:
Figures
Preface
Introduction
1 Breaking Barriers with Adaptive Technology
Blindness and Visual Impairment
Deafness and Hearing Impairment
Motor and/or Speech Impairment
The Americans with Disabilities Act
Conclusion
2 The Personal Computer
From Abacus to Apple
Computer Hardware
Software
Personal Computer Manufacturers
Selecting a Personal Computer
3  Technology for Persons with Vision Impairments
Speech Synthesis
Magnification Systems
Braille Systems
Optical Character Recognition Systems
Products for Persons with Vision Impairments
4  Technology for Persons with Hearing Impairments
Text Telephones
Facsimile Communication
Computer-Assisted Access
Signaling Systems
Captioning Systems
Electronic Amplification Systems
Products for Persons Who Are Deaf or Hearing Impaired
5 Technology for Persons with Motor and/or Speech Impairments
Adapted Keyboards
Keyboard Modification Software
Alternative Input Systems
Voice Recognition Systems
Alternative Communications Devices
Environmental Control Systems
Products for Persons with Motor and/or Speech Impairments
6 Applications for Adaptive Technology
Local Area Networks
The Online World
Compact Disks
Telecommunications Services and CD-ROM Products
7 Rehabilitation Engineering and Training
Rehabilitation Engineering
Training
Technical Support
8 Funding Adaptive Technology
Cost-Savings Ideas
Personal Funding Sources
Government-Sponsored Funding Sources
Private-Sector Funding Sources
Financial Aid Resources
Appendixes
A    Organizational Resources for Persons with Disabilities
B    Assistive Technology Conferences
C    Journals and Newsletters on Assistive Technology
D    Technology Assistance States
Index
Figures
1 Personal Computer Checklist
2 Rehabilitation Engineering Checklist

Bookmark: B.HP.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Common Desktop Environment: Functional Specification
Author: Hewlett-Packard
Author: IBM
Author: Sunsoft Inc.
Author: USL
Date: 1993
Number of Chapters: X/Open document no: S306
Pages: 79
Publisher: X/Open Company Ltd.
Standard number: ISBN: 1-85912-001-6
Keywords: X/Open Style Guidelines
Note: Preliminary Draft
Weblink: XOPEN.CO.UK/pub/cdespec1/cde1_ps.Z

Bookmark: B.Apple.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Demystifying Multimedia: A Guide for Multimedia Developers
Author: Apple Computer, Inc.
Date: 1993
Pages: 288
City: San Francisco, CA
Publisher: Apple Computer, Inc. and vivid publishing, inc.
Contents:
Introduction
	Multimedia Defined
	Different Markets and Different Processes
	Multimedia Industry Participants
	Why This Book?
	A Call to Arms
1: Prototypical Roles
	Audience
	Clients
	Business and Legal Professionals
	Project Managers
	Marketing and Sales Managers
	Content Experts
	Writers, Editors, and Researchers
	Graphics Professionals
	Sound Professionals
	Animators
	Video Professionals
	Information Designers, Interface Designers, and Programmers
2: Prototypical Projects
	Electronic Books
	Electronic Magazines
	Kiosks
	Multimedia Databases
	Corporate Training
	Interactive Education
	Interactive Games
	Interactive Music
	Interactive Art and Performance
	Interactive Sales and Marketing
	Presentation and Communications
	Productivity and Authoring Tools
3: Management
	Business Management
	Project Management
	Finances
	People
	Resources
	Legal Concerns
	Working with Clients
	Marketing and Sales
	Management Tips
4: Concept and Planning
	Project Types
	Development Process
	Interactivity
	Target Audience
	Designing for Reuse
	Content Experts
	Content
	Comparing Media
	Combining Media
	Legal Issues
	Market Research
	Early Visualization
	Concept and Planning Tips
5: Design and Prototype
	Kickoff Meeting
	Working Content
	Design Goals
	Brainstorming
	Information Design
	Interface Design
	Group Interactions
	Storyboards
	Prototype
	Tools and Engines
	Text
	Graphics, Illustrations, and Photographs
	Time-based Media
	Sound
	Animation
	Video
	Integration
	Programming
	User Testing
	Product Specifications and Standards
	Design and Prototyping Tips
6: Production
	Production Methods
	Organizing the Production Schedule
	Organizing the Production Personnel
	Organizing the Production Resources
	Repurposing Source Materials
	Generating New Content
	Text Production
	Graphic Production
	Sound Production
	Animation Production
	Video Production
	Programming Production
	Production Integration
	Documentation
	Product Packaging
	Production Tips
7: Testing
	Multimedia Testing Issues
	When to Test
	When to Stop Testing
	What to Test
	User Testing
	Functional Testing
	Content Testing
	Collateral Materials
	Market Testing
	Creating a Test Plan
	Resources for Testing
	Evaluating Test Results
	Testing Tips
8: Mastering, Duplication, and Distribution
	The Importance of Distribution
	Preparation of Physical Media
	Choosing Vendors
	Distribution Options
	Distribution Channels
	Marketing
	Sales
	Distribution Tips
9: Follow-up
	Development Wrap-Up
	Maintenance
	Training
	Documentation
	Customer Relations
	Repurposing Work
	Follow-up Tips
Resources
	Books, Periodicals, Pamphlets, Organizations, Foundations,
	Training and Schools, Conferences, Software and Hardware
	Tools
Glossary/Index

Bookmark: B.Hix.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing User Interfaces: Ensuring Usability Through Product and Process
Author: Hix, Deborah
Author: Hartson, H. Rex
Date: 1993
Pages: 381
City: New York, New York
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-57813-4, OCLC
Standard number: QA 76.9 U83 H59
Contents:
INTRODUCTION
What is this book about?
Who should read this book?
Why is this book different?
What are the objectives of this book?
What are the organization and content of this book?
How do you use the exercises?
Where did this book come from?
1. ENSURING USABILITY IN HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (1)
1.1  The Ubiquitous User Interface
1.2  What Is Usability?
1.3  Everyone Is An Expert
1.4  Developing Human-Computer Interaction
1.5  Behavioral and Constructional Domains
1.6  Roles in User Interface Development
1.7  Design Versus Development
1.8  The Value of Usability
I: THE PRODUCT (13)
2. USER INTERACTION DESIGN GUIDANCE: STANDARDS, GUIDELINES, & STYLE GUIDES (15)
2.1  What Is Human Factors?
2.2  Kinds of Human Factors Information
2.3  Guidelines
3. INTERACTION STYLES (57)
3.1  What Are Interaction Styles?
3.2  Windows
3.3  Menus
3.4  Forms
3.5  Boxes
3.6  Typed-command Languages
3.7  Graphical Interfaces
3.8  Other Interaction Styles
II: THE PROCESS
4. ITERATIVE EVALUATION-CENTERED USER INTERACTION DEVELOPMENT (95)
4.1  Principles for the Process of User Interaction Development and Its Management
4.2  Life Cycle Concepts for Software Development
4.3  Observing How Developers Work:  Alternating Waves of Activity
4.4  A Life Cycle for User Interaction Development
4.5  Usability Management
4.6  Connections to Software Engineering
4.7  Summary
5. AN OVERVIEW OF SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN (117)
5.1  Early Analysis Activities
5.2  Design
5.3  Summary
6. TECHNIQUES FOR REPRESENTING USER INTERACTION DESIGN (147)
6.1  Design Representation as a Development Activity
6.2  The Need for Behavioral Representation
6.3  Some Existing Representation Techniques
6.4  Introducing the User Action Notation (UAN)
6.5  Introducing a Simple Example
6.6  Devices and Primitive User Actions
6.7  Objects and Their Contexts
6.8  Interface Feedback
6.9  State Information
6.10  Conditions of Viability
6.11  Extensibility of the UAN
6.12  Task Repetition
6.13  More Exercises
6.14  Conclusions about Use of the UAN
7. MORE ON USING THE USER ACTION NOTATION (185)
7.1  Introducing Temporal Relations
7.2  Sequence
7.3  Combining Smaller Tasks into Larger Ones
7.4  Task Names, Macros, and Levels of Abstraction
7.5  Choice
7.6  Repeating Choice
7.7  Order Independence
7.8  Interruption
7.9  Interleavability
7.10  Concurrency
7.11  Intervals and Waiting
7.12  Summary of UAN Symbols
7.13  Exercises on Using UAN
7.14  Supplementary Representation Techniques
7.15  Final UAN Exercise
7.16  Extensions to the UAN
7.17  Software Tools for UAN Support
7.18  Experiences with the UAN
8. USABILITY SPECIFICATION TECHNIQUES (221)
8.1  What Are Usability Specifications?
8.2  Example of a Usability Specification Table
8.3  Setting Levels in the Usability Specification Table
8.4  Another Example
8.5  Hints to Help Create Usability Specification Tables
8.6  Cautions on Use of Usability Specifications
8.7  Summary
8.8  Exercise on Usability Specifications
9. RAPID PROTOTYPING OF INTERACTION DESIGN (249)
9.1  What is Rapid Prototyping?
9.2  Types of Prototyping
9.3  Weighing Rapid Prototyping
9.4  What to Put in a Prototype
9.5  Rapid Prototyping Tools
9.6  Examples From a Development Project
9.7  Summary and Future
9.8  Exercise on Rapid Prototyping
10. FORMATIVE EVALUATION (283)
10.1  What is Formative Evaluation?
10.2  Developing the Experiment
10.3  Directing the Evaluation Session
10.4  Generating and Collecting the Data
10.5  Analyzing the Data
10.6  Drawing Conclusions to Form a Resolution for Each Problem
10.7  Redesigning and Implementing the Revised Interface
10.8  Setting Up a Usability Lab
10.9  Conclusions
10.10  Exercise on Formative Evaluation
11. USER INTERFACE DEVELOPMENT TOOLS (341)
11.1  Classes of User Interface Development Tools
11.2  About User Interface Development Tools
11.3  Interaction Style Support Tools
11.4  Toolkits
11.5  User Interface Management Systems
11.6  Status of User Interface Development Tools
11.7  Evaluation of User Interface Development Tools
12. MAKING IT WORK: ENSURING USABILITY IN YOUR DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT (361)
12.1  What Have We Covered in This Book?
12.2  But I Can't Possibly Do All This...
12.3  So Where Do I Begin?
12.4  Where Should Responsibility for Ensuring Usability Reside?
12.5  Developing a Plan to Ensure Usability
12.6  Parting Words
INDEX

Bookmark: B.Kosslyn.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Elements of Graph Design
Author: Kosslyn, Stephen Michael
Date: 1993
Pages: 309
Publisher: W H Freeman & Co.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-71672362-X

Bookmark: B.Price.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: How to Communicate Technical Information: A Handbook of Software and Hardware Documentation
Author: Price, Jonathan
Author: Korman, Henry
Date: 1993
Pages: 325
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: Benjamin/Cummings Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80536829-9 (pbk)
Note: Second Edition
Contents:
1. PLANNING
1. The Project Cycle - What You Do at Each Stage
2. Gathering Information
3. Understanding Your Audience and Their Work
4. Learning the Product
5. Planning the Documentation
6. Developing a Schedule and Estimating Costs
7. As You Work
2. WRITING
8. Openers - Tables of Contents and Introductions
9. Getting Users Started
10. Tutorials
11. Computer-Based Training
12. Procedures
13. Reference Materials
14. Indexes and Glossaries
15. Job Aids or Quick Reference Cards
16. Online Help
3. REVISING
17. Getting feedback
18. Rewriting Drafts
19. Refining Your Style
20. Updating a Manual
21. Reviewing Someone Else's Manual

Bookmark: B.Sanders.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Engineering and Design (7th Edition)
Author: Sanders, Mark S.
Author: McCormick, Ernest J.
Date: 1993
Pages: 790
City: New York
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-054901-X; TA 166.S33; OCLC 25245564
Contents:
1: INTRODUCTION
1. Human Factors and Systems (3)
2. Human Factors Research Methodologies (23)
2: INFORMATION INPUT
3. Information Input and Processing (47)
4. Text, Graphics, Symbols, and Codes (91)
5. Visual Displays of Dynamic Information (132)
6. Auditory, Tactual, and Olfactory Displays (160)
7. Speech Communications (197)
3: HUMAN OUTPUT AND CONTROL
8. Physical Work and Manual Materials Handling (225)
9. Motor Skills (273)
10. Human Control of Systems (301)
11. Controls and Data Entry Devices (334)
12. Hand Tools and Devices (383)
4: WORKPLACE DESIGN
13. Applied Anthropometry, Work-Space Design, and Seating (415)
14. Arrangement of Components within a Physical Space (456)
15. Interpersonal Aspects of Workplace Design (485)
5: ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
16. Illumination (511)
17. Climate (551)
18. Noise (589)
19. Motion (622)
6: HUMAN FACTORS APPLICATIONS
20. Human Error, Accidents, and Safety (655)
21. Human Factors and the Automobile (696)
22. Human Factors in Systems Design (726)
APPENDIXES
A. List of Abbreviations (759)
B. Control Devices (764)
C. NIOSH Recommended Action Limit Formula for Lifting Tasks (769)
INDEXES
Name Index (771)
Subject Index (781)

Bookmark: B.Dix.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Dix, Alan
Author: Finlay, Janet
Author: Abowd, Gregory
Author: Beale, Russell
Date: 1993
Number of Chapters: 15 chapters
Pages: 570
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-458266-7 (hardback); 0-13-437211-5 (paperback) only outside USA
Contents:
Introduction
Part 1: Foundations
1: The Human
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Input-Output Channels
1.3 Human Memory
1.4 Thinking: Reasoning and Problem-solving
1.5 Individual Differences
1.6 Psychology and the Design of Interactive Systems
1.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
2: The Computer
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Text Entry Devices
2.3 Positioning and Pointing Devices
2.4 Output Devices
2.5 Alternatives
2.6 Paper: Printing and Scanning
2.7 Memory
2.8 Processing
2.9 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
3: The Interaction
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Models of Interaction
3.3 Frameworks and HCI
3.4 Ergonomics
3.5 Interaction Styles
3.6 The Context of the Interaction
3.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
Part II: Design Practice
4: Usability Paradigms and Principles
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Paradigms for Interaction
4.3 Principles to Support Usability
4.4 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
5: The Design Process
5.1 Introduction
5.2 The Software Life Cycle
5.3 Using Design Rules
5.4 Usability Engineering
5.5 Iterative Design and Prototyping
5.6 Design Rationale
5.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
6: Models of the User in Design
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Cognitive Models
6.3 Goal and Task Hierarchies
6.4 Linguistic Models
6.5 The Challenge of Display Based Systems
6.6 Physical and Device Models
6.7 Cognitive Architectures
6.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
7: Task Analysis
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Differences between Task Analysis and Other Techniques
7.3 Task Decomposition
7.4 Knowledge Based Analysis
7.5 Entity-Relationship Based Techniques
7.6 Sources of Information and Data Collection
7.7 Uses of Task Analysis
7.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
8: Dialogue Notations and Design
8.1 What is Dialogue?
8.2 Dialogue Design Notations
8.3 Diagrammatic Notations
8.4 Textual Dialogue Notations
8.5 Dialogue Semantics
8.6 Dialogue Analysis and Design
8.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
9: Models of the System
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Standard Formalisms
9.3 Interaction Models
9.4 Status/Event Analysis
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
10: Implementation Support
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Elements of Windowing Systems
10.3 Programming the Application
10.4 Using Toolkits
10.5 User Interface Management Systems
10.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
11: Evaluation Techniques
11.1 What is Evaluation?
11.2 Goals of Evaluation
11.3 Styles of Evaluation
11.4 Evaluating the Design
11.5 Evaluating the Implementation
11.6 Choosing an Evaluation Method
11.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
12: Help and Documentation
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Requirements of User Support
12.3 Approaches to User Support
12.4 Intelligent Help Systems
12.5 Designing User Support Systems
12.6 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
Part III: Advanced Topics
13: Groupware
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Groupware Systems
13.3 Computer-mediated Communication
13.4 Meeting and Decision Support Systems
13.5 Shared Applications and Artefacts
13.6 Frameworks for Groupware
13.7 Implementing Synchronous Groupware
13.8 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
14: CSCW Issues and Theories
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Face-to-face Communication
14.3 Conversation
14.4 Text Based Communication
14.5 Group Working
14.6 Organizational Issues
14.7 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
15: Multi-sensory Systems
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Usable Sensory Inputs
15.3 Multi-modal and Multi-media Systems
15.4 Speech in the Interface
15.5 Non-speech Sound
15.6 Handwriting Recognition
15.7 Text, Hypertext and Hypermedia
15.8 Animation and Video
15.9 Gesture Recognition
15.10 Computer Vision
15.11 Applications of Multi-media Systems
15.12 Summary
	Exercises
	Recommended Reading
References
Index

Bookmark: B.Apple.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Making it Macintosh
Author: Apple Computer, Inc.
Date: 1993
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-62626-8
Note: CD-ROM companion to Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines
Weblink: developer.apple.com/techpubs/mac/HIGuidelines/HIGuidelines-2.html
Contents:
Figures and Tables
Preface - About This Book
1 - Fundamentals
	1 - Human Interface Principles
	2 - General Design Considerations
	3 - Human Interface Design and the Development Process
2 - The Interface Elements
	4 - Menus
	5 - Windows
	6 - Dialog Boxes
	7 - Controls
	8 - Icons
	9 - Color
	10 - Behaviors
	11 - Language
Appendixes
	A - Resources
	B - Bibliography
	C - Checklist
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Ray.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience
Author: Ray, William J.
Date: 1993
Pages: 471
City: Pacific Grove, California
Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53417838-3
Note: Fourth Edition

Bookmark: B.OSF.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: OSF/Motif Style Guide
Author: Open Software Foundation
Date: 1993
Number of Chapters: revision 1.2 (for OSF/Motif release 1.2)
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-643123-2, OCLC 27405726
Keywords: OFS/Motif Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Lee.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Object-Oriented GUI Application Development
Author: Lee, Geoff
Date: 1993
Pages: 180 paperback
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-363086-2
Contents:
1  Introduction
	Overview of graphical user interface applications and this book
PART I	Software Development Life Cycle
2  Software Development Life Cycle Activities
	Structured Software Development Life Cycle
	Structured Rapid Prototyping Approach
	Object-Oriented Software Development
3  Life Cycle Activities of GUI Application Development
	GUI Application Development
	Preliminary Requirements Specification
	GUI Application Analysis
	GUI Design
	GUI Prototyping
	GUI Evaluation
	GUI Application Integration
PART II	Analysis Activities of GUI Application Development
4  Analyzing Users
	Overview
	User Analysis Factors
	Procedure for Conducting User Analysis
	Case Study: A Personnel Recruiting Application
5  Analyzing User Tasks
	Modeling Human-Computer Interaction
	Simplified Task Model
	Task Modeling for Multiple User-Role Applications
	A Textual Notation for Task Modeling
	Case Study: A Personnel Recruiting Application
6  Constructing User Interface Object Model
	Object Model
	User-Interface Level Object-Modeling Procedure
	Notation for User Interface Level Object Model
	Case Study: A Personnel Recruiting Application
PART III	Graphical User Interface Design Activities
7 User Interface System-Level Design
	System Partitioning on User-Group Boundaries
	Dynamic Behavior in a Task Model
	Prioritizing Object-Model Elements
	Logical Grouping of Object-Model Elements
	Error-Prevention and -Recovery Behavior
	Case Study: A Personnel Recruiting Application
8  User Interface Metaphor Design
	Why User Interface Metaphors?
	Criteria of User Interface Metaphors
	Limitations of User Interface Metaphors
	User Interface Metaphor Design Procedure
	Notation for Metaphor-Mapped Object Model
	GUI Representation of Metaphors
	Case Study: A Personnel Recruiting Application
9  Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface Design
	GUI Design Mapping of the Object Model
	GUI Design Mapping of User Interface Metaphor
	User Interaction Models
	Style-Specific GUI Interaction Components
	User Interface Design Guidelines
	Presenting Application Objects
	Presenting the Relationships
	Presenting the Operations, Attributes, and Facets
10 Contextual Graphical User Interface Design
	States and Their Dependencies in GUI
	Temporal and Spatial Modes
	Visual Cues in Various Style Guides
	Contextual Messages in Style Guides
PART IV	Graphical User Interface Software Implementation
11 Software Architectural Design of GUI Applications
	Decomposing a Software System
	Subsystem Interfacing Mechanisms
	Dialog-Independent Software Architecture
	Software Mapping of the Object-Oriented Design
	Software Mapping of the Contextual GUI Design
	Integrating the Application
	Style-Independent Architecture
	Toolkit-Independent Software Architecture
	Locale-Independent Architecture
12 Implementing Graphical User Interface Software with Reusable Toolkits
	Graphical User Interface Environments
	User Interface Software Development Environments
	Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface Toolkits
	User Interface Rapid-Prototyping Tools
	Bibliography
Absract: MindFrame for Windows 1.0 Release Note (November 17, 1993) * INTERNET ACCESS: mndframe.zip (MindFrame for Windows) is available for anonymous ftp ftp://ftp.cica.indiana.edu/pub/pc/win3/programr and its mirror sites. * CompuServe ACCESS: It is also in the library of the following forums: IBMAPP, WINUSER, and RELIGION. Do a search on user ID 76460,2760 to locate the file (different file names in different forum library). Please send any comment or suggestion to Geoff Lee ("gcl@netcom.com" on Internet, or 76460,2760 on CompuServe). "MindFrame for Windows" is a freeware application developed to teach an object modeling approach presented in the book: "Object-Oriented GUI Application Development" Geoff Lee, Prentice Hall, 1993, ISBN 0-13-363086-2. This application is useful in many other areas as well, for example, in Bible studying (metaphors, parables, prophecies, types), neural modeling, ecological modeling, and task modeling. There are 20 sample applications covering these areas. There are also description of each of the sample application in the on-line Help. Read "About MindFrame..." help topic for more information. This is a copyrighted software, but you can freely redistribute if you keep the release intact. The following is the content of mdnframe.txt file in the .zip file: 1 Installation Procedure: DOS> mkdir MndFrame DOS> cd MndFrame DOS> copy b:MndFrame.zip (or where you kept the mndframe.zip file) DOS> unzip -d mndframe.zip (extract files into subdirectories) DOS> copy grid.vbx \windows\systems (your local Windows system directory) 2 Running the application: . In Windows, open your "File Manager" . Go to \MndFrame directory . Find the MndFrame.exe file . Drag the MndFrame.exe file icon into a "Program Manager" window . Open the MndFrame.exe program 3 Sample applications: Once you are in the MindFrame application, open files in the \MndFrame\Samples subdirectories. There are 20 sample files organized according to areas of application (e.g., object modeling, neural modeling, bible studying). You can also find description of each of these samples in the On-Line Help file. 4 On-line help: Use the "About MindFrame..." menu item in the "Help" menu to learn more about this application. There is an on-line help provided for this application. Read through the help topics to learn about using this application. 5 Files in this release: mndframe.txt: this file mdnframe.exe: the executable file of "MindFrame for Windows" freeware mndframe.hlp: the on-line help file for "MindFrame for Windows" biblnote.ps: the PostScript file of help text on using this application to study metaphors, parables, types, and prophecies in the Holy Bible. grid.vbx: the visual basic grid control that is necessary to run this application. It must be copied into your local "system" directory for Windows (\windows\system in most cases). samples\*: in this directory, there are 20 samples (*.frm files) in the subdirectories for each application area (e.g., objmodel, ecology, neural, parable).
Absract: Software programmers developing GUI applications across a variety of platforms face a number of challenges. "Object-oriented GUI Application Development" addresses these challenges by presenting an object-oriented life-cycle methodology that integrates the process of developing an application with the development of the application's graphical user interface. Rather than focusing on the API level, Lee shows how the high level abstractions of user task model, application object model, and metaphor mental model can be used to guide the development of graphical user interfaces for a variety of graphical environments. The first part of the book examines various software development approaches and their life-cycle activities. The second part focuses on analysis activities, including analyzing users and construct the user task model and application object model. The third part presents user interface metaphor design, as well as object-oriented and contextual GUI design following Apple Macintosh, Microsoft Windows, Motif, OPEN LOOK, and NeXTSTEP styles. The fourth part examines GUI implementation on a number of graphical environments with various object-oriented toolkits or application frameworks. Key Features: * Presents an object-oriented life-cycle approach universally applicable to various standard style guides and windowing environments. * Examines GUI application development from the perspective of the higher level abstractions of user task model, application object model, and metaphor mental model. * Deals specifically with object-oriented GUI applications, and covers a number of object-oriented toolkits and application frameworks.

Bookmark: B.Ericsson.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Protocol Analysis: Verbal Reports as Data
Author: Ericsson, K. Anders
Author: Simon, Herbert A.
Date: 1993
Pages: 496
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-55023-7 (paper) 0-262-05047-1 (cloth)
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Note: Revised Edition
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Kearsley.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Public Access Systems: Bringing Computer Power to the People
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Kearsley, Greg
Date: 1993
Pages: 192
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-947-0 (cloth); 0-89391-948-9 (paper)
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/kearsley/public.htm

Bookmark: B.Uren.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software Internationalization and Localization: An Introduction
Author: Uren, Emmanuel
Author: Howard, Robert
Author: Perinotti, Tiziana
Date: 1993
Pages: 300
City: New York
Publisher: Van Nostrand-Reinhold
Standard number: ISBN: 0-44-201498-8
Keywords: software localization; internationalization; globalization
Contents:
Preface
1. Introduction
1. ISSUES
2. Issues in Software Internationalization and Localization
2. INTERNATIONALIZATION AND LOCALIZATION FOR WESTERN EUROPEAN LANGUAGES ON THE IBM PC
3. General Topics
4. Specific Topics
3. OTHER COMPUTERS AND OTHER LANGUAGES
5. Other Computers
6. Other Languages
7. Standards and Standards Organizations
4. BUSINESS ASPECTS
8. Logistics, Roles, and Responsibilities
9. Cost Considerations
10. Going the Other Way: Europe to America
Appendix A Paper Sizes
Appendix B UNIX
Appendix C Macintosh
Appendix D The Basic Concepts of Computers: Software
Appendix E The Basic Concepts of Computers: Hardware
Appendix F Alphabetic List of Localizers with Experience in Western European Languages
Appendix G Names and Addresses of Standards Organizations
Appendix H Wordperfect 5.1 Character Sets
Appendix I DOS Code Pages
Appendix J ISO Character Sets
Appendix K Macintosh Character Sets
Appendix L HP-UX Character Sets
Appendix M DOS National Language Support System Functions
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Greenberg.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Computer User as Toolsmith: The Use, Reuse, and Organization of Computer-Based Tools
Series Title: Cambridge Series on Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Greenberg, Saul
Date: 1993
Pages: 187
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-521-40430-4; QA76.9H85G73
Contents:
1. Introduction
1.1. Using physical tools
1.2. Soft tools in general-purpose computing environments
1.3. Outline
2. Studying UNIX
2.1. Choosing UNIX
2.2. Techniques for analyzing activities of UNIX users
2.3. Data collection for the current study
3. Using commands in UNIX
3.1. Frequency distributions of commands for large groups
3.2. Usage frequency of particular commands between groups
3.3. Frequency distributions and command overlap between individuals
3.4. Growth of the command vocabulary
3.5. Relations in command sequences
4. Techniques for reusing activities
4.1. History mechanisms
4.2. Adaptive systems
4.3. Reuse through programming by example
5. Recurrent systems
5.1. A definition of recurrent systems
5.2. Recurrent systems in the non-computer world
5.3. Recurrent systems in information retrieval
5.4. UNIX csh as a recurrent system
6. Reuse opportunities in UNIX csh - potential and actual
6.1. Conditioning the distribution
6.2. Actual use of UNIX history
7. Principles, corroboration, and justification
7.1. Principles and guidelines
7.2. Corroboration
7.3. Stepping back
7.4. Concluding remarks
8. Organizing activities through workspaces
8.1. Relating activities
8.2. Implications: suggestions workspaces
8.3. Implementations
9. A workspace system: description and issues
9.1. The WORKBENCH system
9.2. Pragmatic concerns and research questions
10. Conclusion
10.1. Argument of the book
10.2. Contributions
10.3. Looking to the future
	Appendix A: A sample trace
	Appendix B: Summary statistics for each subject

Bookmark: B.Grantham.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Digital Workplace: Designing Groupware
Author: Grantham, Charles E.
Author: Nichols, Larry
Date: 1993
Pages: 248
City: New York, New York
Publisher: Van Nostrand-Reinhold
Standard number: ISBN: 0-442-01123-7
Contents:
1. Introduction (Development of appreciation for why you need to
plan for introduction of new technologies)
The Future of Work: Prologue
	Decreasing Organizational Size
	Return of Work to the Home and Community
The Purpose of this Book
	Increased Decision Effectiveness
	Technology Diffusion Creates Change
The Plan of this Book
	The Enneagram Model: History and Applications
	Difference Between Thinking and Doing Processes
2. Communication: The Matrix of Interaction (Interpersonal Communication)
Theories of Communication
	Temporal Aspects
	Levels of Communication
	Pragmatics
Flow versus Particle Perspectives: The Competing World Views
Creation of Shared Realities
	Social Construction of Realities
Technology Impacts on Mediated Communication
	Communication Patterns and Affect
	Role Relationships and Organizational Behavior
		CASE STUDY
Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Phenomenological Approach
3. Designing the Organization (How to plan the design process)
Principles of Design
	Design as Opposed to Engineering
	History of Technology Design
	Six Principles for Organizational Technology Design
A Model of Organizational Health: The Six Factors
	Relationship of Elements to Information Flows
	Function--Information Flow--Diagnostics
Organizational Intervention Strategies and Evolution
	How to Correct Imbalances in Organizational Process
4. Customer Service and Quality: External Relationships (Building teams with technology)
Strategic Customer Service
	Elements of Customer Satisfaction
	Assessment
	Where you are?
	Your Business Issues
Partnerships
	External-Internal
	Permeable Boundaries
Customers-End-Users-and Customer's Customer's
		CASE STUDY
Development and Operating Functions: Strategic Customer Service
5. Engineering Your Business: Internal Influences (Getting More Effective with Less)
Business Process Analysis
	The Methodology of Analysis
Social Roles and Business Functions
	Technology, Teamwork and Business Process
	Relationships Between Employee Attitude, Customer Satisfaction and Business Success
The Six Steps of Process Management
	Quality Improvement and Technology
6. Organizational Structure and Technology Impacts (Re-Engineering your Business Enterprise)
Theories of Organizations and Technology
	The Structural Approach
	Socio-Technical Systems
Matrix of System Complexity and Issues of Managerial Concern
	The Relationship of Information Technologies and Organizational Issues
Managing the Change Process: Practical Advice
		CASE STUDY
Integrating Customer Service Support: What Went Wrong
7. New Models of Thinking (Taking a Larger View)
Systems: Closed, Open and Evolving
	Viable Systems Model
	Generative Rationality
Visual Thinking and Information Flows
Systems Through Time: Simulation Models:
	The Dialectic Model
	Technology Integration: Computers-Telecommunications and Education-Entertainment
8. Continuous Learning as an Institution (Getting Better at Getting Better)
Difference between Learning and Training
"Just in Time Learning"
Managing Value Shifts
Systems to Support Learning
The Emerging Technologies of Learning: Multimedia and Virtual Reality
		CASE STUDY
Video and Computer Arts and Organizational Learning
9. Epilogue: Improving the Self (Guiding the Process)
Self-Knowledge: Opening the Door
	Moving Beyond Right and Left Brain Thinking
Blending Mind, Body and Spirit
Metamorphosis
Meetings with Yourself
The Quest
Index

Bookmark: B.Microsoft.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The GUI Guide: International Terminology for the Windows Interface
Author: Microsoft Corporation
Date: 1993
Pages: 239
City: Redmond, WA
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55615-538-7
Keywords: Microsoft Windows Style Guidelines
Keywords: internationalization, localization, globalization

Bookmark: B.Tilley.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Measure of Man: Human Factors in Design
Author: Tilley, Alvin R.
Author: Dreyfus, Henry
Date: 1993
Pages: 96
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Whitney Library of Design
Standard number: ISBN: 0-82303031-8
Note: Revised Edition

Bookmark: B.Hiltz.93b
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Network Nation: Human Communication via Computer
Author: Hiltz, Starr Roxanne
Author: Turoff, Murray
Date: 1993
Pages: 557
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-58120-5 (pbk)
Note: Revised Edition
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Barfield.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The User Interface: Concepts and Design
Author: Barfield, Lon
Date: 1993
Pages: 400
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-54441-5 0-80473871-8

Bookmark: B.Hiltz.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Virtual Classroom: Learning Without Limits via Computer Networks
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Hiltz, Starr Roxanne
Date: 1993
Pages: 304
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-928-4 (cloth); 1-56750-055-2 (paper)
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/hiltz/virtual.htm

Bookmark: B.Heim.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The metaphysics of virtual reality
Author: Heim, Michael
Date: 1993
Pages: 175
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-19508178-1, OCLC 26855275
Contents:
1 Infomania
2 Logic and intuition
3 Hypertext heaven
4 Thought processing
5 Heidegger and McLuhan: the computer as component
6 From interface to cyberspace
7 The erotic ontology of cyberspace
8 The essence of VR
9 Virtual-reality check
10 The electronic cafe lecture

Bookmark: B.Norman.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Things That Make Us Smart: Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 1993
Pages: 290
City: Reading, Massachusetts
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: Perseus
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-58129-9
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-62695-0
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/things-that-make-us-smart-defending-human-attributes-in-the-age-of-the-machine.html
Contents:
1. A Human Centered Technology
2. Experiencing the World
3. The Power of Representation
4. Fitting the Artifact to the Person
5. The Human Mind
6. Distributed Cognition
7. A Place for Everything, and Everything in Its Place
8. Predicting the Future
9. Soft and Hard Technology
10. Technology is Not Neutral

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Usability Engineering
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Date: 1993
Pages: 358 + xiv
City: Boston, MA
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-518405-0 (hardcover), OCLC 27640655; 0-12-518406-9 (paperback)
Weblink: www.useit.com/jakob/useengbook.html
Contents:
Preface
Audience
Teaching Usability Engineering
1	Executive Summary
1.1	Cost Savings
1.2	Usability Now!
1.3	Usability Slogans
	Your Best Guess Is Not Good Enough
	The User Is Always Right
	The User Is Not Always Right
	Users Are Not Designers
	Designers Are Not Users
	Vice Presidents Are Not Users
	Less Is More
	Details Matter
	Help Doesn't
	Usability Engineering Is Process
1.4	Discount Usability Engineering
	Scenarios
	Simplified Thinking Aloud
	Heuristic Evaluation
1.5	Recipe For Action
2	What Is Usability?
2.1	Usability and Other Considerations
2.2	Definition of Usability
	Learnability
	Efficiency of Use
	Memorability
	Few and Noncatastrophic Errors
	Subjective Satisfaction
2.3	Example: Measuring the Usability of Icons
2.4	Usability Trade-Offs
2.5	Categories of Users and Individual User Differences
3	Generations of User Interfaces
3.1	Batch Systems
3.2	Line-Oriented Interfaces
3.3	Full-Screen Interfaces
	Menu Hierarchies
3.4	Graphical User Interfaces
3.5	Next-Generation Interfaces
3.6	Long-Term Trends in Usability
4	The Usability Engineering Lifecycle
4.1	Know the User
	Individual User Characteristics
	Task Analysis
	Functional Analysis
	The Evolution of the User
4.2	Competitive Analysis
4.3	Goal Setting
	Financial Impact Analysis
4.4	Parallel Design
4.5	Participatory Design
4.6	Coordinating the Total Interface
4.7	Guidelines and Heuristic Evaluation
4.8	Prototyping
	Scenarios
4.9	Interface Evaluation
	Severity Ratings
4.10	Iterative Design
	Capture the Design Rationale
4.11	Follow-Up Studies of Installed Systems
4.12	Meta-Methods
4.13	Prioritizing Usability Activities
4.14	Be Prepared
5	Usability Heuristics
5.1	Simple and Natural Dialogue
	Graphic Design and Color
	Less Is More
5.2	Speak the Users' Language
	Mappings and Metaphors
5.3	Minimize User Memory Load
5.4	Consistency
5.5	Feedback
	Response Time
	System Failure
5.6	Clearly Marked Exits
5.7	Shortcuts
5.8	Good Error Messages
	Multiple-Level Messages
5.9	Prevent Errors
	Avoid Modes
5.10	Help and Documentation
	A Model of Documentation Use
	The Minimal Manual
5.11	Heuristic Evaluation
	Effect of Evaluator Expertise
6	Usability Testing
	Reliability
	Validity
6.1	Test Goals and Test Plans
	Test Plans
	Test Budget
	Pilot Tests
6.2	Getting Test Users
	Novice versus Expert Users
	Between-Subjects versus Within-Subjects Testing
6.3	Choosing Experimenters
6.4	Ethical Aspects of Tests with Human Subjects
6.5	Test Tasks
6.6	Stages of a Test
	Preparation
	Introduction
	Running the Test
	Debriefing
6.7	Performance Measurement
6.8	Thinking Aloud
	Constructive Interaction
	Retrospective Testing
	Coaching Method
6.9	Usability Laboratories
	To Videotape or Not
	Cameraless Videotaping
	Portable Usability Laboratories
	Usability Kiosks
7	Usability Assessment Methods beyond Testing
7.1	Observation
7.2	Questionnaires and Interviews
7.3	Focus Groups
7.4	Logging Actual Use
	Combining Logging with Follow-Up Interviews
7.5	User Feedback
7.6	Choosing Usability Methods
	Combining Usability Methods
8	Interface Standards
	User Benefits from Consistency and Standards
	Vendor Benefits from Consistency and Standards
	The Dangers of Standards
8.1	National, International and Vendor Standards
8.2	Producing Usable In-House Standards
9	International User Interfaces
9.1	International Graphical Interfaces
	Gestural Interfaces
9.2	International Usability Engineering
9.3	Guidelines for Internationalization
	Characters
	Numbers and Currency
	Time and Measurement Units
	Don't Despair
9.4	Resource Separation
9.5	Multilocale Interfaces
10	Future Developments
10.1	Theoretical Solutions
10.2	Technological Solutions
10.3	CAUSE Tools: Computer-Aided Usability Engineering
10.4	Technology Transfer
Appendix A	Exercises
	Hints
Appendix B	Bibliography
B.1	Conference Proceedings
B.2	Journals
B.3	Introductions and Textbooks
B.4	Handbook
B.5	Reprint Collections
B.6	Important Monographs and Collections of Original Papers
B.7	Guidelines
	Style Guides
B.8	Videotapes
B.9	Other Bibliographies
	Bibliographic Databases

Bookmark: B.Cox.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Design
Author: Cox, Kevin
Author: Walter, David
Date: 1993
Pages: 362
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-952888-1
Note: 2nd Edition
Contents:
1. What Makes a Good Computer System?
2. Systems Development
3. Usability Testing
4. Objects and Actions
5. Guide-lines for User-Interfaces
6. Designing a Dialogue Model
7. User Documentation
8. Forms of Documentation
9. Implementation

Bookmark: B.Galitz.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Interface Screen Design
Author: Galitz, Wilbert O.
Date: 1993
Pages: 532
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Publisher: Q. E. D. Information Sciences Inc.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-56156-8; OCLC 30742052
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89435-406-X; OCLC 24954590; paper
Keywords: DESIGN Display Prototype
Contents:
1	Introduction (1)
2	The System User (9)
3	System Considerations (21)
4	Considerations in Screen Design (59)
5	Data Entry Screens (129)
6	Inquiry Screens (183)
7	Multipurpose Screens (203)
8	Question and Answer Screens (205)
9	Menu Screens (209)
10	Graphical Screens (243)
11	Iconic Screens (387)
12	Statistical Graphics (403)
13	Color in Screen Design (425)
14	Source Documents (453)
15	Screen Design Steps (475)
References (503)
Index (521-532)

Bookmark: B.Sproull.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Connections: New Ways of Working in the Networked Organization
Author: Sproull, Lee
Author: Kiesler, Sara
Date: 1992
Pages: 300
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-69158-2
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (Second Edition)
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Date: 1992
Pages: 592
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-57286-9, OCLC
Contents:
1	Human Factors of Interactive Software
2	Theories, Principles, and Guidelines
3	Menu Selection and Form Fillin
4	Command Languages
5	Direct Manipulation
6	Interaction Devices
7	Response Time and Display Rate
8	System Messages, Screen Design, and Color
9	Multiple-Window Strategies
10	Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
11	Information Exploration Tools
12	Printed Manuals, Online Help, and Tutorials
13	Iterative Design, Testing, and Evaluation
14	User-Interface Development Environments
Social and Individual Impact of User Interfaces

Bookmark: B.Banks.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Effective Computer Display Design
Author: Banks, William W.
Date: 1992
Pages: 219 +
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-401027-2

Bookmark: B.Wickens.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
Author: Wickens, Christopher D.
Date: 1992
Pages: 560
Publisher: HarperCollins
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67346161-0
Note: Second Edition

Bookmark: B.Taylor.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Global Software: Developing Applications for the International Market
Author: Taylor, Dave
Date: 1992
Pages: 319
City: New York
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 0-38797706-6
Keywords: internationalization

Bookmark: B.Marcus.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Graphic Design for Electronic Documents and User Interfaces
Author: Marcus, Aaron
Date: 1992
Pages: 266
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: ACM Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-54364-8, OCLC 23462016; ACM Order number 703900
Contents:
1	Layout
1.1	Proportion and Grids: Invisible Keys to Successful Layout
1.2	Graphic Design of Spatial Metaphors, Displays, and Tools
1.3	An Annotated Bibliography for Graphic Design of Spatial Displays
2	Typography
2.1	Making Type Decisions
2.2	Forms Design
2.3	The Typography of Complex Documentation: Computer Programs
3	Symbolism
3.1	Clarity and Consistency in Icon Design
3.2	Icon Design Tips
3.3	Icon Design in a CAD/CAM Graphical User Interface: A Case Study
3.4	An Annotated Bibliography of Signs, Icons, and Symbols
4	Color
4.1	The Ten Commandments of Color
4.2	An Annotated Bibliography of Color
5	Visualizing Knowledge: Charts, Diagrams, and Maps
5.1	Chart Design
5.2	An Annotated Bibliography of Chart and Diagram Design
5.3	An Annotated Bibliography of Map Design
6	Screen Design for User Interfaces
6.1	Common User-Interface Design
6.2	The User-Interface Standards Manual as a Tool for Effective Management
7	A Comparison of Graphical User Interfaces
7.1	Windowing Systems
7.2	Windowing-System Overview
7.3	Windows
7.4	Menus
7.5	Controls and Control Panels
7.6	Query and Message Boxes
7.7	Mouse/Keyboard Interface
7.8	Analysis of Common Tasks
7.9	Advantages and Disadvantages
A	Windowing-System Dependent Terminology
B	Detailed System Descriptions and Comparisons

Bookmark: B.Marca.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Groupware: Software for Computer Supported Cooperative Work
Author: Marca, David
Author: Bock, Geoffrey
Date: 1992
Pages: 575
City: Los Alamitos, California
Publisher: IEEE Computer Society Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-81862637-2

Bookmark: B.Apple.loc.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Guide to Macintosh Software Localization
Author: Apple Computer Inc.
Date: 1992
Pages: 330
City: Reading, Massachusetts
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-60856-1
Keywords: internationalization; software localization

Bookmark: B.Johnson.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Johnson, Peter
Date: 1992
Pages: 217
City: Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-707235-9

Bookmark: B.Apple.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Macintosh Human Interface Guidelines
Author: Apple Computer, Inc.
Date: 1992
Pages: 384
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-62216-5, OCLC 27820109
Contents:
Preface: About this Book
Part 1: Fundamentals
	1. Human Interface Principles
	2. General Design Considerations
	3. Human Interface Design and the Development Process
Part 2: The Interface Elements
	4. Menus
	5. Windows
	6. Dialog Boxes
	7. Controls
	8. Icons
	9. Color
	10. Behaviors
	11. Language
Appendixes
	Appendix A: Resources
	Appendix B: Bibliography
	Appendix C: Checklist
	Glossary
	Index

Bookmark: B.NeXT.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: NeXTSTEP User Interface Guidelines
Author: NeXT Computer, Inc.
Date: 1992
Pages: 184
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-63250-0
Keywords: NeXT Style Guidelines
Note: Release 3
Contents:
Introduction
1. A Visual Guide to the User Interface
An Application's Windows
Controls
2. Design Philosophy
Basic Principles
Action Paradigms
Extensions
Testing User Interfaces
3. User Actions: The Keyboard and Mouse
How the Keyboard and Mouse Work
Implementing Special Keys
Implementing Mouse Actions
Managing the Cursor
Implementing Selection
4. The Window Interface to Applications
How Windows Work
Implementing Windows
Implementing Standard Windows
Implementing Window and Application Status
5. Panels
How Panels Work
Implementing Ordinary Panels
Implementing Attention Panels
Standard Panels
6. Menus
How Menus Work
Implementing Menus
Standard Menus and Commands
7. Controls
Buttons
Text Fields
Sliders
Color Wells
Scrollers
Browsers and Selection Lists
Choosing the Appropriate Control
8. The Interface to the File System
How the File System Is Organized
Using Paths
Using File Name Extensions
Using File Packages
Creating Unrequested Files and Folders
Displaying File Names
Suggested Reading
Glossary

Bookmark: B.IBM.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Object-Oriented Interface Design: IBM Common User Access Guidelines
Author: IBM
Date: 1992
Number of Chapters: SC34-4399
Pages: 708
City: Carmel, Indiana
Publisher: Que
Standard number: ISBN: 1-56529-170-0; OCLC 28166156
Keywords: SAA/CUA, Systems application architecture, Common user access, Style Guidelines
Note: Supersedes the original CUA 91 books: The SAA CUA Guide to User Interface Design (SC34-4289) The SAA CUA Advanced Interface Design Reference (SC34-4290)
Absract: Brochure and Diskette: The CUA Vision: Bringing the Future Into Focus (G242-0215). The diskette has an animation of how IBM sees some of the future of user interface. There are some non-IBM systems that also hold copies of this. The known places are: * hobbes.nmsu.edu (128.123.35.151) pub/os2/info directory. (IBMCUA-1.ZOO and IBMCUA-2.ZOO) * BIX: IBM.OS2/LISTINGS (CUAVD.TXT AND CUAVDn.ZIP:n=1 to 7) * Compuserv: IBM FILES data library of the IBMOS2 forum. * Icaro BBS, in Madrid, Spain. Phone 34-1-519-4645. (8,n,1, speed up to V32bis) * The Hub BBS (203-663-1147). File area 55 ... OS/2 - Text (IBMCUAn.LZH n=1 to 5) VHS Videocassette: The CUA Vision: Bringing the Future Into Focus. The video talks about the CUA interface, why it is the way it is and how it might develop. * GV26-1003-00 Tape: VHS Signal: NTSC * GV26-1004-00 Tape: VHS Signal: PAL * GV26-1005-00 Tape: VHS Signal: SECAM

Bookmark: B.GO.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: PenPoint User Interface Design Reference
Author: GO Corporation
Date: 1992
Pages: 310
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-60858-8
Keywords: PenPoint Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Mayhew.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Principles and Guidelines in Software User Interface Design
Author: Mayhew, Deborah J.
Date: 1992
Pages: 619
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-721929-6
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. The User Profile
3. Conceptual Models
4. Menus
5. Fill-in Forms
6. Question and Answer
7. Command Languages
8. Function Keys
9. Direct Manipulation
10. Natural Language
11. Dialog Styles Summary
12. Input and Output Devices
13. Organization of Functionality
14. Screen Layout and Design
15. Response Time
16. Error Handling
17. User Documentation
18. Summary and Conclusions

Bookmark: B.Borenstein.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Programming as if People Mattered: Friendly Programs, Software Engineering, and Other Noble Delusions
Author: Borenstein, Nathaniel S.
Date: 1992
Pages: 200
City: Princeton, New Jersey
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-691-08762-0
Contents:
PART ONE. The Journey to the East: Can Software Engineers Build User Interfaces?
1.	The Hostile Beast
PART TWO. The Dark Night of the Soul: The State of the Art in User-Interface Design
2.	Who Are All These People?
3.	Stopwatches, Videotapes, and Human Nature
4.	That Reminds Me of the Time...
5.	The Quest for the Perfect Line Editor
6.	The Men in Suits
7.	Information Wants to Be Free
PART THREE. The Ten Commandments: Principles for User-Interface Design
8.	Never Underestimate Your Users
9.	Pretend That Small is Beautiful, but Don't Believe It
10.	Tune Defaults to the Novice
11.	Don't Neglect the Experts
12.	Your Program Stinks, and So Do You
13.	Listen to Your Users, but Ignore What They Say
14.	Lie to Your Managers
15.	Cut Corners Proudly
16.	Remember Your Ignorance
17.	Dabble in Mysticism
18.	Break All the Rules
PART FOUR. The Golden Path: The Road to Human-Oriented Software Engineering
19.	The Tools of the Trade
20.	The Ivory Tower
21.	People Are Perverse: Designing for the Fickle User
EPILOGUE. Programming, Humility, and the Eclipse of the Self

Bookmark: B.Meadow.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Text Information Retrieval Systems
Author: Meadow, Charles T.
Date: 1992
Pages: 302
City: San Diego, California
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-487410-X; Z699 M413 1991
Contents:
1	Introduction
2	Data, Information, and Knowledge
3	Representation of Information
4	Attribute Content and Values
5	Logical Models of Data Structure
6	The Physical Structure of Data
7	Querying the Information Retrieval System
8	Interpretation and Execution of Query Statements
9	Text Searching
10	Multi-Database Searching and Mapping
11	Search Feedback and Iteration
12	Search Strategy
13	The Information Retrieval System Interface
14	Measurement and Evaluation
Index (295-302)

Bookmark: B.Microsoft.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Windows Interface: An Application Design Guide
Author: Microsoft Corporation
Date: 1992
Pages: 228
City: Redmond, WA
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55615-439-9, OCLC 27148664
Keywords: Microsoft Windows Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Tognazzini.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Tog on Interface
Author: Tognazzini, Bruce
Date: 1992
Pages: 352
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-60842-1, OCLC 26158736
Contents:
PART I: THE EARLY YEARS (1)
1	Closing the Window of Vulnerability
2	The Creeping Learning Curve
3	Making Your First Macintosh Application a Success
4	The Lowdown on Layers and the Finder
5	Make the Most of Modes
6	Command Keys vs. the Mouse
7	Hiding the Menu Bar
8	HyperCard and the Apple Human Interface
9	Short Subjects
10	Take Out the Papers and the Trash
PART II: THE PROCESS OF DESIGN (57)
11	Three Key Players
12	Field Analysis
13	Brainstorming and Scenarios
14	User Testing on the Cheap
PART III: THE GOLDILOCKS THEORIES (91)
15	Carl Jung and the Macintosh
16	Information Theory
17	Conceptual Models
PART IV: THE NATURAL INTERFACE: PRINCIPLES TO DESIGN BY (143)
18	Natural Law
19	The Evolving, Adaptive, Consistent Environment
20	The Advent of Agents
21	Designing "Natural" Multimedia
PART V: MORE MAIL! (177)
22	The Holy Interface, or Command Keys Revisited
23	How to Make an Extra Couple Million in the 1990s
24	The Troof about Moof
25	The "3-D" Look in the Interface
26	The Cure for Trash Can Madness
27	Fitts' Law: Why Pull-Down Menus Work Best
28	More Short Subjects
29	OOP is All Greek to Me
30	Freedom, Rules, and the Illusion of Control
31	Three Corners for Reform
32	Watch Out for Those Loose Floorboards
33	Making an Interface Articulate
PART VI: OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO SUCCESS (253)
34	Rationalization, Assumption, and Denial
35	Second Release Software
36	Case Study: One-Or-More Buttons
37	A Glimpse of the Future
38	A Final Word
Appendix A: References (295)
Appendix B: Index of Principles and Guidelines (301)
Appendix C: Index of Letter Writers (317)
Index (319)

Bookmark: B.Norman.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Turn Signals Are the Facial Expressions of Automobiles
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 1992
Pages: 205
City: Reading, Massachusetts
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-58124-8 hdbk; 0-201-62236-X ppbk, OCLC 24671087
Weblink: www.jnd.org/books/turn-signals-are-the-facial-expressions-of-automobiles.html
Contents:
1.	I Go to a Sixth Grade Play
2.	Design Follies
3.	The Home Magazine Kitchen
4.	Refrigerator Doors and Message Centers
5.	High-Technology Gadgets
6.	The Teddy
7.	How Long is Noon?
8.	Real Time
9.	Nature's Packaging
10.	Evolution versus Design
11.	Turn Signals are the Facial Expressions of Automobiles
12.	Book Jackets and Science
13.	Brain Power
14.	Hofstadter's Law
15.	One Chance in a Million
16.	Coffee Cups in the Cockpit
17.	Writing as Design, Design as Writing

Bookmark: B.Olsen.92
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Management Systems: Models and Algorithms
Author: Olsen, Dan R., Jr.
Date: 1992
Pages: 231
City: Mountain View, CA
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 1-55860-220-8, OCLC 24701052
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. UIMS Architectures
3. State Machine UIMSs
4. Grammar UIMSs
5. Event-based UIMSs
6. Production Systems
7. Dialog Trees
8. Language UIMS Models
9. Constraint Systems for Visual Presentation
10. Editing Dialog Models
11. Interface Quality

Bookmark: B.Amiga.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Amiga User Interface Style Guide
Author: Commodore-Amiga, Inc
Date: 1991
Pages: 206
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-57757-7
Keywords: Amiga Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Krueger.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Artificial Reality II
Author: Krueger, Myron W.
Date: 1991
Pages: 288
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-52260-8; NX 180 T4 K7 1990
Contents:
1	Antecedents in Art and Technology (1-10)
2	Early Work: GLOWFLOW, METAPLAY, and PSYCHIC SPACE (11-32)
3	VIDEOPLACE (33-64)
4	Goggles and Gloves (65-82)
5	Artificial Reality: A New Aesthetic Medium (83-100)
6	Perception (101-122)
7	Reality Responds (123-150)
8	Controlling the Experience (151-168)
9	Applications (169-208)
10	Artificial Reality and the Arts (209-228)
11	Cybernetic Society (229-260)
Conclusion (261-266)
Glossary (267-280)
Index

Bookmark: B.Laurel.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computers as Theatre
Author: Laurel, Brenda
Date: 1991
Pages: 256
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-51048-0, OCLC 30699099; QA 76.9 H85 L38
Contents:
1	The Nature of the Beast (1-33)
	Representing Action
	Interface Evolution
	Interface Interdisciplines
	Throw the Baggage Out
	A Definitional Digression
	Models of the Interface
	The World's a Stage
	Theatre as an Interface Metaphor
	Interactivity and Human Activity
	Is Drama Serious Enough?
	An Artistic Perspective
2	Dramatic Foundations, Part I: Elements of Qualitative Structure (35-65)
	Delayed Gratification
	Hoary Poetics
	The Cultural Backdrop
	The Four Causes, or Why Things Are the Way They Are
	The Four Causes of Human-Computer Activity
	The Six Elements and Causal Relations Among Them
3	Dramatic Foundations, Part II: Orchestrating Action (67-92)
	Dramatic Potential: The "Flying" Wedge
	Dramatic Anatomy
4	Dramatic Techniques for Orchestrating Human Response (93-123)
	Form and Experience
	Constraints
	Engagement: The First-Person Imperative
5	Design Principles for Human-Computer Activity (125-165)
	Designing Action
	Designing Character and Thought
	Designing Language and Communication
	Designing Enactment
6	New Directions in Human-Computer Activity (167-198)
	Building a Better Mousetrap
	An Environment for Writing
	The Smart House: Actions in Search of Characters
	Multimedia
	Virtual Reality
	Beyond the Yellow Brick Road
	A New Opposable Thumb
References (199-206)
Index

Bookmark: B.Greenbaum.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design at Work: Cooperative Design of Computer Systems
Author: Greenbaum, J.
Author: Kyng, M.
Date: 1991
Pages: 294
City: Hillsdale, New Jersey
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80580611-3 (hdbk) 0-80580612-1 (pbk)

Bookmark: B.Bass.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Developing Software for the User Interface
Series Title: The SEI Series in Software Engineering
Author: Bass, Len
Author: Coutaz, Joelle
Date: 1991
Pages: 256
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-51046-4, OCLC
Standard number: QA 76.9.U83B37
Contents:
1	The Elements of User Interface Development
	1.1	The Software Engineering Life Cycle
	1.2	Roles
	1.3	User Interface Life Cycle
		1.3.1	Requirements Definition
		1.3.2	Specifications
		1.3.3	Implementation
	1.4	Mobile Robot Example
	1.5	Functional Core of the Mobile Robot Software
2	In Search of a Design Method
	2.1	An Overview of the Design Stages
	2.2	Define the Problem
	2.3	Model the Operator
		2.3.1	Semantic and Syntactic Knowledge
		2.3.2	Techniques for Identifying the Operator's Characteristics
		2.3.3	General Classification of Operators
	2.4	Perform Task Analysis
		2.4.1	Task Decomposition
		2.4.2	Task Decomposition Analysis
	2.5	Define Computer Objects and Functions
		2.5.1	Making the Task Objects Correspond to Computer Objects
		2.5.2	Providing General Services
		2.5.3	Deciding Who Drives the Interaction
	2.6	Design the User Interface
		2.6.1	Choosing Interaction Objects
		2.6.2	Making the System State Explicit
	2.7	Evaluate the Design
	2.8	Engineering Considerations
		2.8.1	Cost and Schedule Considerations
		2.8.2	Iterative Refinement
		2.8.3	Configuration Management
3	Window Systems
	3.1	Device Independence and Device Sharing
		3.1.1	Device Independence
		3.1.2	Window System Events
		3.1.3	Device Sharing
		3.1.4	Example
	3.2	Imaging Model
		3.2.1	Color
		3.2.2	Pixels as an Imaging Model
		3.2.3	PostScript
		3.2.4	PHIGS
		3.2.5	Fonts
	3.3	Resource Management
	3.4	Managing a Single Window
		3.4.1	Resizing a Window
		3.4.2	Shape of Windows
	3.5	Managing Multiple Windows
		3.5.1	Input Management
	3.6	Multimedia
		3.6.1	Full Motion Video
		3.6.2	Audio
	3.7	Human Considerations
		3.7.1	Unselected Window Problem
		3.7.2	Button Overload Problem
		3.7.3	Behavior Consistency Problem
		3.7.4	Window Tiling
		3.7.5	The Rooms Model
	3.8	Engineering Considerations
		3.8.1	Software Architecture
		3.8.2	Programming Style
		3.8.3	Performance Issues
		3.8.4	Evaluation Issues
	3.9	Window System Used in the Mobile Robot
	3.10	Future
4	Interaction Objects
	4.1	Interaction Objects as Abstractions
		4.1.1	Sample Interaction Objects
		4.1.2	Appearance and Behavior of Interaction Objects
		4.1.3	Relationship between Interaction Objects and the Underlying Window System
	4.2	Interaction Object Architecture
		4.2.1	Principles of the Object-Oriented Paradigm
		4.2.2	Architecture of the X Toolkit Intrinsics
		4.2.3	The Benefits of the Object-Oriented Approach
		4.2.4	The Drawbacks of the Object-Oriented Approach
		4.2.5	Non-Object-Oriented Construction Models
	4.3	Composite Objects
		4.3.1	Simple Composition
		4.3.2	Geometry Management
		4.3.3	Constraints
		4.3.4	Garnet
		4.3.5	Abstract Imaging
	4.4	Multimedia
	4.5	Human Considerations
		4.5.1	Restrictions Imposed by Toolkits
		4.5.2	Combining Different Toolkits
	4.6	Engineering Considerations
		4.6.1	Standardization
		4.6.2	Customization
		4.6.3	Application Programming Interface
		4.6.4	Evaluation Criteria
	4.7	Mobile Robot Example
	4.8	Future
5	Dialogue Control
	5.1	Definitions
		5.1.1	Dialogue Controller
		5.1.2	Application Skeletons
		5.1.3	User Interface Generators
	5.2	Requirements for Dialogue Controllers
		5.2.1	Requirements for Interleaving
		5.2.2	Requirements for the Protocol with Functional Core: API
		5.2.3	Support for General Services
	5.3	Abstract Basis of Dialogue Control
		5.3.1	Formal Grammar Models
		5.3.2	Transition Networks
		5.3.3	Production Models
	5.4	Architectural Models
		5.4.1	Monolithic Sequential Architectures
		5.4.2	Multiagent Architectures
	5.5	Human Issues
	5.6	Engineering Issues
		5.5.1	Diversity of Functionality
		5.5.2	Run-time Support
		5.5.3	From Architectural Models to Implementation
	5.7	Future
		5.7.1	Cooperative Dialogue
		5.7.2	Groupware
		5.7.3	Multimodal Interaction
6	User Interface Management Systems
	6.1	Types of Services
		6.1.1	Design Services
		6.1.2	Construction Services
		6.1.3	Evaluation Services
		6.1.4	Maintenance Services
	6.2	User Interface Generators
		6.2.1	Presentation Specification Tools
		6.2.2	Dialogue Control Specification Tools
		6.2.3	Semantic Specification Tools
	6.3	An Example: Serpent
		6.3.1	Serpent's Dialogue Specification Mechanism
		6.3.2	Serpent's Interface with the Functional Core
		6.3.3	Serpent and Toolkits
		6.3.4	Serpent with the Life Cycle
		6.3.5	Serpent and Abstract Models
	6.4	Human Issues
	6.5	Engineering Issues
	6.6	Future
		6.6.1	Interdisciplinary Efforts
		6.6.2	Improvement of Computer Science Techniques
Appendix A: A Simple Draw Program Using Xlib
	A.1	The User Interface
	A.2	Comments
Appendix B: A Simple Draw Program Using the HP Toolkit
	B.1	The User Interface
	B.2	Comments
Appendix C: A Simple Draw Program Using HyperCard
	C.1	The User Interface
	C.2	Constructing the User Interface Interactively
	C.3	Scripts
Bibliography
Index

Bookmark: B.Liungman.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Dictionary of Symbols
Author: Liungman, Carl G.
Date: 1991
Pages: 596
Publisher: Abc-Clio
Standard number: ISBN: 0-87436610-0
Keywords: icons graphics
Contents:
Ideographic dictionary
Word index
Graphic index
Graphic search index

Bookmark: B.Martin.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Doing Psychology Experiments
Author: Martin, David W.
Date: 1991
Pages: 288 + xiv
City: Pacific Grove, California
Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-534-14490-X; BF181.M315 1990
Note: Third Edition
Contents:
1. How to Make Observations
2. How to Get an Experimental Idea
3. How to Find Out What's Been Done
4. How to Decide Which Variables to Manipulate and Measure
5. How to Decide on a Within-Subject versus Between-Subjects Design
6. How to Plan a Single-Variable Experiment
7. How to Plan a Multiple-Variable Experiment
8. How to Plan Quasi-Experiments
9. How to Interpret Experimental Results
10. How to Report Experimental Results
11. How to Use Theory
12. How to Tell When You are Ready to Begin
13. How to Be Fair with Subjects
14. How to Be Fair with Science
A. How to Do Basic Statistics
B. Statistical Tables
Glossary
Index

Bookmark: B.Salkind.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Exploring Research
Author: Salkind, Neil J.
Date: 1991
Pages: 361 + xxii
City: New York
Publisher: Macmillan Publishing Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-02-405283-3; BF76.5.S24
Contents:
1. The Role and Importance of Research
2. The Research Process
3. Reviewing the Literature and Selecting a Problem
4. Measuring Behavior
5. Sampling and Generalizability
6. Methods of Measuring Behavior
7. Data Collection and Data Analysis
8. Inferential Statistics
9. Using the Personal Computer in Data Analysis
10. Historical Research
11. Conducting Descriptive Research
12. Experimental and Causal Comparative Research
13. The Process of Evaluation
14. Being a Researcher
Appendices
References
Index

Bookmark: B.McKnight.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Hypertext in Context
Series Title: Cambridge Series on Electronic Publishing
Author: McKnight, Cliff
Author: Dillon, Andrew
Author: Richardson, John
Date: 1991
Pages: 166
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-52137488-X

Bookmark: B.Horton.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Illustrating Computer Documentation: The Art of Presenting Information Graphically on Paper and Online
Author: Horton, William K.
Date: 1991
Pages: 336
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-53845-0
Contents:
The Need to Show
Visual Thinking and Creativity
Language of Graphics
Planning Graphics
Good Graphics
Showing What Things Look Like
Showing Processes and Procedures
Showing Organization
Labeling with Icons and Visual Symbols
Displaying Graphics Online
The Affective Effect of Graphics
Global Graphics
Color
Enriching Graphics
Page as Picture

Bookmark: B.OSF.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: OSF/Motif Style Guide
Author: Open Software Foundation
Date: 1991
Number of Chapters: revision 1.1 (for OSF/Motif release 1.1)
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-640616-5
Keywords: OFS/Motif Style Guidelines
Note: Superseded by revision 1.2

Bookmark: B.DeVellis.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Scale Development: Theory and Applications
Series Title: Applied Social Research Methods
Author: Devellis, Robert F.
Date: 1991
Number of Chapters: Vol. 26
Pages: 121
Publisher: Sage Publications
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8039-3776-8

Bookmark: B.Martin.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Systems Application Architecture: Common User Access
Author: Martin, James
Author: Chapman, Kathleen Kavanagh
Author: Leben, Joe
Date: 1991
Pages: 352
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-785023-9
Keywords: IBM SAA/CUA Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Heckel.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Friendly Software Design: The New Edition
Author: Heckel, Paul
Date: 1991
Pages: 319
City: Alameda, CA
Publisher: Sybex Inc.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89588-768-1, OCLC 23997264
Contents:
1	An Historical Perspective
2	Our Counterproductive Instincts
3	The Elements of Friendly Software Design
4	Designing for Innovation Acceptance
5	Seeing and Friendly Software Design
6	Prototype, Revise, and Rewrite
7	Advice to the Beginning Designer
8	The Craft of Friendly Software Design
9	The Moment of Truth
10	Works in Progress
11	Roses and Cabbages: Familiarizing and Transporting User Interface Metaphors
12	Animation, Imagination, and Friendly Software Design
13	Final Words
Afterword
Epilogue	The Wright Brothers and Software Invention
Bibliography
Index

Bookmark: B.Norman.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Psychology of Menu Selection: Designing Cognitive Control of the Human/Computer Interface
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Norman, Kent L.
Date: 1991
Pages: 352
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-553-X, OCLC 22275113
Keywords: hci-sites:books
Weblink: lap.umd.edu/POMSfolder/pomsHome.html
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/norman/menu.htm
Contents:
I: THE THEORY AND IMPLEMENTATION OF MENU SELECTION SYSTEMS (1)
1.	Introduction to the Theory of Control at the Human/Computer Interface (3)
2.	Types of Menus and Cognitive Structures (25)
3.	Tasks and Flow of Control (47)
4.	Cognitive Elements of Menu Selection (77)
II. DESIGN GUIDELINES FROM EMPIRICAL RESEARCH (113)
5.	Research Issues and Methods in Menu Selection (115)
6.	Formatting and Phrasing the Menu (126)
7.	Performance, Acquisition, and Training Methods (159)
8.	Depth versus Breadth in Hierarchical Menu Trees (189)
9.	Search Behavior in Hierarchical Menu Structures (214)
10.	Rapid Access Menus (237)
III: IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF MENU SYSTEMS (259)
11.	Clustering of Menus (261)
12.	Prototyping and Evaluation of Menu Selection Systems (281)
13.	The Future of Menu Selection (305)
References (323)
Appendix: Checklist for Menu Design with Cross-References to Sections in the Text (334)
Author Index (341)
Subject Index (345)

Bookmark: B.Bodker.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Through the Interface: A Human Activity Approach to User Interface Design
Author: Bødker, Susanne
Date: 1991
Pages: 169+ii+A17
City: Hillsdale, NJ
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-8058-0570-2, 0-8058-0571-0 (pbk.); QA 76.9 H85 B63 1990
Contents:
1.	Introduction
2.	Human Activity and Human-Computer Interaction
3.	User Interface Design: The Empirical Cases
4.	User Interfaces
5.	Methods for User Interface Design
6	User Interface Design: Advice to the Designer
Acknowledgements
Bibliography
Index
Author Index
Appendix. A Brief Description of MacWrite and Microsoft WORD

Bookmark: B.Andersen.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: A Theory of Computer Semiotics
Series Title: Cambridge Series on Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Andersen, P. B.
Date: 1990
Pages: 416
City: Cambridge, UK
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-521-39336-1
Contents:
Prologue
Introduction: Scope and Setting
Part I. Theory
Part II. Computers
Part III. Language, Work, and Design
Epilogue

Bookmark: B.Waern.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Cognitive Aspects of Computer Supported Tasks
Author: Wærn, Yvonne
Date: 1990
Pages: 327
City: Chichester, England
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-91141-0
Contents:
1.	General Introduction (1-4)
PART I: THE COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE (5-120)
Introduction (5-9)
2.	Some Basics of Cognition (10-30)
3.	Long-Term and Working Memory (31-43)
4.	Complex Information Processing (44-67)
5.	Learning Computerized Tasks (68-112)
6.	Individual Differences (113-120)
PART II: THE TASK PERSPECTIVE (121-236)
7.	A General Frame of Reference (123-144)
8.	From Ideas to Text (145-167)
9.	From Question to Answer (168-182)
10.	From Problem to Solution (183-202)
11.	From Function to Form on Computer Support in Design Engineering (203-236)
PART III: THE INTERFACE PERSPECTIVE (237-274)
Introduction (237-238)
12.	Communication Styles (241-248)
13.	Lexical and Syntactical Aspects of Communication (249-255)
14.	Physical Aspects of Communication (256-266)
15.	Metacommunication (267-274)
PART IV: THE EFFECTS PERSPECTIVE (275-306)
Introduction (277-278)
16.	Effects on Cognitive Performance (279-293)
17.	Conceptual Effects (294-306)
Refences (307-320)

Bookmark: B.Foley.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice
Author: Foley, James D.
Author: van Dam, Andries
Author: Feiner, Steven K.
Author: Hughes, John F.
Date: 1990
Pages: 1174
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-12110-7; T 385.C587
Note: 2nd Edition
Contents:
1	Introduction
2	Programming in the Simple Raster Graphics Package (SRGP)
3	Basic Raster Graphics Algorithms for Drawing 2D Primitives
4	Graphics Hardware
4.1	Hardcopy Technologies
4.2	Display Technologies
4.3	Raster-Scan Display Systems
4.4	The Video Controller
4.5	Random-Scan Display Processor
4.6	Input Devices for Operator Interaction
4.7	Image Scanners
	Exercises
5	Geometrical Transformations
6	Viewing in 3D
7	Object Hierarchy and Simple PHIGS (SPHIGS)
8	Input Devices, Interaction Techniques, and Interaction Tasks
8.1	Interaction Hardware
8.2	Basic Interaction Tasks
8.3	Composite Interaction Tasks
	Exercises
9	Dialogue Design
9.1	The Form and Content of User-Computer Dialogues
9.2	User-Interface Styles
9.3	Important Design Considerations
9.4	Modes and Syntax
9.5	Visual Design
9.6	The Design Methodology
	Exercises
10	User Interface Software
10.1	Basic Interaction-Handling Models
10.2	Window-Management Systems
10.3	Output Handling in Window Systems
10.4	Input Handling in Window Systems
10.5	Interaction-Technique Toolkits
10.6	User-Interface Management Systems
	Exercises
11	Representing Curves and Surfaces
12	Solid Modeling
13	Achromatic and Colored Light
14	The Quest for Visual Realism
15	Visible-Surface Determination
16	Illumination and Shading
17	Image Manipulation and Storage
18	Advanced Raster Graphics Architecture
19	Advanced Geometric and Raster Algorithms
20	Advanced Modeling Techniques
21	Animation
Appendix: Mathematics for Computer Graphics

Bookmark: B.Horton.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing and Writing Online Documentation: Help Files to Hypertext
Author: Horton, William K.
Date: 1990
Pages: 372
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-51399-7 0-471-50772-5 (pbk), OCLC

Bookmark: B.Powell.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing user interfaces
Author: Powell, James E.
Date: 1990
Pages: 390
Publisher: Microtrend Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-915391-40-6, OCLC 22382313

Bookmark: B.Kirakowski.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Effective Methodology for the Study of HCI
Series Title: Human Factors in Information Technology, 5
Author: Kirakowski, Jurek
Author: Corbett, Mary
Date: 1990
Pages: 363
City: Amsterdam
Publisher: North-Holland
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-444-88447-5
Contents:
1: THE PROBLEM OF METHODOLOGY (1)
1: What is Effective Methodology? (5)
2: CONCEPTUALISING THE INTERFACE (37)
2: Studying the User (41)
3: User to Interface (83)
3: INFORMED CHOICES (123)
4: Structural Framework (127)
5: Towards an Informed Choice of Method (167)
4: TECHNIQUES FOR HCI RESEARCH (201)
6: The Questionnaire (205)
7: Content Analysis (245)
8: Analysing the Data (275)
5: EMPIRICAL HCI (311)
9: The Way Forward (315)

Bookmark: B.Tufte.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Envisioning Information
Author: Tufte, Edward R.
Date: 1990
Pages: 126
City: Cheshire, Connecticut
Publisher: Graphics Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-9613921-1-8
Contents:
Escaping Flatland
Micro/Macro Readings
Layering and Separation
Small Multiples
Color and Imagination
Narratives of Space and Time
Epilogue

Bookmark: B.Reason.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Error
Author: Reason, James
Date: 1990
Pages: 302
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-521-31419-4
Contents:
1	The Nature of Error (1-18)
2	Studies of Human Error (19-52)
3	Performance Levels and Error Types (53-96)
4	Cognitive Underspecification and Error Forms (97-124)
5	A Design for a Fallible Machine (125-147)
6	The Detection of Errors (148-172)
7	Latent Errors and Systems Disasters (173-216)
8	Assessing and Reducing the Human Error Risk (217-250)
Appendix (251-257)
References (258-290)
Name Index
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Baecker.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors and Typography for More Readable Programs
Author: Baecker, Ronald M.
Author: Marcus, Aaron
Date: 1990
Pages: 366
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-10745-7, OCLC 19513113; ACM Order number 706890

Bookmark: B.Nielsen.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Hypertext and Hypermedia
Author: Nielsen, Jakob
Date: 1990
Pages: 263
City: San Diego, CA
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-518410-7; 0-12-518411-5 (pbk), OCLC 28148201; 4-8337-8583-8 (Japanese translation)
Keywords: Hypertext Hypermedia
Weblink: www.useit.com/jakob/hthmbook.html
Contents:
Preface
1.	Defining Hypertext and Hypermedia
2.	An Example of a Hypertext System
3.	The History of Hypertext
4.	Applications of Hypertext
5.	Major Current Hypertext Systems
6.	The Architecture of Hypertext Systems
7.	Hardware Support for Hypertext
8.	Navigating Large Information Spaces
9.	Hypertext Usability
10.	Writing Hypertexts
11.	Converting Existing Text to Hypertext
12.	The Future of Hypertext
Appendix A.	Some Hypertext Products and Vendors
Appendix B.	Annotated Bibliography
Index

Bookmark: B.ACM.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Resources in Human-Computer Interaction
Author: ACM
Date: 1990
Pages: 1100
City: New York, NY
Publisher: ACM Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89791-373-6; ACM Order number 219901

Bookmark: B.Vaske.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Socializing the Human-Computer Environment
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Vaske, Jerry
Author: Grantham, Charles
Date: 1990
Pages: 312
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-471-1
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/vaske/social.htm

Bookmark: B.Norman.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Design of Everyday Things
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 1990
Pages: 257
City: New York
Publisher: Doubleday
Standard number: ISBN: 0-385-26774-6
Note: Previously published as The Psychology of Everyday Things, 1988.
Contents:
1	The Psychopathology of Everyday Things
2	The Psychology of Everyday Actions
3	Knowledge in the Head and in the World
4	Knowing What to Do
5	To Err Is Human
6	The Design Challenge
7	User-Centered Design
Notes
Suggested Readings

Bookmark: B.Carroll.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Nurnberg Funnel: Designing Minimalist Instruction for Practical Computer Skill
Author: Carroll, John M.
Date: 1990
Pages: 360
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-03163-9
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl

Bookmark: B.Thimbleby.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Design
Author: Thimbleby, Harold
Date: 1990
Pages: 470
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Publisher: ACM Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-41618-2; ACM Order number 704907; QA76.9.U83T48 1990
Contents:
1	Introduction (1-16)
2	Interaction (17-30)
3	From the User (31-52)
4	Through the Interface (53-82)
5	To the Computer (83-110)
6	Easy to Use? (110-132)
7	Basic Design Problems (133-148)
8	Attitudes to Design (149-168)
9	Science (169-196)
10	Principles for Principles (197-226)
11	Modes and WYSIWYG (227-260)
12	Undo (261-286)
13	A Formal Model for Interactive Systems (287-314)
14	Mathematics (315-344)
15	Equal Opportunity (344-364)
16	An Example Design (365-390)
17	Good by Design (391-412)
18	Epilogue: What of the Future? (413-428)
19	Carrying on (429-441)
References (443-447)

Bookmark: B.Thorell.90
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Using Computer Color Effectively: An Illustrated Reference
Author: Thorell, Lisa G.
Author: Smith, Wanda J.
Date: 1990
Pages: 258
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-939878-3, OCLC 18321247
Contents:
I. COMPUTER COLOR
1. The Benefits of Computer Color
2. Displaying Computer Color
3. Transferring Color to Hard Copy
4. Color Coding
5. Computer Color Applications
II. Technical Aspects of Vision and Computer Color
6. Color Vision
7. Color Image Quality
8. Color, Visual Comfort, and Performance
9. Specification of Color
10. Manipulating Color on Displays
III. Color Application Guidelines
11. Computer Color Guidelines
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Solso.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Introduction to Experimental Design in Psychology: A Case Approach
Author: Solso, Robert L.
Author: Johnson, Homer H.
Date: 1989
Pages: 363 + xiv
City: New York
Publisher: Harper & Row
Standard number: ISBN: 0-06-046436-4; BF191.S65, BF181J67i
Note: Fourth Edition
Contents:
Part One: Basic Principles in Experimental Design
1. An Introduction to Scientific Inquiry
2. Anatomy of Experimental Design: Design Strategies
3. Anatomy of Experimental Design: Control
4. Design Critiques I
5. Control of Subject Variables
6. Design Critiques II
7. Ethics of Experimental Research
8. The Psychological Literature: Reading for Understanding and as a Source for Research Ideas
9. Conducting Research and Writing a Research Paper
Part Two: Analysis of Experiments
10. Cola Tasting
11. Picture Memory
12. Distance and Rank
13. Long-Term Memory
14. Creative Porpoise
15. Maternal Behavior
16. Humor
17. Alcohol and Perception
18. Russian Vocabulary
19. Therapy for Anger
20. Office Environments
21. Prosocial Behavior
22. Birdsong Learning
23. Note Taking
24. Weight Loss
25. Parents' Views
A. Computational Procedures for Basic Statistics
B. Statistical Tables
References
Name Index
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Booth.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Booth, Paul
Date: 1989
Pages: 268
City: Hove, UK
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-86377-123-8
Note: Reviewed in IJHCI, 3:1, 1991, 113-114

Bookmark: B.Salton.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Automatic Text Processing: The Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval of Information by Computer
Author: Salton, Gerard
Date: 1989
Pages: 530
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-12227-8; QA 76.9 T48 S25 1989
Contents:
PART 1: THE INFORMATION-PROCESSING ENVIRONMENT
1	The Information Environment
1.1	Automatic Information Processing
1.2	Types of Information
2	The Computer Environment
2.1	Computer Architecture
2.2	Storage Technology
2.3	Input-Output and Peripheral Equipment
2.4	Computer Networks
2.5	Integrated Computing Systems
3	The Automated Office
3.1	The Office Environment
3.2	Analyzing Office Systems
3.3	File-management Systems
3.4	Office Display Systems
3.5	Office-Information Retrieval
PART 2: WORD PROCESSING AND FILE ACCESS
4	Text Editing and Formatting
4.1	Introduction
4.2	Approaches to Word Processing
4.3	Text Editing and Formatting
4.4	Typical Processing Systems
4.5	Automatic Typesetting Systems
5	Text Compression
5.1	Statistical Language Characteristics
5.2	Rationale for Text Compression
5.3	Text Compression Methods
6	Text Encryption
6.1	Basic Cryptographic Concepts
6.2	Conventional Cryptographic Systems
6.3	Sample Cryptographic Ciphers
6.4	The Data Encryption Standard (DES)
6.5	Ciphers Based on Computationally Difficult Problems
7	File-Accessing Systems
7.1	Basic Concepts
7.2	Single-Key Searching: Sequential Search
7.3	Single-Key Indexed Searches
7.4	Tree Searching
7.5	Balanced Search Trees
7.6	Multiway Search Trees
7.7	Hash-Table Access
7.8	Indexed Searches for Multikey Access
7.9	Bitmap Encoding for Multikey Access
7.10	Multidimensional Access Structures
PART 3: INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS
8	Conventional Text-Retrieval Systems
8.1	Database Management and Information Retrieval
8.2	Text Retrieval Using Inverted Indexing Methods
8.3	Extensions to the Inverted Index Operations
8.4	Typical File Organization
8.5	Optimization of Inverted-List Procedures
8.6	Text-Scanning Systems
8.7	Hardware Aids to Text Searching
9	Automatic Indexing
9.1	Indexing Environment
9.2	Indexing Aims
9.3	Single-term Indexing Theories
9.4	Term Relationships in Indexing
9.5	Term-phrase Formation
9.6	Thesaurus-Group Generation
9.7	A Blueprint for Automatic Indexing
10	Advanced Information-Retrieval Models
10.1	The Vector Space Model
10.2	Automatic Document Classification
10.3	Probabilistic Retrieval Model
10.4	Extended Boolean Retrieval Model
10.5	Integrated System for Processing Text and Data
10.6	Advanced Interface Systems
PART 4: TEXT ANALYSIS AND LANGUAGE PROCESSING
11	Language Analysis and Understanding
11.1	The Linguistic Approach
11.2	Dictionary Operations
11.3	Syntactic Analysis
11.4	Knowledge-based Processing
11.5	Specialized Language Processing
12	Automatic Text Transformations
12.1	Text Transformations
12.2	Automatic Writing Aids
12.3	Automatic Abstracting Systems
12.4	Automatic Text Generation
12.5	Automatic Translation
13	Paperless Information Systems
1.1	Paperless Processing
1.2	Processing Complex Documents
1.3	Graphics Processing
1.4	Speech Processing
1.5	Automatic Teleconferencing Systems
1.6	Electronic Mail and Messages
1.7	Electronic Information Services
1.8	Electronic Publications and the Electronic Library
Author Index
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Ravden.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Evaluating Usability of Human-Computer Interfaces: A Practical Method
Author: Ravden, Susannah J.
Author: Johnson, Graham I.
Date: 1989
Pages: 126
City: Chichester, England
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-47021496-1; 0-74580614-7
Contents:
I INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND TO THE METHOD
1	The Ideas Behind the Method
2	Overview of the Method
II THE EVALUATION CHECKLIST IN DETAIL
3	The Evaluation Checklist
4	Detailed Explanations of Criterion-Based Sections
III HOW TO EVALUATE A USER INTERFACE USING THE METHOD
5	How to Construct Tasks for the Evaluation
6	How to Conduct the Evaluation
7	How to Analyse the Results of the Evaluation
Appendix: Case Studies

Bookmark: B.Suter.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Experimentation in Psychology: A Guided Tour
Author: Suter, W. Newton
Author: Lindgren, Henry Clay
Author: Hiebert, Sarah J.
Date: 1989
Pages: 507
City: Boston
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
Standard number: ISBN
Standard number: ISBN: 0-20511691-4

Bookmark: B.Bailey.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Performance Engineering: Using Human Factors/Ergonomics to Achieve Computer System Usability
Author: Bailey, Robert W.
Date: 1989
Pages: 563
City: Englewood-Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-445180-5
Note: Second edition

Bookmark: B.Jones.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interaction: A Design Guide
Author: Jones, Mark S.
Date: 1989
Pages: 150
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Educational Technology Publications
Standard number: ISBN: 0-87778-207-5

Bookmark: B.Sutcliffe.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interface Design
Author: Sutcliffe, A.
Date: 1989
Pages: 205
City: New York
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Standard number: ISBN: 0-387-91339-4

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Hypertext Hands-On! An Introduction to a New Way of Organizing and Accessing Information
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Author: Kearsley, Greg
Date: 1989
Pages: 192
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-15171-5
Note: includes two disks
Contents:
1	Essential Concepts
2	Applications
3	System Design Issues
4	Implementation Issues
5	Authoring
6	Systems
7	Personalities
8	Possibilities
9	The End is Just the Beginning
Appendix/Using the Software Version
Bibliography
Epilog/The Making of Hypertext Hands-On!
Hyper Glossary
Index

Bookmark: B.Jonassen.91
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Hypertext/Hypermedia
Author: Jonassen, David H.
Date: 1989
Pages: 91
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Educational Technology Publications
Standard number: ISBN: 0-87778-217-2

Bookmark: B.Horn.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Mapping Hypertext: Analysis, Linking and Display of Knowledge for the Next Generation of On-line Text and Graphics
Author: Horn, Robert E.
Date: 1989
Pages: 289
City: Lexington, MA
Publisher: Lexington Institute
Standard number: ISBN: 0-96255650-5

Bookmark: B.Cozby.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods in Behavioral Research
Author: Cozby, Paul C.
Date: 1989
Pages: 302 + xii
City: Mountain View, California
Publisher: Mayfield Publishing Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-97484-897-0; BF76.5.C67
Note: Fourth Edition
Contents:
1. The Scientific Method
2. Where to Start
3. Studying Behavior
4. Descriptive Methods
5. Experimental Design: Purpose and Pitfalls
6. Types of Experimental Design
7. Complex Experimental Designs
8. Conducting Research
9. Understanding Research Results
10. Correlation Coefficients
11. Generalizing Results
12. Ethical Concerns
A. Writing Research Reports
B. Statistical Tests
C. Statistical Tables
Glossary
References
Index

Bookmark: B.Sun.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: OPEN LOOK Graphical User Interface Application Style Guidelines
Author: Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Date: 1989
Pages: 388
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-52364-7
Keywords: Open Look Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Sun.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: OPEN LOOK Graphical User Interface Functional Specification
Author: Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Date: 1989
Pages: 563
City: Reading, Mass.
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-52365-5
Keywords: Open Look Style Guidelines

Bookmark: B.Brown.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Programming the User Interface: Principles and Examples
Author: Brown, Judith R.
Author: Cunningham, Steve
Date: 1989
Pages: 371
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-63843-9

Bookmark: B.Diaper.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Task Analysis for Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Diaper, Dan
Date: 1989
Pages: 258
City: Chichester, UK
Publisher: Ellis Horwood
Standard number: ISBN: 0-47021606-9

Bookmark: B.Webster.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The NeXT Book
Author: Webster, Bruce F.
Date: 1989
Pages: 387
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-15851-5, OCLC 19630859
Keywords: IMPLEMENTATION TOOL Windows Prototype

Bookmark: B.Gilmore.89
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User-Computer Interface in Process Control: A Human Factors Engineering Handbook
Author: Gilmore, Walter E.
Author: Gertman, David I.
Author: Blackman, Harold S.
Date: 1989
Pages: 436
City: San Diego, CA
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12283965-X

Bookmark: B.NASA.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Space Station Freedom Program: Human-Computer Interface Guide
Author: NASA
Date: 1988-12
Pages: 261
City: Houston, TX
Publisher: Johnson Space Center
Standard number: OCLC 1734585021
Note: Version 2.1

Bookmark: B.Myers.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Creating User Interfaces by Demonstration
Author: Myers, Brad A.
Date: 1988
Pages: 320
City: New York
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12512305-1

Bookmark: B.Dumas.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing User Interfaces for Software
Author: Dumas, Joseph S.
Date: 1988
Pages: 174
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13201971-X

Bookmark: B.Rubinstein.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Digital Typography: An Introduction to Type and Composition for Computer System Design
Author: Rubinstein, Richard
Date: 1988
Pages: 353
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-17633-5

Bookmark: B.Hendler.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Expert Systems: The User Interface
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Hendler, James A.
Date: 1988
Pages: 336
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-429-0
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/hendler/expert.htm

Bookmark: B.Brown.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human-Computer Interface Design Guidelines
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Brown, C. Marlin "Lin"
Date: 1988
Pages: 236
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 1-871516-54-4 Intellect; 0-89391-332-4 Ablex, OCLC
Keywords: DESIGN Guidelines Dialogue
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/brown/hci.htm
Contents:
1	General human-Computer Interface Concepts
2	Designing Display Formats
3	Effective Wording
4	Color
5	Graphics
6	Dialogue Design
7	Data Entry
8	Control and Display Devices
9	Error Messages and Online Assistance
10	Implementation of Human-Computer Interface Guidelines
11	References
12	Author Index
13	Subject Index
14	Guideline Checklist

Bookmark: B.Zuboff.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: In the Age of the Smart Machine: The Future of Work and Power
Author: Zuboff, Shoshana
Date: 1988
Pages: 468
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Basic Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-46503211-7

Bookmark: B.Ray.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience
Author: Ray, William J.
Author: Ravizza, Richard
Date: 1988
Pages: 373
City: Belmont, California
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53408778-7
Note: Third Edition

Bookmark: B.Kearsley.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Online Help Systems: Design and Implementation
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Kearsley, Greg
Date: 1988
Pages: 128
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-472-X
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/kearsley/online3.htm

Bookmark: B.Clegg.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: People and Computers -- How to Evaluate Your Company's New Technology
Author: Clegg, C. W.
Author: Warr, P. B.
Author: Green, T. R. G.
Author: Monk, A.
Author: Kemp, N.
Author: Allison, G.
Author: Lansdale, M.
Date: 1988
Pages: 245
City: Chichester, England
Publisher: Ellis Horwood
Standard number: ISBN: 0-470-21207-1

Bookmark: B.Norman.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Psychology of Everyday Things
Author: Norman, Donald A.
Date: 1988
Pages: 257
City: New York
Publisher: Basic Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-465-06709-3, OCLC
Standard number: TS 171.4.N67
Note: Reissued as The Design of Everyday Things, 1990, Doubleday ISBN 0-385-26774-6 (paperback)
Contents:
1	The Psychopathology of Everyday Things
2	The Psychology of Everyday Actions
3	Knowledge in the Head and in the World
4	Knowing What to Do
5	To Err Is Human
6	The Design Challenge
7	User-Centered Design
Notes
Suggested Readings

Bookmark: B.Rubin.88
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: User Interface Design for Computer Systems
Author: Rubin, Tony
Date: 1988
Pages: 195
City: Chichester, England
Publisher: Ellis Horwood
Standard number: ISBN: 0-74580299-0

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Date: 1987
Pages: 464
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-16505-8; QA 76.9.I58S47
Keywords: GENERAL Lifecycle DESIGN Task Device Psych Prototype Guidance Model EVALUATION Empirical Dialogue Guidelines
Contents:
MOTIVATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS
1	Human Factors of Interactive Software
2	Theories, Principles, and Guidelines
INTERACTION STYLES
3	Menu Selection Systems
4	Command Languages
5	Direct Manipulation
CONSIDERATIONS AND AUGMENTATIONS
6	Interaction Devices
7	Response Time and Display Rate
8	System Messages
9	Printed Manuals, Online Help, and Tutorials
ASSESSMENT AND REFLECTION
10	Iterative Design, Testing, and Evaluation
11	Social and Individual Impact

Bookmark: B.Woodson.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors Reference Guide for Electronics and Computer Professionals
Author: Woodson, W. E.
Date: 1987
Pages: 204
City: New York
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07071766-4
Keywords: DESIGN Psych

Bookmark: B.Sanders.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Engineering and Design
Author: Sanders, M. S.
Author: McCormick, Ernest J.
Date: 1987
Pages: 664
City: New York
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-044903-1
Note: Sixth Edition
Note: Superseded by Sanders & McCormick, 1993

Bookmark: B.Apple.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Interface Guidelines: The Apple Desktop Interface
Author: Apple Computer, Inc.
Date: 1987
Pages: 144
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-17753-6, OCLC 17424669
Keywords: DESIGN Guidelines Macintosh
Contents:
1	Philosophy
2	Elements of the Desktop Interface
3	Specifications
A	Roots of the Apple Desktop Interface
B	Software for International Markets
C	Recommended Reading

Bookmark: B.Coats.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Man-Computer Interfaces: An Introduction to Software Design and Implementation
Author: Coats, R. B.
Author: Vlaeminke, I.
Date: 1987
Pages: 381
City: Oxford, UK
Publisher: Blackwell Scientific Publications
Standard number: ISBN: 0-63201542-X

Bookmark: B.Suchman.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human-Computer Communication
Author: Suchman, Lucy A.
Date: 1987
Pages: 203+xiv
City: New York
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-521-33137-4 0-521-33739-9 (pbk), OCLC 15429358; T 59.7.S83
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 Interactive Artifacts
3 Plans
4 Situated Actions
5 Communicative Resources
6 Case and Methods
7 Human-Machine Communication
8 Conclusion

Bookmark: B.Goodman.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Complete HyperCard Handbook
Author: Goodman, Danny
Date: 1987
Pages: 720
City: New York
Publisher: Bantam
Standard number: ISBN: 0-553-34391-2
Keywords: DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION TOOL Prototype Macintosh
Contents:
I	Browsing Through HyperCard
II	HyperCard's Authoring Environment
III	HyperCard's Programming Environment
IV	Applying HyperCard and HyperTalk

Bookmark: B.Nickerson.87
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Using Computers: Human Factors in Information Systems
Author: Nickerson, Raymond S.
Date: 1987
Pages: 434
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-64022-8 (paper) 0-262-14040-3 (cloth), 12692789; QA 76.N497
Keywords: GENERAL DESIGN
Note: A Bradford Book
Weblink: mitpress.mit.edu/book-home.tcl
Contents:
1	Introduction
2	Backdrop
3	Uses and Users of Information Systems
4	Anticipated Developments
5	The Study of Person-Computer Interaction
6	The Physical Interface
7	The Cognitive Interface
8	Software Tools
9	Communication and Information Services
10	Information Technology and Jobs
11	Information Systems in the Office
12	Designing Interactive Systems
13	Some User Issues
14	Programming
15	Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems
16	Some Research Challenges
17	Quality of Life: The Fundamental Issue
18	A Perspective

Bookmark: B.Meister.86
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors Evaluation and Testing
Author: Meister, D.
Date: 1986
Pages: 424
City: Amsterdam
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-44442701-5

Bookmark: B.Harter.86
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Online Information Retrieval: Concepts, Principles, and Techniques
Author: Harter, Stephen P.
Date: 1986
Pages: 259
City: San Diego, CA
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-328456-2

Bookmark: B.Winograd.86
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Understanding Computers and Cognition
Author: Winograd, Terry
Author: Flores, Fernando
Date: 1986
Pages: 207
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-050-3, OCLC 11727403
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/winograd/design2.htm

Bookmark: B.Brockman.86
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Writing Better Computer User Documentation: From Paper to Online
Author: Brockmann, R. John
Date: 1986
Pages: 289
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-88472-3

Bookmark: B.Meister.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Behavioral Analysis and Measurement Methods
Author: Meister, D.
Date: 1985
Pages: 509
City: New York
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-89640-3

Bookmark: B.Spencer.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer Usability Testing and Evaluation
Author: Spencer, Richard H.
Date: 1985
Pages: 224
City: Englewood-Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-164088-7
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 Usability Mission
3 Product, User, and Evaluator
4 Product and Evaluation Planning Cycles
5 Usability Documentation
6 Criteria -- Qualitative and Quantitative
7 Evaluating Usability
8 Data and Reporting
A Checklist of Usability Considerations for Computer Design Evaluations
B Usability Test Plan -- Example
C Human Factors Considerations -- Examples
D Standards

Bookmark: B.Oborne.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computers at Work: A Behavioural Approach
Author: Oborne, David J.
Date: 1985
Pages: 420
City: Chichester, England
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-47190410-4

Bookmark: B.Galitz.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Handbook of Screen Format Design
Author: Galitz, Wilbert O.
Date: 1985
Pages: 250
City: P. O. Box 181, Wellesley, MA 02181
Publisher: Q. E. D. Information Sciences Inc.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89435-119-2
Keywords: DESIGN Display Prototype
Note: Revised Edition
Note: Superseded by "User-Interface Screen Design," 1993
Contents:
1	Introduction
2	Important General Considerations
3	Considerations in Screen Design
4	Data Entry Screens
5	Inquiry Screens
6	Interactive Screens
7	Menu Screens
8	Color in Screen Design
9	Source Documents
10	Screen Design Steps

Bookmark: B.Weiss.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: How to Write a Usable User Manual
Author: Weiss, Edmond H.
Date: 1985
Pages: 197
City: Philadelphia, PA
Publisher: ISI Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89495052-5 (paper) 0-89495051-7 (hard)

Bookmark: B.Ray.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Methods Toward a Science of Behavior and Experience
Author: Ray, W. J.
Author: Ravizza, R.
Date: 1985
Pages: 414
City: Belmont, California
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53404041-1
Note: Second Edition

Bookmark: B.AERA.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing
Author: AERA, APA, and NCEA
Date: 1985
Pages: 100
City: Washington, DC
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Standard number: ISBN: 0-912704-95-0
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
I	TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR TEST CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION
1	Validity
2	Reliability and Errors of Measurement
3	Test Development and Revision
4	Scaling, Norming, Score Comparability, and Equating
5	Test Publication: Technical Manuals and User's Guides
II	PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS FOR TEST USE
6	General Principles of Test Use
7	Clinical Testing
8	Educational Testing and Psychological Testing in the Schools
9	Test Use In Counseling
10	Employment Testing
11	Professional and Occupational Licensure and Certification
12	Program Evaluation
III	STANDARDS FOR PARTICULAR APPLICATIONS
13	Testing Linguistic Minorities
14	Testing People Who Have Handicapping Conditions
IV	Standards for Administrative Procedures
15	Test Administration, Scoring, and Reporting
16	Protecting the Rights of Test Takers
Glossary

Bookmark: B.Cleveland.85
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Graphing Data
Author: Cleveland, William S.
Date: 1985
Pages: 323
City: Monterey, California
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-534-03730-5; QA 90.C54
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
1	Introduction
2	Principles of Graph Construction
3	Graphical Methods
4	Graphical Perception

Bookmark: B.Solso.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: An Introduction to Experimental Design in Psychology: A Case Approach
Author: Solso, R. L.
Author: Johnson, H. H.
Date: 1984
Pages: 285
City: New York
Publisher: Harper & Row
Standard number: ISBN: 0-06-043414-7; BF 191.S65
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Note: 3rd Edition
Contents:
1	An Introduction to Scientific Inquiry
2	Anatomy of Experimental Design: Design Strategies
3	Anatomy of Experimental Design: Control
4	Design Critiques
5	Control of Subject Variables
6	Design Critiques
7	Ethics of Experimental Research

Bookmark: B.Wickens.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
Author: Wickens, Christopher D.
Date: 1984
Pages: 513
City: Columbus, OH
Publisher: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Co.
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67520156-X; 0-67318663-6
Keywords: DESIGN Psych
Contents:
1	Introduction to Engineering Psychology and Human Performance
2	Signal Detection and Absolute Judgment
3	Decision Making
4	Perception of Verbal Material
5	Nonverbal Perception
6	Memory
7	Attention and Perception
8	Attention, Time-Sharing, and Workload
9	Selection of Action
10	Serial Reaction Time, Transcriptions, and Errors
11	Continuous Manual Control
12	Process Control and Automation

Bookmark: B.Price.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: How to Write a Computer Manual
Author: Price, Jonathan
Date: 1984
Pages: 295
City: Menlo Park, CA
Publisher: Benjamin/Cummings Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-80536870-1

Bookmark: B.Hiltz.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Online Communities: A Case Study of the Office of the Future
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Hiltz, Starr Roxanne
Date: 1984
Pages: 256
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-145-3 (cloth); 0-89391-374-X (paper)
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/hiltz/online2.htm

Bookmark: B.Ericsson.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Protocol Analysis: Verbal Reports as Data
Author: Ericsson, K. A.
Author: Simon, H. A.
Date: 1984
Pages: 426
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-55012-1; BF 455.E68
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-05029-3, OCLC 10207167
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
1	Introduction and Summary
2	Effects of Verbalization
3	Completeness of Reports
4	Inferences From Verbal Data
5	Model of Verbalization
6	Methods for Protocol Analysis
7	Techniques of Protocol Analysis

Bookmark: B.Fleishman.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Taxonomies of Human Performance: The Description of Human Tasks
Author: Fleishman, E. A.
Author: Quaintance, M. K.
Date: 1984
Pages: 514
City: New York
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-260450-4; OCLC 10737935
Keywords: DESIGN Task
Contents:
1	The Need for Taxonomic Development in the Field of Human Performance
2	Role of Taxonomics in Scientific Development
3	Conceptual Bases for Classifying Human Task Performance
4	Methodological Issues in Developing and Evaluating Classificatory Systems
5	Classificatory Systems for Describing Human Tasks: Behavior Description
6	Classificatory Systems for Describing Human Tasks: Behavior Requirements
7	Classificatory Systems for Describing Human Tasks: Abilities and Task Characteristics
8	Data Bases and Taxonomic Development
9	The Criterion Measures Approach
10	The Information-Theoretic Approach
11	The Task Strategies Approach
12	The Ability Requirements Approach
13	The Task Characteristics Approach
14	Taxonomic Developments in Related Areas
15	Conclusions
A	Miller's Terminology: Definitions for the 25 Task Functions Involved in a Generalized Information-Processing System
B	Updated Definitions for the Ability Categories in Recent Forms of the Manual for the Ability Requirements Scales (MARS)
C	Tasks Representing Different Ability Categories
D	Task Characteristic Rating Scales

Bookmark: B.Heckel.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Friendly Software Design
Author: Heckel, Paul
Date: 1984
Pages: 205
City: New York
Publisher: Warner Books
Standard number: ISBN: 0-44638040-7

Bookmark: B.Rubinstein.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Human Factor: Designing Computer Systems for People
Author: Rubinstein, Richard
Author: Hersh, Harry
Date: 1984
Pages: 249
City: Maynard, MA
Publisher: Digital Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-932376-44-4; QA 76.9 S88 R83 1984
Keywords: DESIGN Task
Note: With the Assistance of Henry Ledgard
Contents:
1	Why Human Factors?
2	Design Philosophy
3	Task Analysis and Use Models
4	Starting a Design
5	Conceptual Models
6	Language
7	The Other Kind of Software
8	Human Interface Styles
9	Responding to Users
10	Presentation and Representation
11	Testing Systems
12	Parting Thoughts

Bookmark: B.Bolt.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Human Interface: Where People and Computers Meet
Author: Bolt, Richard A.
Date: 1984
Pages: 113
City: Belmont, CA
Publisher: Lifelong Learning Publications
Standard number: ISBN: 0-53403380-6 (hdbk) 0-53403387-3 (pbk)

Bookmark: B.Turkle.84
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit
Author: Turkle, Sherry
Date: 1984
Pages: 362
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67146848-0; 0-67160602-6

Bookmark: B.Mumford.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Designing Human Systems for New Technology
Author: Mumford, Enid
Date: 1983
Pages: 108
City: Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB, England
Publisher: Manchester Business School
Standard number: ISBN: 0-90380828-5

Bookmark: B.Bailey.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Error in Computer Systems
Author: Bailey, Robert W.
Date: 1983
Pages: 146
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13445056-6
Keywords: DESIGN
Contents:
1	Designing to Reduce Errors
2	Measuring Errors
3	Error Sources
4	Error Prevention
5	System Design Factors
6	Written Instruction
7	Training Factors
8	Human/Computer Interface Factors
9	Environmental Factors
10	Organizational Accuracy Requirements
11	Personal Factors
12	Error Detection
13	Error Correction

Bookmark: B.Kantowitz.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors: Understanding People-System Relationships
Author: Kantowitz, Barry H.
Author: Sorkin, Robert D.
Date: 1983
Pages: 699
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-09594-X; TA 166.K365; OCLC 8866672
Keywords: GENERAL Task DESIGN Psych EVALUATION
Contents:
INTRODUCTION
1	Systems and People
2	Error and Reliability
HUMAN CAPABILITIES
3	Hearing and Signal Detection Theory
4	Vision
5	Psychomotor Skill
6	Human Information Processing
HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACES
7	Visual Displays (by J. R. Buck)
8	Auditory and Tactile Displays
9	Speech Communication
10	Controls and Tools
11	Data Entry (by H. E. Dunsmore)
HUMAN-MACHINE SYSTEM PROPERTIES
12	Feedback and Control (by B. H. Kantowitz and J. R. Buck)
13	Human Factors in Computer Programming (by H. E. Dunsmore)
14	Decision Making with Applications to Inspection and Maintainability (by J. R. Buck and B. H. Kantowitz)
15	Workspace Design
ENVIRONMENT
16	Noise
17	Microenvironments
18	Macroenvironments
19	Environmental Stressors
20	Legal Aspects of Human Factors

Bookmark: B.Salton.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Introduction to Modern Information Retrieval
Author: Salton, Gerard
Author: McGill, Michael J.
Date: 1983
Pages: 448
City: New York
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-054484-0; Z699 S313
Contents:
1	Information Retrieval: An Introduction
0	Preview
1	Overview
2	Changing Technology
3	Information System Types
4	Functional Approach to Information Retrieval
5	Simple File Structures
2	Systems Based on Inverted Files
0	Preview
1	General Considerations
2	Adjacency and Term Frequency Features
3	Commercial Inverted File Systems
4	Enhancements of Basic Retrieval Strategy
3	Text Analysis and Automatic Indexing
0	Preview
1	Indexing Environment
2	Manual and Automatic Indexing
3	Automatic term Extraction and Weighting
4	A Simple Automatic Indexing Process
5	Automatic Term Association and Use of Context
6	Some Theoretical Approaches
7	Automatic Indexing Experiments
4	The SMART and SIRE Experimental Retrieval Systems
0	Preview
1	Introduction
2	The SMART System Environment
3	SMART System Procedures
4	Automatic Enhancements of Conventional Retrieval
5	Retrieval Evaluation
0	Preview
1	Introduction
2	Evaluation of Retrieval Effectiveness
3	Measures of Retrieval Effectiveness
4	Evaluation of System Cost and Efficiency
6	Retrieval Refinements
0	Preview
1	Introduction
2	Vector Similarity Functions
3	Term Weighting Systems
4	File Clustering
5	Dynamic Query Adjustment
6	Citation Processing
7	Natural Language Processing
0	Preview
1	Components of Natural Language Systems
2	Language Processing and Information Retrieval
3	Syntactic Analysis Systems
4	Syntactic Analysis in Information Retrieval
5	Linguistic Methods in Question Answering
8	Access to Information: Hardware and Software Approaches
0	Preview
1	Conventional Storage Devices
2	Hardware Enhancements to Retrieval
3	Text Access Methods
9	Data Management Systems
0	Preview
1	Types of Information Systems
2	The Structure of Data Base Management Systems
3	Query Processing
4	Data Quality
10	Future Directions in Information Retrieval
0	Preview
1	Introduction
2	Technological Development
3	Information Theories and Models
4	Advanced Information System
5	Conclusion
Indexes
Name Index
Subject Index

Bookmark: B.Duffy.93
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Online Help: Design and Evaluation
Series Title: Human/Computer Interaction Series
Author: Duffy, Thomas M.
Author: Palmer, James E.
Author: Mehlenbacher, Brad
Date: 1983
Pages: 272
City: Norwood, NJ
Publisher: Ablex Publishing
Publisher: Intellect
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89391-858-X (cloth); 0-89391-848-2 (paper)
Weblink: www.intellectbooks.com/authors/duffy/online1.htm
Contents:
1. Online Help in Context
2. Medium of Delivery and the Design Process
3. A Task Model for Online Help
4. Designing Interactive Help Systems
5. Understanding the Design Process
6. An Overview of Evaluation Requirements and Options
7. The Help Design Evaluation Questionnaire (HDEQ)
8. Findings from the Evaluation of Help Systems
Appendix: The Help Design Evaluation Questionnaire

Bookmark: B.NRC.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Research Needs for Human Factors
Author: National Research Council, Committee on Human Factors
Date: 1983
Pages: 160
City: Washington, DC
Publisher: National Academy Press

Bookmark: B.Anderson.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Architecture of Cognition
Author: Anderson, John R.
Date: 1983
Pages: 345
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-67404425-8

Bookmark: B.Card.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction
Author: Card, Stuart K.
Author: Moran, Thomas P.
Author: Newell, Allen
Date: 1983
Pages: 469
City: Hillsdale, NJ
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Standard number: ISBN: 0-89859243-7 (pbk) 0-89859859-1 (hdbk); OCLC 9042220
Keywords: GENERAL DESIGN Psych EVALUATION Model Theory
Contents:
1	An Applied Information-Processing Psychology
SCIENCE BASE
2	The Human Information-Processor
TEXT-EDITING
3	System and User Variability
4	An Exercise in Task Analysis
5	The GOMS Model of Manuscript Editing
6	Extensions of the GOMS Analysis
7	Models of Devices for Text Selection
ENGINEERING MODELS
8	The Keystroke-Level Model
9	The Unit-Task Level of Analysis
EXTENSIONS AND GENERALIZATIONS
10	An Exploration into Circuit Design
11	Cognitive Skill
12	Applying Psychology to Design
13	Reprise

Bookmark: B.Tufte.83
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Visual Display of Quantitative Information
Author: Tufte, Edward R.
Date: 1983
Pages: 197
City: Cheshire, CT
Publisher: Graphics Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-9613921-0-X
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
I	GRAPHICAL PRACTICE
1	Graphical Excellence
2	Graphical Integrity
3	Source of Graphical Integrity and Sophistication
II	THEORY OF DATA GRAPHICS
4	Data-Ink and Graphical Redesign
5	Chartjunk: Vibrations, Grids, and Ducks
6	Data-Ink Maximization and Graphical Design
7	Multifunctioning Graphical Elements
8	Data Density and Small Multiples
9	Aesthetics and Technique in Data Graphical Design
Epilogue: Designs for the Display of Information

Bookmark: B.APA.82
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Ethical Principles in the Conduct of Research with Human Participants
Author: APA
Date: 1982
Pages: 76
City: Washington, DC
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Standard number: ISBN: 0-91270482-9
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
APA Ethical Principle 9: Research with Human Participants
I	Background and Methodology of the Development of the Ethical Principles
II	Introduction and Summary Statement
III	Explication of the Principles

Bookmark: B.Foley.82
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Fundamentals of Interactive Computer Graphics
Author: Foley, James D.
Author: Van Dam, Andries
Date: 1982
Pages: 664
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-201-14468-9; T 385.F63
Keywords: DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION
Contents:
1	What is Interactive Graphics?
2	Basic Interactive Graphics Programming
3	Graphics Hardware
4	Implementation of a Simple Graphics Package
5	Interaction Devices and Techniques
6	The Design of User-Computer Graphic Conversations
7	Geometrical Transformations
8	Viewing in Three Dimensions
9	Modeling and Object Hierarchy
10	Advanced Display Architecture
11	Raster Algorithms and Software
12	Display Architecture
13	Representation of 3D Shapes
14	The Quest for Visual Realism
15	Algorithms for Removing Hidden Edges and Surfaces
16	Shading Models
17	Intensity and Color

Bookmark: B.McCormick.82
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Engineering and Design
Author: McCormick, Ernest J.
Author: Sanders, M. S.
Date: 1982
Pages: 615
City: New York, NY
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07044902-3
Note: Superseded by Sanders & McCormick, 1993

Bookmark: B.Bailey.82
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Performance Engineering: A Guide for System Designers
Author: Bailey, Robert W.
Date: 1982
Pages: 656
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-445320-4, OCLC 8399247; TA 166.B33
Keywords: GENERAL DESIGN Task Psych EVALUATION
Contents:
Introduction
1	Psychology and Systems
2	History of Human Performance
The Human (User)
3	Human Limits and Differences
4	Sensing
5	The Body and Performance
6	Cognitive Processing and Performance
7	Perception, Problem Solving and Decision Making
8	Memory
9	Motivation
The Activity -- Basic Design
10	Designing for People
11	Basic Design
The Activity -- Interface Design
12	Displays, Controls, and Workplace Design
13	Speech Communication
14	Human/Computer Interface
15	Forms and CRT Screen Design
16	Code Design
The Activity -- Facilitator Design
17	Supporting Human Performance
18	Selection Criteria
19	Printed Instructions
20	Performance Aids
21	Training Development
The Context (Environment)
22	Physical and Social Environments
Tests and Studies
23	Data Collection
24	Performance Testing
25	Conducting Comparison Studies

Bookmark: B.Felker.81
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Guidelines for Document Designers
Author: Felker, Daniel B.
Author: Pickering, Frances
Author: Charrow, Veda
Author: Holland, V. Melissa
Author: Redish, Janice
Date: 1981
Pages: 117
City: 1055 Thomas Jefferson Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007
Publisher: American Institutes for Research
Standard number: Report CS 207 188
Keywords: IMPLEMENTATION Guidance
Contents:
I	Introduction
II	Document Design Guidelines
A	Principles of Organizing Text
B	Principles of Writing Sentences
C	Typographic Principles
D	Graphic Principles
III	Document Design Research

Bookmark: B.Mehlmann.81
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: When People Use Computers: An Approach to Developing an Interface
Author: Mehlmann, Marilyn
Date: 1981
Pages: 142
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-956219-2

Bookmark: B.Galitz.80
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Factors in Office Automation
Author: Galitz, Wilbert O.
Date: 1980
Pages: 237
City: 100 Colony Square, Atlanta, GA 30361
Publisher: Life Office Management Association
Standard number: OCLC 7366628

Bookmark: B.Schiff.80
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Perception: An Applied Approach
Author: Schiff, W.
Date: 1980
Pages: 493
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Standard number: ISBN: 0-39527054-5

Bookmark: B.Shneiderman.80
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Software Psychology: Human Factors in Computer and Information Systems
Author: Shneiderman, Ben
Date: 1980
Pages: 320
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: Winthrop
Standard number: ISBN: 0-87626-816-5, OCLC
Standard number: QA 76.6.S543
Keywords: DESIGN EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
1	Motivation for a Psychological Approach
2	Research Methods
3	Programming as Human Performance
4	Programming Style
5	Software Quality Evaluation
6	Team Organization and Group Processes
7	Database Systems and Data Models
8	Database Query and Manipulation Languages
9	Natural Language
10	Interactive Interface Issues
11	Designing Interactive Systems
12	Computer Power To, Of, and By the People

Bookmark: B.Cakir.80
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Visual Display Terminals: A Manual Covering Ergonomics Workplace Design, Health and Safety, Task Organization
Author: Cakir, A.
Author: Hart, D. J.
Author: Stewart, T. F. M.
Date: 1980
Pages: 253
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-27793-2, OCLC 5793141

Bookmark: B.Kowalski.97
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Information Retrieval Systems
Series Title: Kluwer International Series on Information Retrieval
Author: Kowalski, Gerald
Date: 1979
Pages: 296
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Standard number: ISBN: 0-7923-9926-9
Contents:
1 Introduction to Information Processing Systems
	1.1 Definition of Information Retrieval System
	1.2 Objectives of Information Retrieval Systems
	1.3 Functional Overview
		1.3.1 Item Normalization
		1.3.2 Selective Dissemination of Information
		1.3.3 Document Database Search
		1.3.4 Index Database Search
	1.4 Relationship to Database: Management System
	1.5 Digital Libraries and Data Warehouses
	1.6 Summary
2 Information Retrieval System Capabilities
	2.1 Search Capabilities
		2.1.1 Boolean Logic
		2.1.2 Proximity
		2.1.3 Contiguous Word Phrases
		2.1.4 Fuzzy Searches
		2.1.5 Term Masking
		2.1.6 Numeric and Date Ranges
		2.1.7 Concept and Thesaurus Expansions
		2.1.8 Natural Language Queries
	2.2 Browse Capabilities
		2.2.1 Ranking
		2.2.2 Zoning
		2.2.3 Highlighting
	2.3 Miscellaneous Capabilities
		2.3.1 Vocabulary Browse
		2.3.2 Iterative Search and Search History Logs
		2.3.3 Canned Query
	2.4 Standards
		2.4.1 Z39.50 Standard and WAIS
		2.4.2 Architecture Standards
	2.5 Summary
3. Cataloging and Indexing
	3.1 History and Objectives of Indexing
		3.1.1 History
		3.1.2 Objectives
	3.2 Indexing Process
		3.2.1 Scope of Indexing
		3.2.2 Precoordination and Linkages
	3.3 Automatic Indexing
		3.3.1 Indexing by Term
		3.3.2 Indexing by Concept
	3.4 Information Extraction
	3.5 Summary
4. Data Structures
	4.1 Introduction to Data Structure
	4.2 Stemming Algorithms
		4.1.1 Introduction to the Stemming Process
		4.1.2 Porter Algorithm
		4.1.3 Dictionary Look-up Stemmers
		4.1.4 Successor Stemmers
		4.1.5 Conclusions
	4.3 Inverted File Structure
	4.4 N-Gram Data Structure
		4.4.1 History
		4.4.2 N-Gram Architecture
	4.5 PAT Data Structure
	4.6 Signature File Structure
	4.7 Hypertext Data Structure
		4.7.1 Definition of Hypertext Structure
		4.7.2 Hypertext History
	4.8 Summary
5. Automatic Indexing
	5.1 Classes of Automatic Indexing
	5.2 Statistical Indexing
		5.2.1 Probabilistic Weighting
		5.2.2 Vector Weighting
			5.2.2.1 Simple Term Frequency Algorithm
			5.2.2.2 Inverse Document Frequency
			5.2.2.3 Signal Weighting
			5.2.2.4 Discrimination Value
			5.2.2.5 Problems With Weighting Schemes
			5.2.2.6 Problems With the Vector Model
		5.2.3 Baysean Model
	5.3 Natural Language
		5.3.1 Index Phrase Generation
		5.3.2 Natural Language Processing
	5.4 Concept Indexing
	5.5 Hypertext Linkages
	5.6 Summary
6. Document and Term Clustering
	6.1 Introduction to Clustering
	6.2 Thesaurus Generation
		6.2.1 Manual Clustering
		6.2.2 Automatic Term Clustering
			6.2.2.1 Complete Term Relation Method
			6.2.2.2 Clustering Using Existing Clusters
		6.2.2.3 One Pass Assignments
	6.3 Item Clustering
	6.4 Hierarchy of Clusters
	6.5 Summary
7. User Search Techniques
	7.1 Search Statements and Binding
	7.2 Similarity Measures and Ranking
		7.2.1 Similarity Measures
		7.2.2 Ranking Algorithms
	7.3 Relevance Feedback
	7.4 Selective Dissemination of Information Search
	7.5 Weighted Searches of Boolean Systems
	7.6 Searching the Internet and Hypertext
	7.7 Summary
8. Information Visualization
	8.1 Introduction to Information Visualization
	8.2 Cognition and Perception
		8.2.1 Background
		8.2.2 Aspects of Visualization Process
	8.3 Information Visualization Technologies
	8.4 Summary
9. Text Search Algorithms
	9.1 Introduction to Text Search Techniques
	9.2 Software Text Search Algorithms
	9.3 Hardware Text Search Systems
	9.4 Summary
10. Information System Evaluation
	10.1 Introduction to Information System Evaluation
	10.2 Measures Used in System Evaluations
	10.3 Measurement Example - TREC Results
	10.4 Summary

Bookmark: B.Strunk.79
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Elements of Style
Author: Strunk, William, Jr.
Author: White, E. B.
Date: 1979
Pages: 92+xvii
City: New York
Publisher: Macmillan Publishing Company
Standard number: ISBN: 0-02-418190-0 0-02-418200-1 (pbk); PE 1408.S772
Keywords: IMPLEMENTATION Guidance
Note: 3rd Edition

Bookmark: B.Guilford.78
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education
Author: Guilford, J. P.
Author: Fruchter, B.
Date: 1978
Pages: 545
City: New York
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Standard number: ISBN: 0-07-125150-9; HA 29.G9
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Note: 6th Edition
Contents:
1	Introduction for Students
BASIC DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
2	Counting and Measuring
3	Frequency Distributions
4	Measures of Central Value
5	Measures of Variability
6	Correlation
STATISTICAL TESTS AND DECISIONS
7	Probability and Mathematical Distributions
8	Statistical Estimations and Inferences
9	Significance of Differences
10	Hypothesis Testing
11	Chi Square
12	Nonparametric, or Distribution Free, Statistics
13	Analysis of Variance
RELATIONS AND PREDICTIONS
14	Special Correlation Methods and Problems
15	Prediction and Accuracy of Prediction
16	Multiple Prediction
PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS
17	Reliability of Measurements
18	Validity of Measurements
19	Test Scales and Norms

Bookmark: B.Tichauer.78
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Biomechanical Basis of Ergonomics
Author: Tichauer, E. R.
Date: 1978
Pages: 99
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-03644-7

Bookmark: B.Hiltz.78
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Network Nation: Human Communication via Computer
Author: Hiltz, Starr Roxanne
Author: Turoff, Murray
Date: 1978
Pages: 528
City: Reading, MA
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-20103140-X 0-20103141-8

Bookmark: B.Lindsay.77
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Information Processing: An Introduction to Psychology
Author: Lindsay, P. H.
Author: Norman, D. A.
Date: 1977
Pages: 777
City: New York
Publisher: Academic Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-12-540960-6; BF 455.L494
Keywords: DESIGN Psych
Note: 2nd Edition
Contents:
PERCEPTION
1	Human Perception
2	The Visual System
3	The Dimensions of Vision
4	The Auditory System
5	The Dimensions of Sound
6	Neural Information Processing
7	Pattern Recognition and Attention
MEMORY
8	The Memory Systems
9	Using Memory
10	The Representation of Knowledge
11	The Neural Basis of Memory
THINKING
12	Language
13	Learning and Cognitive Development
14	Problem Solving and Decision Making
15	The Mechanisms of Thought
SOCIAL & PERSONALITY
16	Social Interactions
17	Stress and Emotion
A	Measuring Psychological Variables
B	Operating Characteristics

Bookmark: B.Weizenbaum.76
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Computer Power and Human Reason
Author: Weizenbaum, Joseph
Date: 1976
Pages: 300
City: San Francisco, CA
Publisher: Freeman
Standard number: ISBN: 0-71670463-3

Bookmark: B.Roebuck.75
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Engineering Anthropometry Methods
Author: Roebuck, John A.
Author: Kroemer, K. H. E.
Author: Thomson, Walter Gary
Date: 1975
Pages: 459
City: New York, NY
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Standard number: ISBN: 0-471-72975-2

Bookmark: B.Campbell.74
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Flaws and Fallacies in Statistical Thinking
Author: Campbell, S. K.
Date: 1974
Pages: 200
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-322214-4
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
1	Dangers of Statistical Ignorance
2	Some Basic Measurement and Definition Problems
3	Meaningless Statistics
4	Far Fetched Estimates
5	Cheating Charts
6	Accommodating Averages
7	Ignoring Dispersion
8	Puffing up a Point with Percents
9	Improper Comparisons
10	Jumping to Conclusions
11	Faulty Thinking About Probability
12	Faulty Induction
13	Relationships: Causal and Casual
14	Leftovers
15	Assorted Examples to Think About

Bookmark: B.Sheridan.74
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Man-Machine Systems: Information, Control, and Decision Models of Human Performance
Author: Sheridan, Thomas B.
Author: Ferrel, William R.
Date: 1974
Pages: 452
City: Cambridge, MA
Publisher: MIT Press
Standard number: ISBN: 0-262-19118-0; 0-262-69072-1

Bookmark: B.Martin.73
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Design of Man-Computer Dialogues
Author: Martin, James
Date: 1973
Pages: 559
City: Englewood Cliffs, NJ
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Standard number: ISBN: 0-13-201251-0
Contents:
I.	INTRODUCTION
1.	The Information Windows
2.	Design Methodology
3.	Categories of Terminal Operators
II.	ALPHANUMERIC DIALOGUES
4.	Natural Language Dialogue
5.	Dialogue with Programming
6.	Man-Machine Dialogues on Commercial Systems
7.	Twenty-Three Techniques for Alphanumeric Keyboard Displays
8.	Control Functions
9.	Should it be Built into the Hardware?
10.	Dialogue with a Light Pen
11.	Computer Data Entry
III. DIALOGUES WITH SOUND AND GRAPHICS
12.	The Use of Pictures
13.	Interactive Graphics
14.	Graphics for Design Work
15.	Symbolic Representation in Graphics
16.	Voice Answerback Systems
IV.	PSYCHOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
17.	User Psychology
18.	Response Time Requirements
19.	Human Channel and Buffer Capacity
20.	The Creative Operator
21.	Display Encoding
V. OPERATORS WITHOUT TRAINING
22.	The Totally Naive Operator
23.	The Untrained Operator
24.	Computer Assisted Instruction
25.	Information Control Rooms
26.	Terminals for Management
VI. IMPLEMENTATION CONSIDERATIONS
27.	Control of User Errors
28.	When Failures Occur
29.	Severity and Privacy
30.	Dialogue Program Generators
31.	Bullet-Proofing
32.	Simulation of the Man-Machine Interface
Appendix. A Psychiatrist Talks to Eliza
Class Problems
Index

Bookmark: B.Weinberg.71
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Psychology of Computer Programming
Author: Weinberg, Gerald M.
Date: 1971
Pages: 288
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Van Nostrand-Reinhold
Standard number: ISBN: 0-442-29264-3; ISBN: 0-442-20764-6 (PPBK)
Contents:
I	PROGRAMMING AS HUMAN PERFORMANCE
1	Reading Programs
2	What Makes a Good Program?
3	How Can We Study Programming?
II	PROGRAMMING AS A SOCIAL ACTIVITY
4	The Programming Group
5	The Programming Team
6	The Programming Project
III	PROGRAMMING AS AN INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY
7	Variations in the Programming Task
8	Personality Factors
9	Intelligence, or Problem-Solving Ability
10	Motivation, Training, and Experience
IV	PROGRAMMING TOOLS
11	Programming Languages
12	Some Principles for Programming Language Design
13	Other Programming Tools
V	EPILOGUE
Index

Bookmark: B.Fitts.67
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Human Performance
Author: Fitts, Paul
Author: Posner, Michael I.
Date: 1967
Pages: 162
City: Belmont, CA
Publisher: Brooks/Cole Publishing
Standard number: ISBN: 0-31321245-7
Keywords: DESIGN Psych Device
Contents:
1	Skills of Civilized Man
2	Learning and Skilled Performance
3	Motivation and Performance
4	Component Processes and Performance Capabilities
5	The Measurement of Skills
6	Human Capacities in Perceptual-Motor Skills
7	Language Skills
8	Applications

Bookmark: B.Dreyfus.67
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: The Measure of Man: Human Factors in Design
Author: Dreyfus, W.
Date: 1967
Pages: 54
City: New York, NY
Publisher: Whitney Library of Design
Standard number: ISBN: 0-82307370-X
Note: Second Edition

Bookmark: B.Campbell.63
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs for Research
Author: Campbell, D.
Author: Stanley, J.
Date: 1963
Pages: 84
City: Chicago
Publisher: Rand-McNally
Standard number: ISBN: 0-39530787-2

Bookmark: B.Huff.54
Type: AUTHORED BOOK
Title: How to Lie with Statistics
Author: Huff, Darrell
Date: 1954
Pages: 142
City: New York
Publisher: Norton
Standard number: ISBN: 0-39309426-X 0-39331072-8 (reissue)
Keywords: EVALUATION Empirical
Contents:
1	The Sample with the Built-in Bias
2	The Well-Chosen Average
3	The Little Figures That Are Not There
4	Much Ado about Practically Nothing
5	The Gee-Whiz Graph
6	The One-Dimensional Picture
7	The Semiattached Figure
8	Post Hoc Rides Again
9	How to Statisticulate
10	How to Talk Back to a Statistic